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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Would You Bet On Your Book?


The New York Knicks were making a run in the basketball playoffs this spring and I got caught up in the enthusiasm and started talking smack to my uncle, who roots with equal fervor for the Boston Celtics, and my brother-in-law who defends his Brooklyn Nets. 

I got carried away, as all sports fans do, and made crazy claims, saying they have a chance to go all the way, that their best player, Melo, could end up in the Hall of Fame, and that the Knicks, because they have the oldest players this season, are America’s Team – a team anyone can appreciate because they are a team pieced together with guys who have one last run in them.  Two of them retired before the season ended.  They have a 35- and a 29-year-old rookie on the team.  They’re old.

To backup my enthusiasm, I made bets with them.  Uncle Michael lost $20 when the Knicks knocked the Celts out in round one.  My brother-in-law dropped $20 when his prediction the Knicks would lose in 5 to Indiana in the second round proved false.  A colleague at work lost $10 to me as well.  But I stopped making bets because I realized the odds would not be in my favor.  I’d been betting based on some facts and lots of emotion.

I have a chance to win money when I correctly analyze a situation but when I let my emotions or passions blind me, I have a good chance of losing money. I believe too many authors bet on their books out of hope and not fact, out of emotion, and not reason, and out of desire, rather than supportive data.

The last thing you want to do is bet on feelings, and not the reality of the marketplace, but really, most authors do just the opposite – they are all about playing out a fantasy or a dream.

Though writing a book and expecting it to be widely read is more a hope than an expectation, anyone who picks up a pen -or computer- does so knowing they are betting on emotion.  Writing is the art form of the mentally ill.  We do it for ego, for therapy, and for pleasure.  We do it because we think others will like what we say, that we’ll feel liked, even vindicated as a result. 

We act like the underdog superhero – we think we can rise from obscurity and anonymity to be loved, to be praised, to be showered with money.

Writing, above all else, humbles us, because most writers are forced to confront their fate.  You can bet on that.


Interview With Author Lance Manion


1. What type of books do you write?   I put them in the humor genre but some of them aren't funny. Sometimes this is intentional and sometimes it isn't.

2. What is your newest book about?   It is a collection of short stories aimed at provoking a unique thought in the reader's head. I tend to steer away from immersion and instead provide a framework where the reader can fill in a lot of their own gaps. They know much better than I what amuses or moves them.

3. What inspired you to write it?   I firmly believe there aren't enough weird things for people to read. Our culture is contently pushing people into believing that people like Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers are interesting and talented. There has to be obscure writers and artists out there fighting against this. To plant the seeds of discontent amongst the unwashed masses and expose talk show hosts for the 'safe' products they are.

4. What is the writing process like for you?   I keep it simple. I write when I get an idea. I put it down and then don't revisit it. My first two books I didn't even edit them. I just put all the stories together and put them out. Now I use an editor but I try and keep the 'garage band' vibe going. I'm a big believer in the subconscious providing the most interesting stuff so I try to avoid cleaning things up for fear of losing something that I never intended to write.

5. What did you do before you became an author?   I'm still not an author. I write but I hesitate to call myself a writer because nobody pays me to do it. I was told once by a literary agent to get famous doing something other than writing and then come back to her about writing a book so on some level I'm not trying to be an 'author' anyway. If I did want that tag I'd have a double mastectomy and then put out a novel about my brave fight. Boom ... instant author status.

6. How does it feel to be a published author?   I'm self-published so that immediately removes a lot of the arrogance that comes with being 'published'. In some way it makes it better because it's more organic. When I hear from somebody in Australia or Hungary saying they enjoyed one of my books I not only feel good that they enjoyed it but I feel proud that I was able to reach them in the first place. I once got a note from someone in Spain saying they didn't like my book so now everyone in Spain is dead to me.

7. Any advice for struggling writers?   Keep struggling and avoid advice, especially from self-published people like myself. The last thing you want to do is start to write as if you're taking an English class in college. Just write and then hope it resonates with someone. Be honest and leave no stone unturned. Don't aspire for 'traditional' success. Once you lose the feeling of struggling half the joy of writing goes with it.

8. Where do you see book publishing heading?   The playing field is going to become a lot more level with the new eReader technology. Big publishing houses won't hold all the cards now that anyone can publish a book. The faster we see 1,000 authors selling 1,000 books each instead of 1 movie star or sports hero selling 1 million copies of a shitty book the faster we'll see readers becoming energized again. It will also signal an end to the self-important agents and critics who think they control what gets read.  ¡Viva la RevoluciĆ³n!

RECENT POSTS: IN CASE YOU MISSED THEM




Are You Having A Book Marketing ID Crisis?

Is Your Book Worth More Than A Piano?

Book Marketing Tips From The Belmont Racetrack

Time To Throw A PR Hail Mary?

What Happens When You Really Get to Know Your Connections?

Book Publicists Don’t Know Everything

Writers Read This: You Are Marketers

Pitching To Understaffed Media

Why Authors – and Publicists & Publishers Need A Therapist

Going Small Nets Big Media Splash For Authors

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This blog is copyrighted material by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2013 

Interview With Author Darlene Panzera



1.      What type of books do you write? I write sweet, fun-loving contemporary romance! My big break came when New York Times best-selling author, Debbie Macomber picked my novella to be published with hers in FAMILY AFFAIR which released last June. She said she chose my story because my writing style is very similar to her own. I love writing stories that inspire people to laugh, value relationships, and pursue their dreams.

2.      What is your newest book about? Set in the artsy, historical fishing community of Astoria, Oregon, two sisters and their friend follow their dream to open a hip little shop named Creative Cupcakes and find themselves fighting off a fanatical Zumba dance instructor, a conceited French bakery chef, and an elusive thief dubbed, 'The Cupcake Bandit.' Is there any time left in their busy schedule to search for true love?  I am currently working on THE CUPCAKE DIARIES: Christmas Special Edition, which will be released in November through Avon Books.

3.      What inspired you to write it? I had just taken a trip to Astoria, Oregon to attend the Crab, Seafood and Wine festival (featured in book 2 - Recipe for Love) and told my friends I was going to write a story set in this town. When my editor at Avon Books, a division of HarperCollins, called and asked if I would like to write a series on a cupcake shop I said, "Yes!" And I knew exactly where that cupcake shop was going to be located!

4.      What is the writing process like for you? I start out with just the seed of an idea. In this case, my editor gave me three things to go on: 3 women, a cupcake shop (in a small town), and romance. From there I sketched out three storylines using many of the local landmarks from the setting to inspire scenes and dialogue. I use a poster board full of sticky notes when I outline. Then I fill out a basic plot chart and keep expanding my outline every day until it grows and grows and finally becomes a full manuscript. Then I go back over the story and rearrange scenes if I have to, deepen the characterization, fill in more descriptions. After that I go through the story a third time to polish each sentence word by word, making sure the cadence flows and all facts are correct.

5.      What did you do before you became an author? I have always been a writer but knew the road to publication would be a long one. It takes years to learn the craft of writing and I had bills to pay. I also had a husband and three kids. So I went to vocational school and was a dental assistant for ten years. Then I quit to become a full time mom and continued writing during the kid's nap time. But I never stopped learning and studying how to write better stories.

6.      How does it feel to be a published author? It's been a dream come true. In fact it was the "Make Your Dreams Come True" contest sponsored by Debbie Macomber and Avon Books that led to my first real publication. The expanded novel, BET YOU'LL MARRY ME, came out last December - the first book with my own name on the cover. Then May 7th the first book in THE CUPCAKE DIARIES, Sweet on You made it into the Digital Retailer Top 100 on the Barnes and Noble Nook for pre-orders the day before its release. It continued to rise in the rankings and made it to #7 for overall sales. Each book is set to release one week apart and as I write this I am anxiously awaiting the release of books 2 and 3.

7.      Any advice for struggling writers? Don't give up. No matter how hard, how daunting, how hopeless it seems—don't give up. Half the battle is perseverance. The other half is learning to write. Always keep studying. Go to classes and conferences, volunteer with your local writing chapter. You must connect with other writers and always strive to write better and better stories.

8.      Where do you see book publishing heading? I think half the fun is that no one knows! With the recent popularity of eBooks and the advancements in video and multi-media capabilities the door is wide open. Some of my writer friends and I have dreamed of being able to step into a virtual reality room that puts you directly into the story. Imagine walking around your characters, feel like you are in the setting, maybe even smelling cupcakes or being able to taste them. That would be quite the experience!

RECENT POSTS: IN CASE YOU MISSED THEM

Why Bestseller Cap Doesn’t Deter Authors http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/bestseller-cap-doesnt-stop-authors.html

The Next Great Gatsby Could Be You
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/are-you-great-gatsby.html

Will Your Social Media Save Your Book?  http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/how-big-is-your-social-media-following.html

Is Your Book Worth More Than A Piano?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/whats-your-book-or-piano-worth.html

Book Marketing Tips From The Belmont Racetrack
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/book-marketing-tips-from-belmont.html

Time To Throw A PR Hail Mary?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/never-too-late-for-pr-hail-mary.html

Writers Read This: You Are Marketers
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/writers-read-this-you-are-marketers.html

Why Authors – and Publicists & Publishers Need A Therapist
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/why-authors-need-therapist.html

Going Small Nets Big Media Splash For Authors
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/going-small-gets-big-media-coverage.html

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This blog is copyrighted material by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2013

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

The Amazon Bestseller Formula



Publishers Weekly, back in March, thought it identified how many book sales it takes to make the Amazon bestseller list top 5.  It concluded if about 300 or so copies of a book were sold on Amazon in a given day, it would make the list.  I think it can be even fewer. Here’s why:

·         Those numbers cover just the top 5, but one can make the top 10 or 20 overall with fewer sales.
·         There are many best-seller lists – you can break it down by format, genre, or sub-genre and make some kind of Amazon bestseller list by selling far fewer copies than 300 in a day.
·         Amazon’s lists can change by the hour, so if a book sells, say 100 copies in an hour or two hours, it can hit the list.


Do You Read These Sites?

… As well as these:


Talk About Expansion!
Crayola Crayons had a great idea when it put eight colored crayons on the market in 1903.  By 1949 the selection grew six-fold, to 48 crayons.  Just nine years later that number jumped by 16 to 64.  It grew steadily from there, hitting 96 by 1993.  Now, 20 years later, they sell 120 different colors.  Can your books grow this way, too? Basically, you take a good idea and keep spinning off sequels or variations of the same thing.  Fifty Shades of Green anyone?


Discovery For Authors Begins With Their Social Media and Site
Before writers look to be interviewed on The Today Show or Charlie Rose or The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, they need to launch a grass roots campaign that begins right at home – literally. Authors have the power of the click, right on their home computers, tablets and smart phones.  Before hoping the mass media gives exposure to your book, build up a fan base of supporters by having a good Web Site, Facebook page, and a Twitter strategy.  Post regularly on your blog.  Folks, this basic message is missed by more than half the writers out there.  It could be that writers don’t have the time or resources or the desire to make sure they have laid a digital foundation for their writing brand, but by not doing so they nearly doom their chances of long-term, big-time success.

E-book Choices For Self-Publishing
Authors have many choices on how to self-publish an e-book.  Apples iBookstore, Kobo, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble PubIt, and Amazon’s kindle each offer different royalty systems.  Which one is right for you?

  Interview With Author Steve K. Smy

1.      What type of books do you write? I am, theoretically, working on an epic fantasy novel.  That's hit a wall at the moment.  In the meantime, I've been writing short story and novelette length pieces.  The short stories are in three different genres: fantasy, science fiction, and horror.  They include a series of five related tales.  The novelettes are split into two different series.  One is old fashioned science fiction, the other is something of a mixed genre affair, involving horror, future fiction, parapsychology, occult and supernatural.

2.      What is your newest book about? The newest, Evil Under the Circle, is a sequel – number two in my G1: The Guardians series.  It involves an elite team of specialists who combat the incursions of evil into our world.  It's set at some point in the not too distant future.  In this tale, the discovery of an underground system beneath a megalithic stone circle also releases an evil entity from a captivity that has lasted for millennia.  G1, the elite team of the Guardians, move in.  Defeating the entity will prove to be far from routine, however.

3.      What inspired you to write it? It really came about by accident.  Not wishing to become too comfortable in my writing, I started experimenting with other genres.  The Guardians came about and have now claimed a place in my library of unwritten tales.  This latest offering also reflects a certain fascination with Britain's ancient stone circles and history.

4.      What is the writing process like for you? I am driven to write.  In fact, I have to write.  If I don't, then my head becomes a chaotic blend of different ideas for stories, and even whole scenes playing themselves out.  It's much simpler to give in and put it all into the written word.  One thing I have learnt is that I can't plan it all out.  That kills the spark and I abandon the story.  It just has to flow.  Fortunately, using a computer for writing, correcting problems is much simpler than the old typewriter days.  The hardest part is the editing: all that rereading!  I am, however, a meticulous editor.

5.      What did you do before you became an author? I'd actually have to list various things that I did after I became an author!  I started writing seriously when I was 13 years old.  Since then, I've worked in horticultural research, in purchasing in the engineering department of an electricity supplier (where I became the PC specialist, even though I was self-taught), in retail and as a freelance computer tech.  The advent of disability, while very unwelcome, freed me from employment considerations and I have returned to writing full time.

6.      How does it feel to be a published author? Well, I guess I would have felt greater satisfaction if I had been taken on by a publisher, but self-publishing has still given me a huge sense of achievement.  The best parts have been getting some very nice reviews, receiving a lot of support from other authors and, of course, those first sales!  I will admit to a tremendous sense of joy, and relief, when I saw those sales.  Pennies, perhaps, but that's really not that big a part of the pleasure of writing success.

7.      Any advice for struggling writers? Keep writing!  That's the most important thing of all.  Even if you don't have an audience.  Also, don't box yourself in.  Don't reject any option for getting your work out there.  There are many choices, from blogging, through things like Wattpad and Scribd, through to self-publishing.  You don't have to think in terms of getting an agent and a publisher.  By all means look into the many excellent advice websites, and take from them anything that fits you!  Many people talk about 'rules', but the only rule is that you all rules are guidelines.  And be honest with your writing!  Don't think that you'll be more successful by jumping onto the latest bandwagon.  Whatever fashion there might be for a particular type of book, if you involve yourself in it, then you'll be competing with far more authors for a limited number of readers.  Don't write Twilight type books, for example, if you've always written westerns before.  Stay true.  Experiment, by all means, but for your sake.

8.      Where do you see book publishing heading? I think traditional publishing will be around for a very long time, though it is likely to slowly contract into one or two big publishers and lots of little ones.  Print on demand (POD) may well take a bigger share, as publishers try to keep costs minimised.  Digital publishing will, probably, take the biggest share, eventually.  The chances are that ebook producers will start to feature some very sophisticated features in their products, with ever more interactivity.  For instance, I can foresee a time when a networkable eReader will be made available to schools and libraries, so that a single copy of an ebook is held on the master device and disseminated by wifi to satellite devices, so that students, for example, can still participate in class reading sessions.  Such devices would probably also appear in business, where security might require limited numbers of certain documents; the devices allowing conferences to be held while only one copy of a document is ever actually held by the master device.  There will also be a continued evolution of “picture books” for children, expanding into the realm of encyclopedias and dictionaries.  Text books will be the biggest winners.  They won't need to be reprinted all the time, to stay current.  The revisions would simply be fed directly into the existing ebooks.
                                                                                                        
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RECENT POSTS: IN CASE YOU MISSED THEM

Why Bestseller Cap Doesn’t Deter Authors http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/bestseller-cap-doesnt-stop-authors.html

The Next Great Gatsby Could Be You
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/are-you-great-gatsby.html

Will Your Social Media Save Your Book?  http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/how-big-is-your-social-media-following.html

Is Your Book Worth More Than A Piano?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/whats-your-book-or-piano-worth.html

Book Marketing Tips From The Belmont Racetrack
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/book-marketing-tips-from-belmont.html

Time To Throw A PR Hail Mary?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/never-too-late-for-pr-hail-mary.html

Writers Read This: You Are Marketers
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/writers-read-this-you-are-marketers.html

Why Authors – and Publicists & Publishers Need A Therapist
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/why-authors-need-therapist.html

Going Small Nets Big Media Splash For Authors
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/going-small-gets-big-media-coverage.html

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This blog is copyrighted material by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2013

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Population Growth Revamps Book Marketing Strategy



The list of 20 biggest cities, based on a July 1, 2012 USA Today analysis of 2010 Census data, includes many surprises and statistical osdities. As a result, one must look at the news media in those locations and re-evaluate the book market landscape.

The top 20 includes 5 cities in California, and 4 in Texas, but only one in Florida – and it’s not Miami, Orlando, or Ft. Lauderdale.  The fastest growing big city is Austin, in the number 11 spot.  It’s grown 6.6% in the last two years.  The only city on the list to decline in population is fast-sinking Detroit.  At number 18 on the list, it shed 1.7% of its population over two years.

Oddly, Boston, Atlanta and Washington D.C. did not make the list.  It may just be the technical way that a population is accounted for, but these cities and for sure, their nearby suburbs, account for more people than places like El Paso or Memphis.  New Jersey, one of the biggest states, lacks a Top 20 city.

Many of the higher-ranking or fast-growing cities are spurred by an ever-expanding Latino market.  This means Spanish-language media will challenge some of the influence and reach of English-based media in these cities. 

In a country of 50 states and 310 million, there are only nine cities with one million or more people.  New York City is still, far and away, America’s biggest city.  Its 8.34 million residents surpass the combined totals of the cities ranked 11 through 20. 

When strategically planning your book marketing and book publicity campaign, take note of the top 20 cities:

1.      New York       8,336,697
2.      Los Angeles    3,857,799
3.      Chicago          2,714,856
4.      Houston          2,160,821
5.      Philadelphia    1,547,607
6.      Phoenix           1,488,750
7.      San Antonio    1,382,951
8.      San Diego       1,338,348
9.      Dallas              1,241,162
10.  San Jose          982,765
11.  Austin             842,592
12.  Jacksonville     836,507
13.  Indianapolis    834,852
14.  San Francisco  825,863
15.  Columbus        809,798
16.  Fort Worth      777,992
17.  Charlotte         775,202
18.  Detroit             701,475
19.  El Paso            672,538
20.  Memphis         655,155


Interview With Author Melissa Ridenour

What type of books do you write? I write children’s books. Both the books that I have written so far address issues that are of concern to children, parents, grandparents, teachers and other child caregivers regarding the safety and well-being of children. One book is already published, and the second one will be published by the end of May 2013.

My first book, What Would You Do? A Kid’s Guide to Staying Safe in a World of Strangers is a nonfiction children’s book. The book teaches and empowers children, in a non-threatening way, to take a proactive role in staying safe from abduction, exploitation, predators and harm. Published by Headline Books, Incorporated, it is a book that, ideally, is meant to be a shared experience among children, parents and teachers. It is an excellent reference that was honored as a Best Book Award Finalist from USA Book News. It also received a five star review from Reader’s Favorites. It is available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, Follett, Baker & Taylor, and Ingrams. Additional information and useful resources can be found at my book website, Melissa Harker Ridenour Books, www.AuthorMelissaHarkerRidenour.com.

I was inspired to write such a stranger safety book because of a traumatic memory from my childhood. When my best friend and I were mere children, I awoke one school morning to my mother having to explain to me that I wouldn’t see my friend in school anymore. She explained to me that my friend had been abducted, raped, and murdered the evening before. That was a difficult thing for me to understand at that age.

As a child, when I would walk to school, I would have to pass the spot where my friend’s body was discovered. I remember, for the longest time, running terrified, past that spot each time. Adding to the tragedy of the story is the fact that her mother, the next year, committed suicide by hanging herself. She was never able to cope with the loss of her daughter, especially in such a violent way.

That haunting memory has always affected me, even as I became a mother myself. One of my greatest fears as a young mother, and even now that my children are grown with children of their own, is that something similar could happen to my children or grandchildren. That fear, combined with the alarming statistics regarding missing and exploited children, motivated me to write a book that would teach children to take a pro-active role in staying safe from abduction, and to help parents and other care givers learn how to keep children safe from abduction or harm.

What is your newest book about? My second book is being published at the end of May 2013. It is called The Bully and the Booger Baby: A Cautionary Tale. It is not only a fun and imaginative school story about a big bully, the kids he picks on, and a little boy robot who tries to lead the charge to stop the bullying problem in their school, but it is also an informational book. It includes two sections of researched and effective strategies and resources for children, parents, and teachers to help them better deal with today’s ever-increasing bullying problem.  It will be available in paperback and Kindle on Amazon. It will also be available in Nook format through Barnes & Noble.

What inspired you to write it? I was inspired to write The Bully and the Booger Baby: A Cautionary Tale because bullying in our schools is an ever-increasing problem. Children, parents and teachers are looking for solutions to the bullying dilemma. My new book offers solutions to children in the form of a fun fiction school story and through non-fiction researched strategies that will help children, parents and teachers recognize the bullying problem for the serious concern that it is and adequately address it.

What is the writing process like for you?    I have always written. Even as a child, I used to make up silly little stories and write them down for my family to read – whether they wanted to or not.  I also taught creative writing and research and writing as a Language Arts teacher. I didn’t start writing professionally until I retired from teaching.
I try to get writing done every day. From mid-morning to late afternoon, I am either working on new stories or trying to keep up with my freelance writing schedule. Actively promoting and marketing my books cuts into my writing time somewhat. Marketing and promotion, alone, is a full time job.

What did you do before you became an author?   I am a retired teacher and librarian. After retiring from teaching, I was able to devote more time to my writing career. I have always loved books and reading, and I have always strived to motivate children to love books and reading, as well. Now that I am a children’s book author, I still try to have a positive impact on children’s lives.

 I am motivated by advocating for the safety and well-being of children. I hope that my books, as well as my Child Safety Blog, will serve to advocate for that purpose.

How does it feel to be a published author? I enjoy being a published author. As a children’s book author, I am in a position to continue to positively impact children’s lives. There is something to be said for having a written legacy to leave behind, as well. Becoming published is a long and difficult endeavor, however. The process is not for the faint of heart.

Any advice for struggling writers? Publisher rejection slips are painful to both experienced and inexperienced writers, but publisher rejection comes with the territory. My suggestion is that writers should not take publisher rejection personally, keep writing and submitting, and don’t despair. They are in good company. Some very famous and successful writers have received their fair share of rejections and unfavorable reviews. Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was referred to by critics as “a stiff, overwrought story”. Jane Austen was reviewed as “a husband –hunting butterfly.” A critic called Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities “a dead pull from start to finish”.  Just write, write, write! After writing something, put it aside for a time, and then come back to it later and read what you have written. Often that gives a fresh perspective to your writing and, most usually, results in editing and rewriting until you are satisfied with your finished piece. Oscar Wilde once said, “I have spent most of the day putting in a comma and the rest of the day taking it out.”

Where do you see book publishing heading? I believe that book publishing, like most businesses, took a hit during the recession This possibly makes it even more difficult for unknown writers to get published. It is discouraging to have one’s work buried beneath a publisher’s slush pile of countless manuscript submissions. That may be one reason that self-publishing has become an attractive option for writers who face difficulty finding a “home” for their cherished work. I also believe that traditional publishers have begun to take notice of the self-publishing option and are beginning to see self-published authors in a new and a little more respected light. They realize that many writers are enjoying the alternative of not sharing royalties with the big publishing houses. With that being said, though, who would not seize the opportunity to be picked up by a Random House or some other famed publishing enterprise?


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RECENT POSTS: IN CASE YOU MISSED THEM

Why Bestseller Cap Doesn’t Deter Authors http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/bestseller-cap-doesnt-stop-authors.html

The Next Great Gatsby Could Be You
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/are-you-great-gatsby.html

Will Your Social Media Save Your Book?  http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/how-big-is-your-social-media-following.html

Is Your Book Worth More Than A Piano?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/whats-your-book-or-piano-worth.html

Book Marketing Tips From The Belmont Racetrack
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/book-marketing-tips-from-belmont.html

Time To Throw A PR Hail Mary?
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/never-too-late-for-pr-hail-mary.html

Writers Read This: You Are Marketers
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/writers-read-this-you-are-marketers.html

Why Authors – and Publicists & Publishers Need A Therapist
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/why-authors-need-therapist.html

Going Small Nets Big Media Splash For Authors
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/going-small-gets-big-media-coverage.html

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This blog is copyrighted material by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2013





Diversify Your PR Approach


Can you imagine sharing your links and book information with thousands of other people? That's your goal, right?

Certainly social media allows you such an opportunity, should you have such a following. Is that better than conducting a news media campaign?

Hopefully you don’t have to choose between the two but it seems many do. Some choose a social media strategy thinking that’s all they need to do. Others do it out of desperation, because nothing is more affordable than free. But the best approach is to use social media and traditional media and online media, and not to defer to just one of them.

Some favor traditional media and non-social online media because they don’t have a lot of time to build up followers on Twitter or to post on Facebook or to connect with people using YouTube, Pinterest, or their blog. But when one can do a little of everything, a lot can happen.
One media placement leads to another. You build your media resume by doing everything possible. Guest post on another’s blog. Interview someone for your blog. Tweet about the radio interview that you just did. Seek to get a book review, whether online or in print. Make local TV appearances. Post links on your Facebook page. It’s all connected.

Even within social media, traditional media or other online media, there’s a lot of variety needed. Just blogging and tweeting about your book is not enough. Neither is posting YouTube book trailers or running some pay-per click ads on Facebook. And you always need to be building up your list of connections – however they happen.

Whether you build up followers on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter – or all of them – or whether people sign up for a newsletter, e-book or free download – capture names and email addresses and keep a list of people to contact when needed.

Anyone who tells you they just did one thing, even if done well, to successfully promote and market a book, is either:

1. Lying.
2. Misinformed.
3. Not realizing/aware they did more than that.
4.  Very, very lucky.
5. Missing opportunities to generate more interest and sales.

Whatever approach you take, the more you do, and the more you do wisely, and the more variety you inject into the process, the more likely your marketing will be successful.


Interview With Author Tina Brown

1.    What type of books do you write? My first book was non-fiction. A memoir.  The one I'm currently writing is fiction.  

2.    What is your newest book about?  It is a story of the struggles of one young black woman born and raised in Southern Virginia

3.    What inspired you to write it?  I've always been able to create stories.  only recently did I attempt to publish.

4.    What is the writing process like for you?   I just write.  I sit in front of my laptop and just write.

5.      What did you do before you became an author?  I still have a day job.  I'm a Human Factor Engineer.

6.    How does it feel to be a published author? It's absolutely awesome.  I never knew others would be interesting in reading my thoughts. 

7.    Any advice for struggling writers?  Write from the heart.   Write about what you know.   Don't give up.

8.      Where do you see book publishing heading?  Today's technology enables almost anyone to assume the title of author.  Publishing is a hugely competitive business.  Perseverance is a must if an author hopes to "make it" in this venue.

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Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This blog is copyrighted material by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2013