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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Why Should Writers Take A Break?



Writers love to write, so if it were suggested that you take a break, you’d probably wonder why – or how?  But as the year winds down this might be the perfect time to slow down a bit and refresh yourself for the New Year. So how does one shut down the thing they are passionate about?

Most writers at some point suffer from writer’s block, leaving them impotent and frustrated.  They are bewildered, wondering when that mojo or burst of creativity will return.  However, taking a little time to slow down and shift priorities, especially as the holidays approach, can be a voluntary act.  You can take ownership of not writing, knowing that you are allowing yourself to cleanse your mind and open it to new ideas and approaches.

To get your mind out of writing, replace it with something.  Take a vacation and explore the real world, rather than living in your own imagination.  Catch up with friends and family and see what others are doing, thinking, and feeling.  Volunteer some time with a charity or non-profit.  By helping others you feel good about yourself.  Consider changing some of your habits or routine and let a new type of schedule or pattern unfold.  Do some of the things you have been pushing off or holding back on.  Go out, move and touch the world.

Of course writers can’t stop thinking like writers.  We see drama unfolding all of the time.  We read a news story and think of an idea for a book.  We watch a movie and it inspires thoughts for a blog post.  We talk to other writers and it stimulates the writing brain.  So what do we do with these intellectual erections?

Make note of them but don’t act.

Instead of writing for your typical 30 minutes, two hours, or whatever, just jot down some ideas and store them away.  Use your time for observing, doing, interacting, and consuming content – the writing will come soon, but not yet.

Many writers would never think to take a break, but they usually reach a point of exhaustion or a lack of motivation.  One minute the writing flows like a waterfall and the next it’s a drought.  If you take time to recharge and step away from the thing you love, you will come back strong and productive.

You might say that this is a stupid strategy.  After all, who stops what they enjoy doing the most?  You may say that a break will come naturally, when the ideas run dry.  But when that happens, you get frustrated and fight harder to force things.  When the break comes of your own volition you’ve given yourself permission to relax and not feel any pressure to produce.  It’s a different frame of mind at play.

The end of the year, for me, is always a nice time.  People seem a little nicer to one another.  Everyone is exchanging presents.  We take some days off from work and maybe go somewhere.  We spend more time with family and friends.  It’s also a time for reflection on the past year and to set some goals for the new one.  You may also see it as a perfect moment to step away from your notebook or computer and live life so that you can be motivated to recreate it on paper.

Enjoy your break – and avoid a breakdown.

Catch The All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Holiday Lights Shine Upon Valuable Book Marketing Lessons



I recently took my family to see how a neighborhood that’s well-known for its holiday decorations dressed up for Christmas.  Dyker Heights in Brooklyn, New York has drawn the curious gawkers for the past three decades.  This mostly Italian enclave in a borough of a million ethnicities and cultures really goes all out every holiday season.  There’s a lesson or two to be applied to book marketing.

When you look at what gets attention, in this case it really is the big, the bright, the shiny, the new.  Each house individually, is fighting for attention.  How will each one stand out and differentiate itself?

Of course, the bigger the property or house that you have to work with, the better positioned you are to present a fat display of attractions, but even the smaller houses can get in on the act.  Lesson:  Make the most of what you have to work with.

Some houses clearly copy each other.  We saw a number of repeat light designs or props.  In trying to keep up with one another some really lose their uniqueness.  Lesson:  Borrow what works, but don’t overdo it – otherwise you lose your ability to stand out from a crowd.

Contrast and context are important. What your neighbor does with his property can influence how yours is perceived.  Sometimes homes clash, where two neighbors are blinding one another with overwhelming light power.  Those who have nabes that feature subtle displays or none at all help your house stand out. Lesson:  Present yourself in the context of others.  Know the setting you’re in and sell your book not in a vacuum but in the environment that’s out there.

Less can be more. When every inch of land and house is decked out it’s almost harder to appreciate than when you leave some space.  Write within the margins – otherwise your words just bleed all over the place.

Imagery is still important.  Santa, nutcrackers, elves, and blow-ups of popular cartoon characters and statues depicting the Nativity scene still rank high in displays.  Is there any imagery you can use to market your book or brand?

These enormous displays are special on their own, but when you cluster them it creates a unified effort to impress and entertain others.  Lesson:  If authors work together they have more power to draw a crowd and then each one gets some kind of benefit from it.

The last lesson may be the most important.  Aside from these generous homeowners spending thousands of dollars each to put people in a festive mood and volunteering to bring joy and happiness, it’s a smart move towards a long-term payoff.  Property values will rise from this.  The display gets people to discover the neighborhood and gives it a more appealing feel.  Authors too, must see their book publicity efforts in a similar light (pun intended).  

Writers market their brands and books not only to generate immediate sales or to share their wisdom. They also build a following and generate goodwill that can be cashed in down the road when they seek speaking engagements, to get a new book published, or to convert their network into consumers of other services or products.

Dyker Heights is a marvel and a freak show.  It not only brings good holiday cheer to all but it serves us some valuable book marketing insights along the way.  Happy Holidays!

Catch The All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Interview with author Beth Kellar Uniacke



Author’s Bio-Beth Kellar could be described as a wise optimist, having lived through the end of her twenty-eight year marriage and gone on to successfully build her own future. An interior designer by trade, she has previously published another book in the young readers sector. Born in New York, she now resides in Connecticut and is proud to still be as hopelessly romantic as ever.

SEATBELT REQUIRED: The Good, Bad, and Ugly Truth about Midde-Aged Dating

1. What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book?
This book actually started as a journal that I wrote in every day. It helped my frame of mind at a time when I was at the lowest point in my life. It was therapy for me. Once I moved past the sadness to acceptance, I made a conscious decision to let go of the past. I decided not to allow my previous relationship to keep me from looking for love a second time around. In my travels, I came across many men and women going through what I had gone through. I was saddened by the many men and women who would not date due to the fear of having their heart broken or a loss by divorce or death. I found myself encouraging them to put their fear aside in hopes of finding love again. Several of them have found love again and are now married or living with their partner. Seatbelt Required, is the book my experiences inspired me to write, in the hope that I can help others. I am and always will be as hopelessly romantic as ever.

2. What is it about and whom do you believe is your targeted reader?
Part memoir, part guide, it is a manual to help the over thirty-five single navigate their sudden entry into the adventurous world of modern day dating. It opens with the breakdown of my own marriage, past divorce and loss to new pastures. Beyond my own experiences, I offer plenty of practical advice about the do’s and don’ts of dating, Signs he is “Right’ for you and signs he is ‘Wrong’ for you, tips for a successful online dating experience, what men and women are looking for in a partner and my favorite Chapter 27 Funny, Embarrassing, Best, and Worst Date Stories.
My targeted reader is the over thirty-five single male & female who is considering dating.

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book? I hope this book inspires them to put their fears aside and jump in.  I am passionate in my belief that being in the right relationship with the right person is a wonderful, magical thing. All things in life have their ups and downs: jobs, family relationships, friendships, hobbies etc. Taking a chance to find love is so worth the risk!

What should remain with them- Courage and hope! I understand what they’re going through…I’ve been there. Many of us have found ourselves at a place we did not expect to be, but you are here, and it is the now. And now is all we have! Today is a new day that holds endless opportunities if we open our hearts and take a chance. It takes courage each time we dare to open a new door, but we must first close the door on yesterday. And no matter how dark it gets, there is happiness for those who don’t give up on finding it!

4. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow readers!
Live, love and let go of your past. Don’t let your past define you but instead refine you!
Each and every one of us are in charge of our future. The days ahead will be what you make them. You are in the driver’s seat, and whether the road ahead is smooth or bumpy, I encourage anyone that is fearful about dating to navigate their way through it…one date at a time!

5. What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry
is heading?

We see a rise in sales on mobile devices. More and more readers are using their tablets and mobile devices. The possible shifts from physical bookstores to the modern readers using iBooks. Ebooks are dominating the sales in books. 
There is a big increase in self-publishing. The Indie movement has empowered authors. The Indie author has the advantage because they can publish globally immediately. The traditional publishers are still trying to ignore the rise of self-published books even though they continue to loom over their heads.
Amazon $ sales of e-book show Self-published/ Indie published are taking almost half the market share. They are earning nearly half of the total author revenue from genre fiction sales on Amazon.

6. What great challenges did you have in writing your book?
The first would be not to embarrass my two adult children. Let’s face it, most kids do not want to hear about their parents dating experiences. My son told me up front… Mom, I’m so proud of you, but I will not be reading it. While on the other hand my daughter did read it and loved it!
Another challenge was sharing with my readers the breakdown of my marriage. I’m a very private person, but I felt it was very important for my readers to be able to connect with me on a personnel note. Sharing with them my own story of where I was then and where I am now shows them how your life can change for the better if you have the courage to fight for your happiness.

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?
 Seatbelt Required reaches out on a very real, personable level using humor and truth to guide my readers. The response to my book has been very positive! I wish I had read a book like this when I returned back on the dating scene after my 28 year marriage ended. It would have helped prepare me and lessen the anxiety I felt starting out. This book takes both a funny & honest peek into the world of middle-age dating. It talks the many benefits of dating including the undeniable health benefits. It also talks about the not-so positive reality that is associated with dating. No sugarcoating here…it tells the good, the bad, and the ugly truth about middle-age dating and why you still should date.
     

Catch The All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 
http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 



Interview with author Hale Bradt



Hale Bradt is the author of Wilber’s War (abridged): An American Family’s Journey through World War II (December 7, 2016).  As a Korean War veteran and an astrophysicist retired from M.I.T., he once searched for black holes, but turned to searching for family and wartime history. He has been intrigued by the Bradt family story for more than three decades, interviewing relatives, academic and military colleagues, and a Japanese officer against whom his father fought in the Solomon Islands. His discovery of his father’s letters from the Pacific gave him an unusual basis for exploring new aspects of World War II history, as he scoured the National Archives and even visited the Pacific battle sites where his father fought; there, he found the artifacts and people his father had known and written about. As a history buff and one who remembers WWII, Bradt is well qualified to provide a new context about a country at war.

1. What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book? Long after World War II, I came upon a few of my soldier dad’s (Wilber’s) wartime letters from the Pacific Theater. I found them to be of high literary quality: descriptive, poetic, loving, humorous, and technically accurate. Since, he had committed suicide shortly after returning home after the war, I realized then and there that if I could find more such letters, I would have a window into his life and psyche, into the Pacific War from the army perspective, and into the effects of war on families on the home front. Eventually, I found some 700 letters he had written, mostly to his wife, Norma, his parents, and his two children.

2. What is it about and whom do you believe us your targeted reader? It tells the story of a chemistry professor and National Guardsman who went to war as an artillery officer. He was overseas for three full years, went through three phases of combat in the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, and the Philippines and, at the war’s end, commanded an infantry regiment that was about to storm the beaches of mainland Japan. He was wounded twice and earned three Silver Star medals for personal heroism. It is also a story of his love for my mother, Norma, who faced great challenges of her own: supporting Wilber overseas with letters and shipments of needed items, looking after her children, managing the family finances, and dealing with her own infidelity that resulted in a pregnancy. It is a book for military families, including the spouses of service persons, and of course for those interested in the history of the Pacific War. Its army focus is in contrast to the oft-heard marine and navy accounts.

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book? What should remain with them long after putting it down? (1) A visceral memory of a three-year wartime odyssey through the western Pacific and (2) an awareness that war is terribly damaging to both the soldiers who are directly engaged and those who fight it on the home front.

4. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers? Interview the potential subjects of your writings and others associated with them early while they are still with us, and collect letters and other documents about them while they are still available. I first came upon my dad’s letters in 1980 when his siblings and many of his military and academic colleagues were still alive. My mother was still living at the time as were several of her siblings. I even interviewed a Japanese colonel who commanded the battalion that directly opposed my dad’s unit. Getting a sense of place is important also; I was able to visit the Pacific battlefields where my dad fought and met people he knew in the Philippines and New Zealand. All this is included in my book.

5. What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading? I have little experience in the industry, so I have little to offer, other than to note the increasing proliferation of publishing and marketing channels and the complexity of dealing with them. These can be overwhelming to the novice author. I have published two academic books with Cambridge Univ. Press, but this work, Wilber’s War, was published by myself through my one-man firm, Van Dorn Books. The first version of Wilber’s Was was a trilogy. Despite good reviews and three awards including two silver awards, it has sold only moderately well – its size is more than most readers want. This newer one-volume distillation, Wilber’s War (abridged) should fare better.

6. What great challenges did you have in writing your book? Except for one hurdle, I do not look back on the project as a series of challenges, because I had so much fun doing it, visiting and interviewing relatives, searching for photos and documents, visiting the Pacific battlefields. Of course, getting it on paper was a large job but I did it a bit at a time over the past few years. The one huge hurdle for me was whether or not to tell Norma’s story in full. One of my sisters had and still has deep reservations about the morality of my doing so. In my heart, I had those same reservations and, for decades, delayed putting it into publishable form. But as another sister said: “Hale, you must do this; it is everyone’s story.” So, I did.

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours? This work captures wartime in a factual dispassionate manner, not overly dramatized, as is so often the case. It exposes the inner thoughts of a soldier hero who could not go on with post-war life. It also reveals the trials of his lover on the home front. It is the story of two heroes—one male and one female— of World War II.


Catch The All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 
http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  

Interview With Author Michelle Oucharek-Deo


The Girl in the Peach Tree

Michelle Oucharek-Deo was born in British Columbia, Canada and continues to reside in BC with her husband, son and golden doodle, Lily. Michelle is a Registered Art Therapist and has been practicing in the field of Creative Arts and Counseling for over 22 years, offering guidance and support to individuals and families in her community. She started writing at the keen age of seven and enjoyed every unpublished moment of her writing career, but when the The Girl in the Peach Tree began to emerge, she knew it was time to jump, have courage and publish her first novel.



1. What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book?
“I spent my whole life writing and expressing myself through my short stories and journals. When I was eight my mom was diagnosed with a brain tumor. She survived the surgery, but lost most of her sight and was declared legally blind. I had to find ways to deal with the loss and change in my life, and my writing became the key. I turned to it as a lifeline and always dreamed of begin a writer and public speaker one day. But my life jumped and whirled and art therapy became the way that I helped others and expressed myself until, one day at 42, I needed more. I needed to become the woman that I was supposed to be and so I sat down and decided to write the 30 day novel; 1000 words a day. The rules identify that you are supposed to just keep writing and not review your work. After two days, I was already editing and hooked. I loved it!! Writing my story gave me such a level of joy as an individual, I knew I had to keep going. So I did. It was not easy fitting it all in; mother, wife, daughter, sister and therapist but who said the things we want in life are supposed to be easy, but I kept going… I knew I had to write, and I believed that the stories I could tell would make a difference in people’s lives.”

2. What is it about and whom do you believe is your targeted reader?
“The story is about a young woman; Maya, who grows up in a household where depression touched every aspect of her life. As an adult she discovers she needs more out of her life; more love, more adventure, more of everything! She doesn’t like the person who she sees in the mirror and realizes that something has to change. Fate sends her on a trip to Portugal and in the process she meets both a man whose heart has been aching to find the truest kind of love, and a group of woman who help her discover who she was meant to be. I believe true love and friendship, self-discovery and courage are the roots of this story.”
“When I started writing the book I thought my target market was for woman 18-40 years old. My first beta readers confirmed that I was on the right track. They loved it. The romance, adventure, mystery, the good-looking Portuguese flight attendant. I was hoping that the story could inspire woman to really look at themselves and have the courage to seek out their deepest truths and to experience pure joy. So, when my 13 year-old son begged me to read the story I was a little hesitant. Then my friend’s 14 year-old daughter stole it out of her room to read it. Neither of them could put it down. They loved it too but for very different reasons. I think the other surprise for me was when a male colleague almost 50, told me that ‘this was a very important book and the world needed to read it.’ He made me cry that day. It was the first time I really understood how far my story could reach and that women and men of all ages could relate to the universal themes that I touch on in the book.”

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book?
I hope that when a reader finishes my book they will walk away feeling like a kaleidoscope of color. Believing that true love and passion and a hope for a better life is just around the corner and that everyone deserves the experience of falling head over heels in love; yet the love alone does not define the characters, but gives them the energy and the drive to become better than they were before. That is what I hope for everyone! I am an old romantic who believes in true love and the possibilities of what it can bring to someone’s life.

4. What should remain with them long after putting it down?
My hope is that people see it as a powerful story of all different kinds of love. Romance, passion, family duty, and learning to love one self. So much fiction is meant only as a means to escape, and that is a wonderful gift to a reader but I believe that ‘The Girl in the Peach Tree’ is more than that and offers a fictional depth that will draw the reader in and when they reach the last page will leave them feeling that their investment of time and heart was well worth it.

5. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers?
·         Never give up.
·         Even on days when you think you are ready to throw your manuscript into recycling …keep going.
·         Find people who believe in you and what you are doing.
·         Pick a time and write every day.
·         Have the courage to read your story out loud. It makes a huge difference!!!!
·         If writing is your passion, then never let anyone or anything stop you.
·         And one last thing. You are a writer because you write, not because you are published!

6. What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?
I think technology will continue to evolve at amazing speeds, but that the creative process will always remain the same. Every writer has to go through it to get to the other side. I am also a believer that although e-books are the wave of the future, and most of our children read and process everything online, print has and should always have a place in the publishing world… at least for the next 100 years.

7. What great challenges did you have in writing your book?
Oh that is a great question. In general I have always been a confident person. Then came along the notion of writing this book. It was at that point that all the vulnerabilities and doubts and even my Grade 4 ‘C’ in spelling became an issue. I am laughing now, as I tell the story but, it wasn’t funny. There were many day of tears and fretting over my ability, and fearing that ‘ I couldn’t do it’ and then fearing, ‘What if I can?’  At one point in my process I was in a car accident; hit head on by a young woman who was texting. I was in pain and trying to heal and was so angry at her. I felt like she had taken away my ability to focus and create. In the end though, I took my 20 odd years of therapeutic experience and applied it to myself and made a choice. I decided that no matter what happened from there on out, I was going to write this story and not let anything stop me. I am glad that I did that, as only a year later my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer after never having smoked a day in her life and 10 months after that my father was diagnosed with ALS. So my challenges were plenty, but I faced them head on much like my main character and created the life that I wanted and finished the book.

8. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?
Simply, my book has the power to transport the reader away from their everyday lives and drop them into someone else’s. It can be read curled up by the fire or in an airport waiting lounge. The reader gets to experience love and adventure, exotic food, betrayal and a little bit of mystery. It is filled with characters you want to protect and others you want to destroy. I love all the characters, especially Jade, (she was so much fun to write!), and even after reading it for the 20th time I am still cheering for a happy ending…it must be the old romantic in me.

Catch The All-New 2017 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit 


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 
http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Why Are Digital Books Losing Ground?



According to research from industry associations, 70% of the revenue from music sales is from a digital source.  59% of the home video market revenue is from digital.  As those two areas continue to grow, digital book sales for trade publishers declined in 2015 to 20% of overall book trade revenue.  Why?

Digital music is embraced due to cost, availability, ease of use, and other factors.  Movie streaming or downloads comes for the same reason.  CDs, DVDs and the clunky devices used to listen and watch them seem to be on their way out.  But with books, people prefer paper – and are willing to pay more for it.

There may even be a digital backlash going on.

Everyone is so used to and dependent upon their devices.  They check them constantly.  The country just stares at technology all the time.  Click here, download that. From work to entertainment, from desktop and laptop to smartphones and tablets, screens of all sizes and shapes are everywhere.  We may even suffer eye fatigue and brain drain as a result of constantly being tethered to a device.

Digital content – audio, video, and text – is burdening us.  There is tons of free content out there – taking away time from potential book-buying readers.  It also negates some potential book sales.  After all, why pay for the milk when you get the cow for free? 

We are moving further into being a digital society.  There are lots of advantages to this but we can’t ignore certain realities, including:

·         Our fingers, eyes, and brains need a break from focusing on whatever comes from a digital device.
·         We need a physical world to co-exist along with digital – from human touch to brick and mortar stores to how we read our newspapers, magazines and books.
·         Even though online we feel next door to someone half way around the world, geography still matters.  We still live in a physical community – join it and be present.  Don’t just tune it out and disappear online.

There is evidence of a device peak.  A few studies a year ago shared:

·         40% own game controls – down from 2009.
·         14% own a portable gaming device – down from 2009.
·         73% own laptop or desktop computers down from 2012.
·         40% own MP3 players – down from 2010.
·         19% own e-book readers – down from 2013
·         45% own a tablet – that’s still rising, but at a much slower rate than just a few years ago.

Smart phone ownership is still growing.  68% of Americans have one.  Just 8% of the country does not have a cell phone.

We always hear the phrase:  “Think out of the box,” but many people feel they live in a digital box, always checking something on a device or screen.  We’re addicted.  We go from checking our smartphone to logging onto our laptop to streaming something to emailing a funny video link to posting on Facebook to scanning Twitter to sharing photos to shopping online to learning a new software program to downloading music to reading a blog to searching for people we haven’t spoken to in 15 years to…

It goes on and on.  From morning to night, disrupting the middle of things we should be engaged in.  Soon we will all have ADHD.

The printed book is a beautiful thing.  For people who read for pleasure, reading off-line could be a treat.  Some things have to be digital-blogs, email, movies…but something like a book gives us the option to consume content away from a screen or device. I know some people prefer e-books for a variety of reasons but apparently more people for more reasons prefer printed books.

Will we see a digital overload or backlash with other things?  Eventually, yes.  There’s just too much content to consume and not enough time, money or brain-span to process it all.  What could be the first to go or suffer?  We’ll see, but for now, print books look like they come out ahead when digital fatigue settles in.

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby 

Friday, December 2, 2016

Does Racism Keep The Bronx In The Dark Over Books?



According to research from, industry associations, 70% of the revenue from music sales is from a digital source.  59% of the home video market revenue is from digital.  As those two areas continue to grow, digital book sales for trade publishers declined in 2015 to 20% of overall book trade revenue.  Why?

Digital music comes due to cost, availability, ease of use and other factors.  Movie streaming or downloads comes for the same reason.  CDs, DVDs and the clunky devices used to listen and watch them seem to be on their way out.  But with books, people prefer paper – and are willing to pay more for it.

There may even be a digital backlash going on.

Everyone is so used to and dependent upon their devices.  The check them constantly.  The country just stares at technology all the time.  Click here, download that. From work to entertainment, from desktop and laptop to smartphones and tablets.  Screens of all sizes and shapes are everywhere.  We may suffer eye fatigue and brain drain as a result of constantly being tethered to a device.

Digital content – audio, video, and text – is burdening us.  There is tons of free content out there – taking away time from potential book-buying readers.  It also negates some potential book sales.  After all, why pay for the milk when you get the cow for free? 

We are moving further into being a digital society.  There are lots of advantages to this but we can’t ignore certain realities, including:

·         Our fingers, eyes, and brains need a break from focusing on whatever comes from a digital device.
·         We need a physical world to co-exist along with digital – from human touch to brick and mortar stores to how we read our newspapers, magazines and books that need to remain in print.
·         Even though online we feel next door to someone half way around the world, geography still matters.  You still live in a physical community –join it and be present.  Don’t just tune it out and disappear online.

There is evidence of a device peak.  A few studies a year ago shared:

·         40% own game controls – down from 2009.
·         14% own portable gaming device – down from 2009.
·         73% own laptop or desktop computers down from 20122.
·         40% own MP3 players – down from 2010.
·         19% own e-book readers – down from 2013
·         45% own a tablet – that’s still rising, but at a much slower rate than just a few years ago.

Smart phone ownership is still growing.  68% of Americans have one.  Just 8% of the country does not have a cell phone.

We always hear the phrase:  “Think out of the box,” but many people feel they live in a digital box, always checking something on a device or screen.  We’re addicted.  We go from checking our smartphone to logging into our laptop to streaming something to emailing a funny video link to posting on Facebook to scanning Twitter to sharing photos to shopping online to learning a new software program to downloading music to reading a blog to searching for people we haven’t spoken to in 15 years to…

It goes on and on.  From morning to night in the middle of things we should be engaged in.  Soon we will all have ADHD.

The reprinted book is a beautiful thing.  For people who read for pleasure, reading off-line could be a treat.  Some things have to be digital-blogs, email, movies…but something like a book gives us the option to consume content away from a screen or device. I know some people prefer e-books for a variety of reasons but apparently more people for more reasons prefer printed books.

Will we see a digital overload or backlash with other things?  Eventually, yes.  There’s just too much content to consume and not enough time, money or brain-span to process it all.  What could be the first to go or suffer?  We’ll see, but for now, print books look like they come out ahead when digital fatigue settles in.


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Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2016 ©.
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