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Friday, June 15, 2018

Which Message Should Authors Sell To The News Media?



What exactly is the message you want to convey and sell to the news media so journalists, broadcasters, and social media sites will want to cover you and your book?

It’s a simple question but the answer often befuddles authors, who are too close to their subject matter and too invested in their books to find clarity.  However, for the media to pay any attention to you, an author must perfect the following:

1. An inviting subject line for an email pitch.  Without that, people won’t even click to open the email to see what you have to offer.

2. A powerful opening paragraph to your pitch or press release.  Once they see something worthy clicking on and find the headline inviting – or at least not a turn-off, they want to know what it is that you are offering.

3. The other core element to your pitch or press release are the 4-6 one-line bullet points that you include to highlight what you will talk about or describe why the book is unique and newsworthy.  Don’t just say the book’s great – show us what’s great.

4. Somewhere in your pitch you need to state -- briefly --what your qualifications for writing the book are.  How is your career, personal experience, or place in society related to what you write about?  There will be a place for a detailed biography in your press kit materials, but you still need a few lines that sum up your relevance in your pitch.

5. A great 20-second elevator pitch.  That’s it – a third of a minute is what you have to present your book and your life to the media. When you talk to the media, whether by phone or in person, you need to succinctly state what you are offering and to say so without sounding staged, scripted or rehearsed.

So how do you find a way to present your message under such restrictions of time and/or word length?

First, just free-think and allow yourself to brainstorm with no limits.  Jot down words, phrases, or sentences about what’s special, interesting, new, or unique about your book and yourself.

Second, once done, start to fill in the blanks and then reshape with better word choices.  Finally, re-order these thoughts from most important to least.  Remove any repetition and edit it down so that it makes sense but utilize an economy of words.

Third, imagine being the media professional, and someone else is selling himself to you.  What are you looking for and how do you hear what’s being shared with you.  Turn a mirror to yourself and see how you look to others who know nothing about you and tend to look at others in a scrutinizing, jaded manner.

What’s a good message to share?

·         It should be relevant to the media outlet or specific person that you contact. A rock station isn’t necessarily interested in a book on business nor is a woman’s magazine interested in a story about men who want to reform the prison system.  Know your audience and the needs of whom you are contacting.

·         It should be timely, relate to things in the news, reflect current trends, or tie into the calendar – a holiday, a season, an honorary day, the weather, and things that happen annually from graduations and birthdays to spring break and industry conventions.

·         It should expose a secret, share a truth, convey a new philosophy, challenge a myth, or break new ground.

·         It can be controversial and against expectation. It can challenge the establishment or present a revised way of looking at history.

·         It can be new, unique and fresh – something not seen or spoken of ever before.

·         It can be about a personal or professional experience that helps others or is so odd and initially great or horrific that people would be extremely curious.

·         It can raise a question and spark a debate.

·         It can issue a challenge, make a claim, demand change, call for action or represent a protest, lawsuit, boycott, or ban.

·         It can exploit humor, sex, power, wealth, religion or politics – something that is entertaining and sure to be talked about.

Your message can be about anything – starting with the facts of the book’s content and your relevant background.  Then, you can shape it to fit the criteria of the media outlet and the day or time that you contact them.  Whatever it is that you determine is your best message, be prepared to alter it, taking into account the feedback that you receive.

As great as your book may be – or as amazing as your life may seem – none of it matters unless you can gift wrap it into a tidy message that the media can understand, believes it wants, and concludes that only you can provide.


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Enjoy New 2018 Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit -- 7th annual edition just released


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Do You Offer Click Bait Or Incentives To Buy Your Book?



Today’s book publishers and authors understand that to succeed with branding and book sales, one must champion themselves through social media.  But sometimes we get lost between creating click bait and finding real incentives to get people to buy now.  Here is what you should be aware of:

You need to inspire people to take an action step – to buy your book.  To get them to do that you either present your case with the option to buy or you tease with something, hoping to get your consumer to take a middle step of clicking onto your website or downloading something that will then help sell them on buying your book.

In addition to securing book sales, you still want to get more clicks to your site, where you help your SEO, and have a chance to capture their info for future use, and to sell other services or products.

You also want to get more “Likes” and more followers on social media, so think about what will incentivize people to do that and not just buy books.

So the question is this:  What should you offer as click bait?

·         Free book.
·         Downloadable resource.
·         Access to other free content like a webinar.
·         Something of perceived value from a friend/partner.
·         Something that helps them.

All that we do is read, click, share.  Our society is overwhelmed by the overflow of content out there.  No one can read, listen or watch even one-millionth of what’s posted daily.  Think about what will properly motivate others to read, click, share, and buy.

Learn 5 Words A Day
Remember when you made an effort to improve your vocabulary?  You thumbed through the dictionary randomly to discover words – or, you looked up words you came across when reading a book or newspaper.  Maybe you studied wordlists or enjoyed Reader’s Digest’s monthly word showcases. It’s never too late to start anew and continue learning new words or to remind yourself of words you haven’t used of late.  Your writing only improves when you elevate your vocabulary and express yourself intelligently.

Here are six to get you started:

Neologism – a newly coined word or expression. The Internet makes up words daily.

Spoonorism – A humorous reversal of sounds in two words.  Example:  Don’t put all of your begs in one ask it.

Aptronym – A name that perfectly represents him or her.  Think of the poet, William Wordsworth.

Mondegreen – A famous lyric that is often misheard.

Portmanteau – A clever word created by blending two words.  If someone continues to talk on a mobile phone in a rude manner, you might say he’s “cellfish.”

Paraprosdokian – A sentence or phrase that ends in an unexpected way.

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Enjoy New 2018 Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit -- 7th annual edition just released


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

How Do We Make America A Book Nation?




There’s a statistic that’s been floating around for a few years that is disturbing.  Approximately 1 in 4 people last year in the United States did not read a single book.  Not a single celebrity biography, not a cheap romance novel, not a book about one’s hobby, favorite sport, or even a self-help book.  Sad as that is, it’s gotten worse.

40 years ago, 8% of Americans said they didn’t read a single book in the past year.  This means the rate of non-book readers has tripled over that time.

If the rate triples again, that would mean that in 2058, 3 out of 4 Americans will not have read a book that year.


I am proud that I work for a company – Media Connect – that celebrates the written word and promotes a wide variety of books to the news media and the masses. Everyone in the book industry should be involved in not just marketing their own books, but in promoting all books to all people.  For nearly 30 years I have championed over 1,000 books as part of my career, but as a private individual I passionately celebrate the power of books as well.

Of course the country is deeply invested in bringing about 100% literacy – otherwise, society can’t fully function properly. But once we find a way to improve overall literacy, how will we encourage more book readers – and why is that important?

If people can read and comprehend at a high enough level, they’ll be able to contribute more to society, from their jobs to how they interact with others.  But in order to be a savvy consumer, informed voter, active citizen, and someone on a path to deeper understanding of the world we live in, one has to venture past short-form reading.  Here’s why:

Blogs, Facebook posts, and tweets are not reflective of deep research, complex thought, or unbiased viewpoints.  They often are written by ordinary people, without the benefit of an editor, fact-checker or special training in writing or expertise the subject area that they write about.  They fill a purpose and can be useful in the dialogue that takes place daily, but books, they are not.

Real journalism – newspapers, magazines, newswires, trade journals, and newsletters – are a step up.  Typically, those pieces are produced by professionals, with the help of editors, researchers and fact-checkers.  They may have access to interview leading experts and they have a sense of duty to truth, justice and fairness.  That isn’t to say they are perfect or accurate all of the time, but they certainly provide daily insight on the state of society from a trained eye’s perspective.

Then comes the book, a magnificent presentation of facts, data, opinion, analysis and theory – based on lots of research and professional scrutiny.  Not all books are written by qualified experts or even good writers, especially self-published books, but books offer us the best chance to get a fuller picture and deeper understanding of an issue, event, person, or thing. Reading books helps us understand who we are and shows us what we could become.

Novels provide us access to other worlds and help us imagine ourselves a bit differently.  They have proven to be far superior to essays, short stories, and poems in terms of giving the reader a rich, deep story – an escape from life as we know it.

So when tens of millions of Americans don’t pick up a book, they deprive themselves of appreciating life on a different level from one they might get out of short-form reading – if they do much reading at all.

So what can be done to encourage more people to read books?

If economics are the issue, we must play up the access to libraries and the trove of free books available online.  We should also champion used-book stores.

If language is the issue, we must publicize the availability of books in other languages, primarily Spanish, and to also hold special classes to teach English to everyone in this country – legal or illegal immigrants.

If lacking a computer is the reason, we should fund a program to get every man, woman and child an e-reader.

If competing forms of content is the issue, we must highlight the value of a book over other forms of reading, as well as other forms of consuming information or entertainment.  Enjoy going to see a play, downloading a video, attending a concert, or binging on a Netflix series.  But go read a book, too.

There are many, many reasons that people don’t read books, ranging from incapacitation – blind, in a coma, dementia, mental illness – to learning disorders, such as ADHD or dyslexia.  Others, as they get older or have a lot of stress, will say they don’t have the patience to read.  Some may simply suffer from poor eyesight and without glasses, won’t read a book.  Others may just have exhausting schedules – holding down multiple jobs, lacking sleep, acting as a caretaker, or confronted by a major task.  Some may have long driving or walking commutes, leaving them without the time others may use to read a book while on a train, bus, or plane.

Still, whatever the cause – and sometimes it’s merely an excuse – we need to find a way to get a greater percentage of the population to read a book this year.  We need more tutors, teachers, mentors, parents, grandparents, babysitters, and anyone who is responsible for a child to encourage book reading.  The more kids that are turned on to books, the more likely they’ll be adult readers.  Even if we can’t save adults – though we should try – we should be able to raise the new generation to love books.

How terrible it is to raise a non-reader?  To think that a child today won’t read a single book in a given year of adulthood is really unthinkable.  To those who love reading books we can’t imagine how one lives without a role for books in their life.  But maybe we need to understand why and how we developed into a society, where 2% of its citizens did not buy, borrow, steal or download a single book in 2017.

We can’t dismiss non-readers.  They not only do a disservice to society and themselves, they may end up reproducing and raising non-readers, spawning a multi-generational book deficit.  Not everyone can do or like the same thing – whether it’s about sports, travel, careers, relationships, hobbies, food or anything.  But we should all have a consensus that books are good and positive and important, that we need and should want books the way we need air, water, food, shelter, and clothing.

We all fall into patterns.  A long year gets shortened by daily repetition.  If our daily approach to life is without books, when do we sneak them in?  Weekends?  Vacations?  Travel? We need to create a pattern that is book-inclusive, one where books are seen not as an obligation or chore, but as a right, a pleasure and a reward.  As a way of being.  Books are beautiful ways to learn, feel, think, dream, debate and feel beauty, inspiration and faith.

It helps when an organized effort, one coming from the government, non-profits, and the book industry, puts forward encouragement and opportunity for book reading for everyone. But it also will come down to others – whether it’s institutions like religion, business and education – or to household inspiration or personal responsibility – to inspire the nation to open its hearts, minds, and souls to books so that we can grow, heal, change, and unite.

Read a book today.  Encourage others to read one tomorrow.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

TV’s Criminal Minds Reveals A Killer Approach for Authors To Get Media Coverage



If you want to learn how to promote your book successfully, you might consider watching Criminal Minds, a television show that depicts how a special unit of the FBI profiles and tracks down serial killers.  No, you don’t have to commit bloody murder to get attention from the media, but you do have to apply their use of profiling to get a better handle on how the media thinks and what they want.  You need to be a better hunter.

Criminal Minds always comes up with a hypothesis and tests it against the evidence in hand.  Sometimes they have evidence that allows them to imagine competing scenarios of the truth, and it’s up to the FBI to play out every lead until new facts are learned, and the evidence is re-analyzed and put into a new perspective.

It seems to work in catching repeat killers, rapists, bombers, and psychos.  Maybe such an approach can work with the media.

Let’s start with the facts.  There’s plenty of evidence to examine.  

Begin with what a media outlet has covered in the past.  Start to see the patterns and styles that develop. Match up your observations and collection of data with what the media outlet says it likes to cover.  You’ll learn about how it views itself by the way it sells advertising.  What demographic do they emphasize and say they reach?  How do they describe their outlet on their website?  What subjects does their social media tend to cover?

Next, look at specific reporters, hosts, producers, and editors.  Just as you looked at the whole media outlet, do the same with the individuals responsible for what gets covered by that outlet.  Look up their social media profiles and form a picture of their backgrounds.  What can you assume they may be interested in, personally, once you know things like their age, sex, religion, race, hobbies, education, etc.

Now think about who that media outlet sees as its direct competition, the way the New York Times views USA Today, WSJ, and Washington Post – or the way Today Show competes with GMA, Fox & Friends, and CBS This Morning. Start to have a sense of how they want to scoop or beat their competitors.  See what differentiates these competitors and determine how your story can be packaged as an exclusive to each one, with a customized twist.

Criminal Minds shows there’s a predictability and consistency to serial killers.  Many of them follow patterns and live under some code – if not delusion – to guide their actions.  The media too, lives by its sense of what’s news, what’s ethical, what’s important to them.  Tap into the voice and branded image of a media outlet and appeal to what they admittedly stand for and promote. 

If all else fails, you can always go on a killing spree and get some media coverage.

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Enjoy New 2018 Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit -- 7th annual edition just released


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Monday, June 11, 2018

Have You Read The Book on the Bookshelf?

The Book on the Bookshelf
By
Henry Petroski



For those who appreciate a historical perspective on books, you may appreciate reading The Book on the Bookshelf.  Below are selected excerpts that are of interest to me – and hopefully are to you as well.

1.      “The stories of the evolution of the book and the bookshelf truly are inseparable, and both are examples in the evolution of technology.  More than literary factors, technological factors – those relating to materials, function, economy, and use – have shaped the book and the furniture upon which it rests. The evolution of the bookshelf is thus paradigmatic in the history of technology.  But because technology does not exist independent of the social and cultural environments in which it is embedded and which it in turn significantly influences, the history of technological artifact like the book or the bookshelf cannot be understood fully without also addressing its seemingly non-technological aspects.”

2.      “In ancient times, books did not exist as we know them today.  Roman writings were turned into rolls or scrolls, mostly of papyrus, which were termed volumina.  It is from the Latin singular voluminum that our English word “volume” comes.  Both the width and unrolled length of a scroll varied, as do the height and “length” of a book today.  On average, a scroll may have been from 9 to 11 inches across, and the total length of a volume could be in excess of 20 or 30 feet, with a given work occupying several rolls or volumes.” 

“Greek scrolls were similar; it has been estimated that Homer’s Iliad, for example, would have filled about a dozen rolls, and a reconstructed first – or second-century version of the complete work occupies “nearly three hundred running feet of papyrus.”  Had the words had spaces between them, as they do in all modern books, another 30 feet of papyrus might have been required.  “It is extraordinary that so simple a device as the separation of words should never have become general until after the invention of printing,” but such an observation just reinforces how accustomed we have become to practices that once were far from obvious or necessary.  Wordstruntogether are foreign to our eyes, but “with a little practice, it is not so difficult to read an undivided text as might be supposed.”

3.      “The Latin or Greek volume was read from left to right, and when the scroll was held in the hands, the already-read portion was often rolled up in the left hand while the still-to-be-read text was unrolled from the right, not unlike the way we handle the pages of a book being read today.  Sometimes the finished part of the volume was collected behind the scroll, in the way some people fold the pages of a magazine behind it, but more commonly both the read and unread text were rolled up and unrolled on the same side of the scroll.  The former configuration is commonly seen today in schlock printing, the latter in the way blueprints might be unrolled at a construction site.  However oriented, scrolling on computer screens takes its name from the way scrolls worked, and no matter the manner in which it was read, when a scroll was finished it would have to be rewound to be read again, very much as with a modern videotape after it is viewed.”

4.      “The library at Alexandria, which was founded around 300 B.C. as a repository for copies of all the books in the world, is believed to have held hundreds of thousands of scrolls at one time. Whenever a ship came into port, its scrolls were copied for the library. One story, perhaps apocryphal, has the works of Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus borrowed from Athens in order to make copies for Alexandria.  According to the account, when the copies were completed, it was they that were sent back to Greece, with the original scrolls being kept in Egypt.”

5.      “By the early centuries of the Christian era, bookshelves had to accommodate, in addition to scrolls, a growing number of bound manuscripts, or codices, which in time would displace scrolls as the preferred format for books.  The codex, named for the fact that it was covered with wood (codex means “tree trunk” in Latin), and which led to the term “code” in a legal context, was made by folding over flat sheets of papyrus or parchment and seeing them together into a binding.  This had several distinct advantages over the scroll.  Where an entire scroll might have to be unrolled to find a passage near the end, the relevant page could be turned to immediately in the codex.  Also, writing in a scroll was normally on the side only, whereas the codex lent itself to the use of both sides of the leaf.

“The codex evolved from the tablets made of wood or ivory that in classical times were hinged together to form what might be described as a portable writing surface.  Tax collectors and others who needed to make notations while standing or while sitting on a horse would have found rolls unmanageable.  Not only did scrolls have to be kept from returning to the natural, rolled-up position, but they also needed a hard surface backing them.  In comparison, the handheld tablet was ideally suited for note-taking.  It could be immediately opened to the desired place, and it presented its own hard surface on which to write. The writing was often done with a stylus on a prepared or impressionable surface.  Rather than needing a third limb to hold an inkpot, everything could be done easily with two hands.  When the task was done, the tablet could be tied or clasped shut to protect its contents, and carried securely.  Some tablets had hollowed-out “pages” filled with wax, so that after a day’s notes were transcribed to a more permanent record, as to a scroll, the impressions in the wax could be smoothed out with the flat end of the same stylus that had been used to make them, and the fresh tablet book was ready for another day of note-taking.”

6.      “For a long time papyrus was the medium of choice.  The word is believed to be of Egyptian origin, as is the plant.  The Greeks referred to papyrus as byblos, after Byblus, the Phoenician city that was a center of papyrus exploration.  Hence we have the Greek word for book, biblion, which in turn gave us the English word “bible,” “The Book.”

7.      “Vellum was another alternative to papyrus.  Although vellum and parchment are often confused in usage, they are, strictly speaking, distinct materials.  Vellum, etymologically related to “veal,” is made from calfskin, though the Latin term relates to the hide of sheep and other animals, and even of fishes, have been used for the purpose of making a material for writing upon,” with stillborn lambs and calves having provided “some of the finest and thinnest” material.  In the final analysis, vellum and parchment proved to be more durable than papyrus.  Unfortunately, the animal-derived material did not come easily, for “one sheep yields no more than a single sheet (two leaves) for a folio book.”  Thus, “a very large flock of sheep” might have to be slaughtered to obtain the parchment needed for a single codex.”

8.      “With the exception of the continued use of the scroll in the practice of religion and for legal purposes in a country like Britain, where there remains a Master of the Rolls, the codex in time did drive out the scroll – general texts being copies from rolls into codex form as early as the fourth century – and thus shelves and armaria came typically to contain only volumes more recognizable today as books.  With the increased number of books with which libraries of all kinds had to deal – and collections always do seem to expand – furniture to hold the books multiplied and grew larger.  Armaria generally retained their form of being essentially what today we might call cupboards or wardrobes, and increasingly in the Middle Ages they were kept locked or otherwise secured.

“Security was necessary, of course, because every book was produced by hand.  Each letter, word, sentence, paragraph, page – each entire volume – was laboriously executed by a scribe, either from another manuscript or from the dictation of a lead scribe who presided over a stable of book producers, much as a master may have supervised the galley slaves rowing an ancient trireme.”

9.      “That is what makes the history of technology interesting and relevant, it not only teaches us about the way things used to be done; it also gives us perspective on how things are done today – and how they most likely will be done n the future.”

10.  “Setting moveable type – letter by letter, word by word, line by line, page by page – was certainly little different than copying out a manuscript, but once that type was set, its reverse image could be inked and pressed time after time after time onto blank sheets of paper and transform them in one fell swoop into printed pages that could be gathered into books.  The essential technology to do this was in place by the middle of the fifteenth century, thanks to Johannes Gutenberg’s innovative method of casting metal type and his development of an ink that would adhere to it and to paper, which enabled Gutenberg to typeset, print, and publish his 42-line Bible in Mainz, Germany, in the early-to-mid 1450s. All books that were produced by this new technology up to the year 1501 are known as incunabula, which is Latin for “things in the cradle,” and an incunabulum is an individual book that came out of the infancy of printing.  The Latin was Englished in the mid-nineteenth century to “incunable,” with the straightforward plural “incunables,” a word that replaced the older English term “fifteeners” for books printed in the fifteenth century.

“Incunabula, being books of a transitional period, often owed much of their appearance to manuscripts, including multiple columns of text per page and initial letters added by hand or printed in a contrasting color of ink.  Estimates vary, but the total number of incunabula that survived to the nineteenth century has been thought to be between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand.  The number of each title printed varied, as it does today, according to expected sales, but several hundred copies often constituted an edition.

“Unlike in the Middle Ages, when “a great book might be available in a hundred manuscript copies, and read at most by a thousand people,” after the middle of the fifteenth century a book “could be available in thousands of copies and read by hundreds of thousands of people.”  It has been estimated that in the sixteenth century in Europe alone there were more than one hundred thousand different books printed. If it is conservatively assumed that there were on average as few as one hundred copies of each book (print runs of several hundred were not uncommon in the fifteenth century), ten million individual copies of books were available to Europeans.  (Some estimates are ten times this.)  Thus, by one very conservative estimate, “the power of the printed word increased a hundredfold the power of the written word.”  Furthermore, more books meant more readers, which translated into more writers, which in turn led to the production of still more books.  And more and more books meant an increasing need to find more and different ways to store and display them, including in shops where they were sold.”


“There’s no book so bad that something good may not be found in it.”
--Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (1615)

“When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do – well, that’s Memoirs.”
--Will Rogers, Autobiography (1949)

“Most of today’s books have an air of having been written in one day from books read the night before.”
--Nicolas-Sebastien Chamfort, Maximes et pensees (1805)

“Books are a world in themselves, it is true; but they are not the only world.  The world itself is a volume larger than all the libraries in it.”

--William Hazlitt, ‘The Plain Speaker’, On the Conversation of Authors (1846)

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Enjoy New 2018 Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit -- 7th annual edition just released

Here are best author-publisher-publishing pro interviews of 2017

Study this exclusive author media training video from T J Walker

How do authors get on TV?


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource."