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Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Book Industry Disgracefully Challenges Free Speech



It seems like the issues of book bans, censorship, and boycotts never seem to go away.  Even in America, where free speech is discussed, taught, encouraged, and praised we continue to come across cases that challenge us.  The latest such firestorm is over the announced book deal for conservative loudmouth Milo Yiannopoulos.

I must profess I never heard of this guy before last week.  From what I have discovered about him, there’s little to like but I’m prepared to defend his right to be published and the right of his publisher, Threshold Editions, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, to publish him.  Free speech is more important than any one person or book.

So what’s the controversy?  Well, it is two-fold.  The initial controversy is over whether Milo deserves a platform.  The Donald Trump supporter has compared Islam to cancer, mocked transgender people, and suggested women who are harassed online should stay off the Internet.  He’s a senior editor at Breitbart News. Over the summer Twitter banned him because he violated the platform’s rules on hate speech and harassment.

He got a six-figure advance. I say, so what?

If you don’t want to buy or read it, don’t.

It’s that simple.  The publisher sees an opportunity to make money by publishing his diatribe.  That’s capitalism.  The publisher also helps create a dialogue, which is what books should do.  It people read it and disagree with the book, they will be inspired to act.

But when one person or group says someone doesn’t have the right to talk or publish the words of others, we sink far lower than Milo’s actual words.  The reaction to the planned publishing of the book has been swift.

Some of it you expect – fellow authors criticizing the deal or experts questioning what he could offer readers.  But some of the reaction is an overreach.  Not only are some calling for a boycott of the book, but a boycott of the publisher’s catalog of books.  One misintentioned media outlet, The Chicago Review of Books, said it would not review any of the company’s books this year.

Once you get into punishing the publisher beyond the targeted book you cross the line.  What you are then doing is punitively going after free speech itself.  Those in the book world who engage in or endorse such behavior are barbarians, hypocrites of the highest order.  We don’t just publish or read books that we like or agree with our views; we engage in the thoughts, ideas, experiences and opinions of all in order to properly make an informed conclusion.

It pains me to have to bitch-slap those in the book publishing and news media world.  But anyone who shits all over the First Amendment is asking us to go back into tyranny, anarchy, and the Dark Ages.

Luckily, others are speaking out against the haters.  English PEN and these groups have defended the Milo book deal:  National Coalition Against Censorship, American Library Association’s Freedom to Read Foundation, American Booksellers Association, Association of American Publishers, Author’s Guild, Index or Censorship, National Council of Teachers of English and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

The passion behind the boycotts is understandable.  The reaction is not, however, in proportion to the situation.  No book, however offensive, controversial, or ugly, should be banned, and no publisher, printer, bookstore, or author should be threatened for its role in publishing and selling the book.  Further, to take the argument beyond that specific book, and to issue a war on all books of a publisher, store, or author is to turn the argument away from one book and to threaten all books.

Yes, free speech allows for others to criticize the publisher and author, and I encourage such behavior.  But when we look to extort a publisher, we’ve gone too far.

The controversy, of course, has sparked the exact opposite outcome that protestors were hoping for:  the book is a big seller months before its scheduled release.  Amazon said it became the No. 1 seller one day after being announced.

Twitter, where he’s banned, noted its number one trending topic was Milo in the U.S.

Do I plan to buy his book?  No.  I don’t have an interest in reading the misinformed opinions of a right-wing hater.  I didn’t buy Glen Beck’s books, nor those of Bill O’Reilly, Ann Coulter, Dick Cheney, or Rush Limbaugh for the same reason.  But I support their publishers for choosing to publish them and would never think to call for a backlash against the publishers or stores that produced or sold such books.

I care more about free speech than the contents of that speech. I care more about protecting all of our rights then concerning myself if a bad apple benefits as s result. The best way to contain speech we disagree with is to let it get published and use your free speech rights to counter, correct, and place it into context. You can protest by not buying the book, by encouraging others not to buy it, by criticizing the book publicly, by countering with a book of your own, and by helping others to learn why this book is wrong in facts or intentions. 

Free speech is challenging, but we should keep it simple.  Just acknowledge that writers can say what they want, provided it’s factual and doesn’t violate copyright, libel, or slander, or defamation laws.  Publishers have the right to publish all viewpoints.  Stores can sell such books.  Readers can choose what to buy and they reserve the right to protest and to criticize.  But keep it contained.  Once we raise an issue that goes beyond a specific book, we create a nuclear war scenario that no one wins.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Interview with author Rich Garon



Felling Big Trees

1.     1.  What inspired you to write your book?
I had recently retired from a twenty-five-year career on Capitol Hill. I had some great experiences there and I hoped to incorporate them into a novel that saw a more human side of a congressman’s life and what this particular person experienced after leaving Capitol Hill.  

2. What is it about?
It’s about a disgraced congressman who turns to the American heartland to find redemption in the eyes of his daughter and the woman he loves; the woman who has taught him to love again. Stripped of the detachment that characterized his early years in congress, Fran is drawn to an everyman perspective. What breeds inaction and apathy? How do we jumpstart a deeper connection to the injustices we see every day? How far will we humble ourselves to help those with few resources?

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book?
That they might consider those same questions. As a matter of fact, this novel is part of a series called Writing for Change, as you’ll see at my website, www.richgaron.com. Proceeds from the sale of this novel will go to WhyHunger, a non-profit in New York City that I’ve worked with, which has been fighting hunger problems for the past forty years. I have three more manuscripts that will be released in this Writing for Change series with proceeds in each case going to fight one of the critical problems we face as a society.

4. What advice do you have for writers?
Read a lot to develop writing skills and about how the book publishing industry works. Be patient and flexible.

5. Where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?
That’s a tough question for someone who has just released a debut novel. I’d say self-publishing is gaining more standing, and social media elements, such as blogs, play a critical role in developing readership.

6. What challenges did you have in writing your book?
This was the second manuscript I completed. As I found out, there can be a lot of moving parts in a novel and they all have to be in sync. It took a lot of re-writing, good constructive feedback from manuscript readers, and a fantastically-talented editor. Early on, a well-known writer I had gotten to know said, “Never Give Up.” That email is taped to the top of my desk.

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?
I believe the story of Congressman Fran Stewart is a story for a time when compassion and tolerance are often overwhelmed by strident tones and lack of basic civility. I hope people might see that as a good enough reason to buy the book.

Rich Garon received both his M.A. and Ph.D. in Politics from New York University and began a career on Capitol Hill that lasted for more than 25 years. For the last six of those years he served as Chief-of-Staff, Committee on International Relations, U.S. House of Representatives. He currently chairs the Serve (Outreach and Mission) Committee at the Immanuel Anglican Church in Woodbridge, VA and coordinates the Homeless Ministry, with an emphasis on those living in the woods. He was named to the Board of Directors of the Greater Prince William County [VA] Community Health Center, and conducts mission trips with his wife, Karen, to Bolivia to support church-building in several areas including what began as a tent city.

For more information, please visit www.richgaron.com, and connect with Garon through Facebook, Twitter, and GoodreadsFelling Big Trees is available for preorder on Amazon and for immediate purchase on BookBaby.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Monday, January 16, 2017

Chinese Ban of NYT App A Disgrace!



Apple is helping support censorship and the suppression of the free exchange of information and ideas in China.  

I like Apple and think they represent the best of the best companies, but this is just wrong.  Should their cooperation with China’s Communist government be met by a protest and boycott in America?

The truth is we’re too immersed in the Apple culture to just pull out.  This is what happens who one company has a lot of power and reach.  Same with Amazon, Facebook, Google, and a handful of others.  We become too dependent on them that, so short of murder, we lack the will or the power to do much about it.

The dangerous thing here is how easily censorship comes about.  Press a button on the Internet and some have access to is vastly different world than what others see.

The New York Times app was scrubbed from Apple’s digital store in China because the dictators there said the app violates a policy that the government issued in June.  The app apparently engages in activities that endanger national security or disrupts social order or both.

Not all media has been censored or banned, but the NYT is the biggest one blocked.  The Washington Post and WSJ, for example, are not banned.

The public record of information and ideas is distorted when some countries or Websites ban the appearance of certain apps or specific books.  When all people don’t have access to all information, and in some cases not even know what they don’t have access to, we have a compromised and diminished world.  Choices should be made not by a country or even a company – it’s up to people to choose what they buy, read or participate in.

Certainly, none of us can even consume one percent of one percent of one percent of the information circulating out there.  We lack the time, funds or awareness to download, read or consume billions of pieces of content.  But when the reason we don’t read something is because of censorship and government bans, we are outraged.  We can’t reconcile the fact that we’re purposely deprived of something – even if there was only a tiny chance we’d have read or clicked on it if given the opportunity.

It’s hard to believe that in 2017 we still discuss things like censorship in real time, but here we are.  Anything that China does impacts one in five global citizens.

But there’s censoring going on in America, too.  

School newspapers are edited by administrations.  Other publications are at the mercy of the sponsors, grants or advisers supporting them.  At libraries across the country, there are book bans going on.  An app here, a book there.  It all adds up to an uneven world, one where some ideas and facts remain out of reach to others.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Apple iPhone Turns 10 – A Book Industry Companion?



Apple’s iPhone turned 10 this January.  Not only is it a special accomplishment for one of America’s favorite products from one of the nation’s favorite companies, but it represents a sea change in global communications and commerce.  The true mobile economy was launched with the iPhone debut on January 9, 2007.

Mass adoption of smart phones and social media came about once the advent of Apple’s phone came about.  The way we shop, socialize, or conduct business was altered permanently once we started carrying portable computers in our pockets.

How has the iPhone impacted authors, publishers, and books?  Many pros and cons came about once the iPhone became a dominant force in our culture.  

The phone allows consumers to:

·         Buy books (pro)
·         Learn about books (pro)
·         Find info for free that they’d normally pay for with a book purchase (con)
·         Be distracted from buying and reading books by all of the free content phones entertain us with (con)
·         Allows authors to use social media to promote their books (pro)
·         Allows authors to self-publish, sell via a web site, and be an independent force (pro)

The smartphone can even be used as an e-reader to read a book, though this does not seem as practical or pleasurable as it may sound.  The small screen is not conducive for enjoying big books.

I recently bought my son an iPhone 7.  He just turned 12 and had lobbied hard this fall for a phone. He tried to convince me he needs it now that he takes a city bus to middle school.  Then he said he wants one because it would be fun.  Finally, he felt obligated to keep up with his peers who seemed to all have a phone.  He said, when he received it, that he now feels like a person.  He tied his identity up with having a phone.  Indeed, it does give him a communications reach that he’d lacked.  He feels pride in owning one.

I think I got my first smartphone seven or eight years ago. I bought an android from Verizon.  It worked well but upon the two-year contract renewal I was curious about Apple and its iPhone.  My first one was the 4.  Then I got a 6, and though my renewal is up I’ve decided not to plunge any further funds into getting a 7 – which would be an upgrade that gets outdated shortly.  There’s nothing the 7 does that is so much better or different than the 6 that I can’t live without.  But it’s tempting.  We are a disposable, upgradeable, shiny-toy-chasing society.

Happy anniversary to Apple on being the king of smartphones. It’s no easy feat with global competition looking to take them down. May the book world grow along with the growth of the iPhone.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Interview With Author David Schroeder


Just Be Love

1. What inspired you to write your book?   I was guided by my soul to write a book on love. Years ago, I had some spiritual people 2 of whom I only met once, yet in conversation with each of them, they both suggested I was to write a book.  The big inspiration was the mystical experience with master teacher Jesus, whose words to me were: Just Be Love, which became the title of the book.

2. What is it about? The book expresses through a series of vignettes, how from our human and ego perspective we forget we are love and worthy, due to difficult and painful life experiences or arrogance.
As a clinical and spiritual social worker and life transition coach, I’ve witnessed and worked with many people wounded and defeated by love, through dysfunctional family dynamics, unhealthy relationships, etc.  In our woundedness we begin to believe we are not good enough and unworthy of love and goodness.  To protect the fragile self, we may create defenses and barriers to love and happiness.  This creates the common, yet painful mistake of making others responsible for our feelings and actions about love and happiness. This pattern continues for those who do not look within and do the inner work of what I call the  “4 R’s”:  Recognizing, Reconciling, Releasing and Reframing their core negative beliefs and behaviors resulting from difficult life experiences.  More importantly Just Be Love offers insights and examples of ways to remember we are love; and I offer unique ways the divine expresses love and goodness to us, through our experiences with people, the natural world and communion with our Creator. The book weaves both the science and spirituality of love, providing you with inspiring messages from spiritual teachers, mystics, and poets, as well as my own insights and perspectives on ways to love. 

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book?  That the idea of unworthiness and separateness does not exist, these feelings and beliefs are of the ego and so it’s an illusion. That our difficult experiences are opportunities to remember we are love and our divinity. The human ego, wants us to forget we are love in painful experiences, while the Spirit/soul of us wants us to remember we are love. The different ways the Creator expresses and shows love through our natural surroundings, people and experiences.

4. What advice do you have for writers?  Work the How: Be Honest Open and Willing with your writing. Don’t give up.  Be yourself, be determined, resourceful, patient and committed to your writing process.  Have fun and be gentle to yourself during this process.

5. Where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?  It seems more people are interested in and writing a book.  So the competition amongst writers, to get a book published seems to be increasing.  The emergence of self-publishing industry offers writer’s greater opportunity to get their work published, with greater control over the publishing process. This creates more competition for the publishing industry as a whole.  The trend now in printing and publishing industries is
shifting from print to digital. use of ebooks over hard or soft cover books, allowing written material to be read on smart phones, tablets, etc. The use of social media to market books has offered a powerful marketing and communication link between author and public. Social media also provides the author an opportunity to offer online courses around their book material.

6. What challenges did you have in writing your book? Hardship with writing/grammar, due to learning struggles.  Struggle with self-doubt, saying what I wanted to say, through the written word. My being too progressive in thinking and knowing, some people not ready for this type of read.

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours? I believe more people are ready to  deeply explore within themselves their false beliefs and barriers to self-love, loving others unconditionally, and recognize the true and divine intent of love. My book, offers insight and inspiration on ways to love from a higher more profound perspective. I stress the importance of acceptance, changing what you can, and compassion for self and others. How these actions are fundamental ways to move forward toward greater love and happiness.
Just Be Love is a book to return to again and again. Each time you read a chapter, you will discover deeper insights. The messages are intended to help you come to a higher awareness that our purpose for being, is to Just Be Love.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Can You Write Better Than A 6th-Grader?



I came across a book that made me feel good about the next generation.  It’s called Everything You Need to Ace English Language Arts In One Big Fat Book.  It’s part of a series of books called The Complete Middle School Study Guide.

You may wonder what’s so inspiring about such a book.  First, I love the style it’s presented in.  It features lined pages like that of a student’s notebook.  It has colorful graphics and alternates between easy-to-read handwriting and print.  It feels easy to just flip through and land on an interesting exercise or valuable lesson.  Second, I like that such a book exists because it really does make what seems complex simple and straightforward.  Third, I love to see what young minds are being told about our language, writing, poetry, and how to read a book.

I should give this to my son, in sixth grade, but I’m enjoying it too much.

The 488-page book from Workman Publishing is a steal with a list price of $14.95.  I picked up a discounted copy at Barnes & Noble for $9.00 as a member.  Well worth it.

The first unit is on grammar, which it describes as “the structure of a language – not what words mean, but the way words fit together: how the words in a sentence are arranged and the rules that explain how words get used.”  It went on to detail prepositions and independent clauses. It talked about intensive pronouns, verbs and mood, and the Latin and Greek roots of our words.  Dangling modifiers, conjunctions, and complex sentences are all things I failed to fully understand in school.  Back then, I didn’t appreciate the English code or scientific formula for how words connect to each other in a technical sense.  I just wrote from the heart and edited based on what sounded right.  I could be violating some rules of the language right now, but I think what I’m saying reads well and has impact.  If people don’t understand me or completely misinterpret my intensions then I’ll go back to study up on possessive pronouns, gerunds, and the present participle.

Don’t get me wrong, I greatly respect and defend our beautiful and historically-rich language. We need everyone to learn it and use it properly.  We can’t afford to have a single illiterate amongst us.  But I just disagree on how we come to learn the language.  Not everything has to have a name to identify how words come together.

Certainly we need to understand the verb-noun-adjective thing.  We need to know the difference between a passive and active voice. Certainly we need to understand context and the nuances of words.  Tense consistency and proper word selection are key, too.  Wow, the more I think about it, there’s really so much we need to know to not only properly function, but to master the language.

A good place to start is by learning the roots of words.  Once we know that bi means two, we understand words like bisect, biennial, and bisexual.

Pronunciation is a tricky thing to learn.  It can only come with practice and correction.  For instance, silent letters confuse us.  So does a letter with multiple sounds as in c for cook, where it sounds like a k, and when c sounds like an s, as in cents.

At least there are tools like this book to help us.  We also have the dictionary, thesaurus, and style books.  But language is something you pick up by observing and using.  It’s experiential.  It’s living and breathing.

The chapter on figurative language usefully shows how often references are made to familiar things.  There’s Biblical allusion, literary allusion, allusion, personification, verbal irony, alliteration, mythological illusion, the pun, simile, and the metaphor.

We need to also grasp how words relate to one another, from synonyms and antonyms to analogues and homonyms.  Figuring out the denotation vs. the connotation of a word makes a big difference.  The book tackles a lot of ground but it was missing one key area – the role of a strong vocabulary.  To know words, is to know life. 

The chapter on reading fiction explores a variety of genres and explains the difference between science fiction and romance or historical fiction. It also touches upon the parody, mythology, satire, allegory, realism, and drama.  Don’t forget poetry.  Remember there’s more than rhyming poetry, such as free verse, lyrical, and epic.

Page 150 has a valuable lesson:  How to write an objective summary.  This is something lost on most writers, journalists, and bloggers.

Maybe there’s a lot in this book that people need to learn or get a refresher course in.  Who could forget Shakespeare’s works in iambic pentameter!?  Don’t forget the sonnet.

The units on non-fiction noted the varying types of prose, including:  literary non-fiction, biography, memoir, journalism, opinion pieces, exposition, essay, personal essay, arguments, speeches, epistles, and historical/ scientific/technical/economic accounts.  It goes on to explain the author’s viewpoint, opposing viewpoints, and counter arguments. It does a good job of identifying the plot, themes, tone, and structure of what’s presented in a book.

It discusses paraphrasing, plagiarism, and the proper citation of resources.  It also goes over how to approach writing, revising, and editing.  Punctuation, ellipsis, redundancy, narration, character creation, and scores of other useful writing techniques, reader guidelines, and language rules flow from these pages.

Thumbing through this book was like a trip down memory lane.  You realize how much you know and have learned after all of these years of school and then real-life practice. 

Can you write better than a middle-schooler?  Read up – and then go write your masterpiece.

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Saturday, January 14, 2017

The Book Publishing Game: Will You Play?



For the holidays I made a last minute trip to Target.  I was looking for some games to play with my wife and kids.  I settled on Scattergories and a game that resembled Charades.  I realized there are only a few types of games out there, beyond the solo-centric toys.

Some are trivia-filled.  Others involve player-created content, like the two I bought.  Some just involve luck and dice rolls.  Few involve real strategy, thought or creativity.  I guess this is why classics like Monopoly continue to sell so well.

Games that work for kids and adults are hard to come by, especially if a child is under double-digits --which my daughter is.  You either can’t use the same language (blue) or someone lacks key life experience reference points.  But it is fun when you can play together.  Scrabble is another classic that still plays well.  Pictionary too.  But few games have come out 15 or more years ago that still remain on store shelves.

My question is this:  Why aren’t there any board games that have a book theme?

I’m not talking about a random question in Trivial Pursuit that mentions a book title; I want a whole game dedicated to books.

There’s a lot of material available for such a game.  You can have a series or spin-offs that cover books of a certain genre, era, or region.  There are millions of books and centuries of writers to call upon.

So what would the main game be?

How about:  “Should I Be Published?”

It could be a game of strategy on how to get a book published.  Real authors play it daily.

Or it could be a book trivia game about famous, award-winning, and critically acclaimed books or authors.

Maybe have a game based on how a book is created, edited, and promoted.  It could be called “Publisher,” where each player has to make decisions that impact the running of a publishing company.

Perhaps the game could be called “Name that Author,” where you’re given hints and facts and you have to name the author.  Or make it “Name that Book,” and you need to determine which passage appeared in which book.

Any game supporting, highlighting or marketing books, authors, and the book publishing industry would be great to see.  When will such a game get the green light?

The game world, similar to book publishing, comes down to competition and the perception a company has as to whether an idea will sell well.  The same gatekeepers in publishing exist in the toy world.  Music and Hollywood too.

I once promoted the woman who created Jenga.  It is an incredible story.  Creating a hit game with lasting power is a rare feat indeed.  But maybe a game revolving around some aspect of book publishing -- like identifying literary landmarks – will be a big success.  Plus it will certainly educate players and further the advancement of the book industry.

If the Publishing Game gets produced, will you play it?

All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs