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Friday, April 17, 2015

Publishing Facts You Probably Don’t Know


·         In 1885, 4,500 book titles were published in America.
By 1989, 45,000 new book titles were published.
In 2009, 1,335,000 new titles were released in the U.S.

·         There are over 7,000,000 books available for sale.

·         52% of all books are not sold in bookstores – they are sold by mail order, online, through book clubs, or in warehouse stores.

·         A decade ago, in 2004, 1.2 million book title sales were tracked by Nielsen Bookscan and only 25,000 titles sold more than 5,000 copies each.  Some 950,000 sold fewer than 99 copies.

·         First-time authors write 75% of the new nonfiction books published each year.

·         85% of all new titles published each year are non-fiction and 15% are fiction.

·         Chicken Soup for the Soul, with sales of over 8,000,000 copies, spawned a series that includes more than four score best-selling books.  It was rejected by 144 publishers.

·         Ray Bradbury received 700 rejections before any of his work was published.

·         A Time to Kill by John Grisham was rejected 45 times.  Stephen King’s debut novel, Carrie, was declined 30 times.  Even J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was rejected – 14 times!  Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell was declined by 38 publishers.

·         Sales of romance books top any other genre by far, within fiction.  Women make up 90.5% of the romance readership.  In 2014, romance books brought in $1.438 billion in revenue.  Mystery brought in half of that.  Classic literary fiction revenue is a third of what romance generates.

·         In Book Publishing 101, Martha Marda notes this about book publishing’s history:

·         “Until around 1439, when Johannes Gutenberg invented a printing press using a winepress and movable type, books were copied by hand and were owned by churches, monasteries, and wealthy families.  Most books were copied on animal vellum (usually treated calfskin).  The concept of paper, a much more suitable material for mechanical printing presses, was imported from Asia, where books were printed using hand-carved wood blocks.  By 1500, 1,000 printing shops in Europe had produced 35,000 titles and 20 million copies.  The Frankfurt Book Fair, today the world’s largest trade fair for books, originated during the 1400s as a medieval fair where booksellers and printers could display their wares and buy the supplies they needed for their print shops.”

Additional Stats, Facts, & Quotes of Interest

1.      Robbie K. Baxter, in The Membership Economy revealed these statistics that show us how technology has penetrated our lives:

·         Ninety-nine percent of all adults have their mobile phone within arm’s reach every hour of every day.
·         There are 6.8 billion people on the planet, and 4 billion of them use a mobile phone.  Only 3.5 billion of them use a toothbrush.
·         Every minute, 100 hours of video are uploaded on YouTube by individual users.
·         Ninety percent of text messages are read within three minutes of being delivered.
·         The average 21-year-old has spent 5,000 hours playing video games; sent 250,000 emails, instant messages, and text messages; and has spent 10,000 hours on a mobile phone.

2.      B. Alan Bourgeois, director of Texas Association of Authors, revealed in C-Spot Magazine that writers need to be active participants in the marketing of their books: He wrote:

“In today’s marketplace, you have to do much more than authors of the bygone years did.  You must be willing to risk everything and spend ten times as many hours selling your book than it took to write it.  And that is where most authors fail.  It’s not even the willingness to work hard to sell the book, it’s the fear issue of losing everything if it doesn’t became a best seller. Reality is that your first book will not be a best seller, but you need to work just as hard so that your next book, or the third or fourth or even the twentieth book becomes the best-seller.  For when one of them does, then they all become a best-seller.”

3.      Forbes says the US has 513 billionaires.  7.1 millionaires live here, says Boston  Consulting Group.

4.       By 2050 it’s estimated that 31.4% of the world will be Christian and 29.7% will be Muslim.  14.9% will be Hindus and 5.2% will be Buddhists.  Just one in 500 will be Jewish.  The group that will grow the fastest, from 2010 to 2050, will be Muslims – jumping by 73%.  Buddhists are the only major religion expected to not show growth, declining by .3%.

READ UP!
Writers, please never violate these three rules!

How much longer should outdated phrases last?

The new book reading experience: 1915 vs. 2015

Great quotations to lift your writing

Amazing New Photography Book Culls 4 Million Images Into 1,100


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015

Why Your Book Isn’t Selling



Every author wants to see his or her book make best-seller lists, get reviewed by The New York Times, and to favorably impact the world.  At the very least, they want to break even in their venture, and where possible, sell enough books to be in the red.  But the vast majority of authors are bound to question why they don’t have more sales than they think they deserve.  


Here are some reasons why your book may not be selling well.  Which ones represent your situation?  Which ones can be fixed – and will be fixed?  Is it time to throw in the towel after adding up your shortcomings -- or you can take corrective action?

1.      Your book sucks.  It’s horrible.

2.      Your book looks too ugly – the cover is a mess and/or the layout, font or typeface size challenges readers.

3.      The price is too high.

4.      Your distribution access is poor.

5.      You have had many negative reviews that are not balanced out by plenty more positive ones.

6.      You lack a website – or a BUY button/link on the site.

7.      It’s way too long or short for the tastes of most people.

8.      It focuses on a subject that is neither interesting, likeable, needed, nor desired.

9.      Your pool of potential readers is small, due to the niche content.

10.  Your genre is overcrowded with better, more popular writers, who outmarket you.

11.  You haven’t advertised your book.

12.  You don’t blog often – or at all -- about your book.

13.  You fail to grow your social media – or to use it to market your book.

14.  Your family tells you the book is not so good.

15.  Your book was poorly edited and spelling or grammatical errors fill every other page.

16.  The title is so confusing or not representative of what it’s really about.

17.  You haven’t applied for any awards.

18.  You don’t speak anywhere to talk about the book – not even bookstores or libraries.

19.  You haven’t drummed up interest by giving out free copies to get reviews and testimonials.

20.  You don’t seek out opportunities to guest-post about your book.

21.  You haven’t initiated a media campaign to reach out to newspapers, radio shows, TV stations, magazines, newsletters, or online reviewers, bloggers, and major websites.

22.  You haven’t pursued bulk sales or reached out to organizations that should have an interest in your book.

READ UP!
Writers, please never violate these three rules!

How much longer should outdated phrases last?

The new book reading experience: 1915 vs. 2015

Great quotations to lift your writing

Amazing New Photography Book Culls 4 Million Images Into 1,100


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Do You Practice Word of Mouth Marketing?


I just came across an advance review copy of the latest edition of Word of Mouth Marketing by Andy Sernovitz.  It’s worth your time.

The author founded the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (www.WordofMouth.org).  His book and organization is geared to serving companies and helping them to generate customers for free.  But his book is certainly applicable to authors who seek to build a brand and sell more books.

Word of Mouth Marketing is what it sounds like – getting others to talk about you and endorse enthusiastically what you do.  It’s not a paid advertisement, it’s not telemarketing, and it’s not pushing stuff in an unsolicited way.

There are five principles to Word of Mouth Marketing, according to the book.

1. Talkers
Find people who will talk about you.  They may be fans, customers, bloggers, volunteers, influencers, friends, and family. Find people who influence others, such as a teacher vs. a parent, a company manager vs. an employee, or a coach instead of one player.

2. Topics
Give people a reason to talk about you.  What will do this?  Having a great book, giving a special offer, or exhibiting a cool, unique or quirky style – voice – character.

3. Tools
Help the message spread faster and farther.  Help things by blogging, sending viral emails, asking others to tell others, using coupons, and holding online discussions.

4. Taking Part
Join the conversation.  Reply to feedback or comments.  Participate in social media and join discussions.

5.  Tracking
Measure and understand what people are saying.  Search blogs, read online discussions, listen to feedback, and use advanced measurement tools.

Sernovitz narrows it down to these three reasons as to why people will talk about you and they are as follows:

·         It’s about you – they love you, love the book.
·         They feel smart and important when expressing themselves about you.
·         They feel part of a group or team that is aligned with you.

So what happens when people talk about you but not to praise you?  They trash you, rip your book apart, attack you personally, and treat you like a plague!

“People will say bad things about you,” writes the author.  “In fact, it’s already happening.  So what do you do?  The worst thing you can do is nothing.  If you’ve got a negative word of mouth problem, it’s not going away by itself.  People will keep talking; negative stories will keep spreading, and it will forever damage your reputation.  If you don’t get involved, It’s going to get worse.”

But the answer is not to necessarily get revenge on the naysayers or to confront the critics.  “The solution to negative word of mouth is more word of mouth marketing,” writes Sernovitz.

He suggests a number of defenses.

First, let your fans defend you.  Second, build credibility and good will before you need to cash it in.  Third, don’t be caught by surprise.  Anticipate what could be your perceived weak spots and address them in advance.

If you respond to an attack, he offers these six strategies:

1.      Respond calmly and offer to help.
2.      Do not get into a fight.
3.      Be human and don’t sound canned.
4.      Correct the record – tell people what you did to address a concern.
5.      Follow up and deliver on your promises.
6.      Do something wonderful and surprise your critic with a gift or personal apology.

Word of Mouth Marketing shows us that in addition to – not instead of – advertising, publicity, and marketing -- one must go out there and talk things up and hope that others will do the same.

READ UP!
Writers, please never violate these three rules!

How much longer should outdated phrases last?

The new book reading experience: 1915 vs. 2015

Great quotations to lift your writing

Amazing New Photography Book Culls 4 Million Images Into 1,100


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

IBPA Publishing University Lessons


I recently attended Publish University, a long-time annual event put on by Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA), in Austin, Texas.  Some 280 people attended, seeking out knowledge, connections, and direction.  Events like this one and organizations like IBPA offer a wonderful opportunity for those in the industry, from first-time authors to book printers, to learn from one another.

I was there to represent the book publicity firm that I work for and to harness new relationships while building on existing ones.  It was the ideal place to be, as a book promoter, speaking with hundreds of potential clients or referral sources.

 It’s important to attend conferences such as these, especially for writers who feel isolated or publishers and industry professionals who wonder what’s out there.  By talking, watching, and listening to others, we grow not only our business, but our awareness and knowledge base.

IBPA is a good organization for helping writers and publishers to feel connected and informed.  But the in-person gathering is something that truly gives depth to our online interactions.  I don’t see the role of conferences diminishing in the near future, even though we are told the Internet will make gatherings of people in a room unnecessary.

The event had breakout sessions on topics of concern to today’s indie publishers and authors, including:

·         Producing high-quality ebooks on a budget.
·         Building author platforms with social media and publicity.
·         Let’s edit that out (loud).
·         The act of making books.
·         Making the most of book awards.
·         Profitable sales beyond bookstores and libraries.
·         Copyright clarity.
·         What you need to know to get your ebook distributed (with or without Amazon).

What people come away with from such conferences is usually a good, inspired feeling.  They feel back on a path, filled with renewed motivation, direction, and a sense of purpose.  Maybe that’s what’s best – aside from the benefits stated earlier.

The book publishing industry is one of ideas and content, but it’s also very much one of people and personalities.  When we get a huge room filled with the intelligent, passionate, and creative people of our industry, you are bound to come away richer for it.  Seek out a conference that’s right for you – you’ be glad for doing so.

READ UP!
Writers, please never violate these three rules!

How much longer should outdated phrases last?

The new book reading experience: 1915 vs. 2015

Great quotations to lift your writing

Amazing New Photography Book Culls 4 Million Images Into 1,100


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Schatz Photography Book Culls 1,100 Best Images from 4 Million

          
 

You have not truly seen the world until you have witnessed the illuminating photography of Howard Schatz. The internationally critically-acclaimed, award-winning photographer is one of the most prolific artists of his time. His new two-book set, Schatz Images: 25 Years, (Glitterati, June, 2015; www.schatzimages25years-glitterati.com) captures breathtaking images that will fascinate those who love original, cutting-edge photographs.

Perhaps Vanity Fair Editor-in-Chief Graydon Carter says it best: “Howard Schatz is so versatile that this volume at times seems like the work of a dozen photographers, Weegee, Avedon, Penn, Beaton, Newton, and Goude, among them. He has affection for his subjects—athletes, dancers, models, actors, pregnant moms, and interesting nobodies—and it shows in every remarkable image. Sometimes funny, often dramatic, he is a master both of the quiet portrait and the explosive surprise.”

Schatz’s work ranges from world-class athletes and dancers to actors acting and portraits of homeless people, from stunning images made in light and pattern to studies of pregnancy and newborns. There is no other photographer in the world who has explored such an enormous range of subject matter and no other book like Schatz Images: 25 Years. The elegant and luxurious two-book boxed set includes work from the course of the last 25 years. Each of the volumes is 12x12 inches, and together they contain 832 pages and 1083 original and sumptuous photographs. The beautifully bound set is stored in a custom slipcase, limited to 500 signed and numbered copies.

His work has been published in 20 books and exhibited in numerous galleries and museum exhibitions worldwide and is contained in innumerable private collections. His images are regularly featured in illustrious publications such as The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Time, Sport Illustrated, Vogue, GQ, and The New Yorker. Schatz has worked with such prominent clients as Ralph Lauren, Escada, Sergio, Nike, Reebok, Sony, and Mercedes-Benz, and he’s won nearly every award in his field.

Some of the subjects featured in the set include: Dance ,        Underwater Studies, Athletes, Fashion & Beauty, Actors, Models &Their Moms, Motion Studies, Botanical, Pregnancy, and Liquid Light Studies.

Prior to becoming a photographer as he neared age 50, the scientist-turned-artist was an internationally renowned ophthalmologist and Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco. 

This is the second book of Schatz's that I have helped to promote to the media, with the help of the PR firm that I work for. Getting to know his work is a tremendous honor.

Below is a Q and A with the legendary, masterful photographer:

1.    1.      The pair of books that make up the retrospective cover an array of topics, from Hollywood celebrities and professional athletes to portraits of homeless people and studies of pregnancy.  Which subject matter proved to be the most challenging but rewarding to shoot? Why? Every project I did was an exploration, a treasure hunt. I photograph to surprise and delight myself. I am looking for wonder. I worked creatively to capture something special in every subject. Finding something I had never seen before was my bar, the metric by which I would judge my work. The hard work we put into the creative process is a marvelous journey that brings great satisfaction and joy.

2.   To what do you attribute your success of generating amazing images that capture the human spirit, a feeling, or a moment? I am interested in people, motion, and the human body; in dance, sports, as well as the veracity of a great face. I think my curiosity and passion to find things I hadn't seen before informed the finding and making of these images.

3.   A large number of famous actors and award-winning actresses came to your studio and you were able to direct them in a one-on-one improvisation, allowing them to create a whole range of characters for your camera. How did Michael Douglas, Colin Firth, Jane Lynch, Sissy Spacek among a hundred others come to participate in this project? I initially did an interview with each actor about ideas and creativity. The long interview allowed each actor to become comfortable with me as a director, so that when we worked on the character improvisations, they really gave it their all. I asked each actor to use his/her imagination --as well as his/her bodies and voice -- to develop each character. They then worked hard, improvisationally and extemporaneously to make images that were fantastic. 

4.   Do you set out to capture iconic images on every shoot? What is it that you strive to achieve?  It is a treasure hunt.  I set up my studio in such a way that I am open to anything that happens.  There is no ultra-control of things, I let ideas flow freely, coming in and out - I'm willing to try anything. This is the creative process; it is not a preconceived notion that I am trying to get but rather an idea I wish to explore. I talk about the creative tree: one climbs the tree and sometimes goes out on a branch that seems promising, but it cracks and one falls to the ground. But the grass is soft, so one gets right back up on the tree trunk and finds another branch.  Occasionally, there is a branch with many pieces of fruit to pick. We look for these gold veins, we look for these things that happen in the studio that seem to yield magic and wonder and surprise and rapture.

5.   One of your trademark approaches is to distort your subject. You seem to get close up and make parts of your subject look larger and out of proportion. Why? Sometimes I want to emphasize something and will place the camera and use a lens in such a way to emphasize or diminish specific characteristics.  I am interested in motion and use both stroboscopic flash as well as ambient available light and leave the camera open to see what happens over the course of time rather than shooting a picture every time at one 1000th of the second.  This is the study of a particular kind of motion and I apply it to dance and sports.  I find it extremely fascinating and interesting; it seems that almost every picture comes out differently. Always a surprise.



6.   How do you go about making images that surprise us? My goal is to make pictures that are surprising to me. I am looking for that which is wondrous for me.  Casting is also very important in photography; I need subjects that can follow directions.  A photograph is as good as its weakest part, and therefore having great subjects for whatever idea is being photographed is essential.

7.   B & W or color? How do you know when to use which and for what effect? Black-and-white leaves more to the imagination than color. Color is more literal. Nowadays we shoot everything in color and if I feel an image would be stronger in black-and-white, I simply convert it in post-production. Today, technology allows anyone to make a pretty good picture. But to make a picture that’s spectacular, rare, unique, magnificent, fantastic and long-lasting is extremely difficult and takes great effort, generally a fair amount of experience, certainly tremendously hard work and a great amount of luck.

8.   Howard, you left behind a successful career as a world-renowned retina specialist to turn your eye towards photography. In either role, were you seeking to heal us, to help us to see things in a better way? In medicine it is important to get it exactly right, but in art it's often about making mistakes. The two are very different. In medicine, it's important not to take chances, not to get wild and creative; but in art it is very important to take chances and to go into the unknown. Medicine has taught me a great deal.  I've learned to make strangers comfortable as I did with my patients. Medicine taught me to study things scientifically, which I applied when learning various technical challenges in the studio. The two seem to overlap in many ways, but they are mostly extremely different.

9.  You have photographed prisoners and club-goers, fashion models, and Cirque Du Soleil, and featured the brutality of boxing alongside the innocence of cherubic babies. How do you reconcile your divergent, sometimes conflicting tastes for subjects? I am interested in everybody and everything.  I am as interested in great successes as I am the opposite.  I have done many projects searching to learn something about humanity.

10. Why is the human body an inexhaustible source of interest to you?  There are so many ways of seeing the body, of capturing images of the body, of doing things with my camera and lighting with great bodies. I want to continue to do this as I feel that although I am way beyond just touching the surface, there still is a long way to go.

11  Your chapter on body knots is unreal. Tell us what went into that. I was photographing dance one day when the dancers were together resting after some trampoline work.  They were very comfortable with each other, holding each other close.  I had a wide angle lens in my hand, and I came in close to look at them and I saw something I had never seen.  This is something that only bodies can make: a sculpture of form.  I began to study the body knots generally with pairs of dancers. The project was fascinating and fun.


       

   
   A BUDDING PHOTOGRAPHER?

     
     My son, who is just 10 years old, is always thinking of ways to express his creativity. He is curious about a lot of things. I want to encourage this. He recently set upon photography and put together this fast-paced slide show of photographs that he snapped off from the past two months. He would love for you to view his work, and if you feel so moved, to "like" it. The whole thing takes three minutes and I think is worth the time.  I hope you enjoy it: http://youtu.be/ZERbhc4yYE0 -- thank you.


DON’T MISS: ALL NEW RESOURCE OF THE YEAR

2015 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit: All New

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015


Monday, April 13, 2015

How Long Will Outdated Phrases Last?


What will replace once popular expressions or idioms that are used by the masses?

While reading a book that identified and explained the origins of hundreds of such phrases, Spilling The Beans on the Cat’s Pajamas by July Partinson, you can’t help but wonder how long many of these phrases will last given how irrelevant they are.

For instance, “strike when the iron is hot” is used in conversation today to indicate one should take advantage of the opportunity before them, but who knows from things like striking an iron?  Has anyone seen a blacksmith in action of late?

“Sleep tight” stems from when beds were made of rope and straw.

“Read the riot act” goes back to a 1715 British law.

“Have him over a barrel” is from the trenches of World War I.

“A feather in one’s cap” dates to ancient customs.

See a pattern here?  The meaning of the phrase holds relevance, but the actual phrase sounds outdated.

I’m sure new phrases will develop and last a bit, but maybe not as long.  Technology seems to drive our lives – professionally, socially, and entertainment.  Maybe we’ll come up with phrases to replace the old.

Phrases that may stick around would be ones that stem from the Bible.  But I find a lot of phrases come from sports and pop culture.  In fact, it seems our society is littered with references to characters and lines from movies, plays, TV shows, and books – even commercials and catchy advertisements.

Are these still worthy of usage?

“Pleased as punch”
“Paint the town red”
“In fine fettle”
“Dear John letter”
“Clutching at straws”
“What is good for the goose, is good for the gander”
“What the Dickens?”
“Three sheets to the wind”
“The 64,000-dollar question”
“The sands are running out”

Many phrases came to be because they referenced something natural, something common, and something seemingly true and powerful.  But we’ve replaced nature and references to it with factory, mass-produced gadgets and robots.  We’ve replaced the common experience with individualized, specialized, segmented ones.  Look at tonight and see people doing one of a hundred things.  No one is on the same page because we’re all reading different books – or no books at all.

But there are human traits and characteristics that we all share.  We know of emotions and of principles like honesty, love, and charity.  We may have a fragmented culture but we all know from the existence of major things such as sports, politics, crimes, wealth, etc.  Our phrases that will come to be will develop from the aspects of life that we each come to experience and understand.  A Latin girl who plays soccer may seem to be so far off from the Iraqi jihadist engaged in violence. Both may seem foreign to the American businessman or the Japanese intellect.  But they all know from life and death, family and food, and a thousand other common points.  It’s from those points that new idioms will sprout.

I’m okay with seeing “have a field day,” “save one’s bacon” and “thick as thieves” disappear from the lexicon but I hope their replacements only stick around for as long as they remain relevant.  The worst thing would be to keep using phrases that no longer are so obvious, timely, and reflective of the message that was being conveyed.

DON’T MISS: ALL NEW RESOURCE OF THE YEAR

2015 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit: All New


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Writers: Never Violate Three Rules!


Pete Rose, one of the greatest baseball players of all time, has submitted an appeal of his 26-year-old lifetime ban from Major League Baseball.  He’s hoping the ban will be lifted, leaving him eligible for consideration as a candidate for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  He broke the cardinal rule of betting – on his team – while managing a team.  I wonder what sins or cardinal rules guide us in regards to writing books, promoting them, or marketing books. How about these three?

First Rule
Thou shall not make up a story (unless it’s fiction!).

Second Rule
Thou shall not plagiarize.

Third Rule
Thou shall make sure the book is edited and spell-checked properly.

After that, there are general rules to follow when it comes to selecting a title, designing a cover, figuring the length of the book, and pricing it.  There are certain times of the year some books should be released and there are certain guidelines as to which format best fits its content.  But none of this compares to the first three rules.

If you break the first one, you are discredited.  If you ignore rule two, you can be discredited, too.  Both could lead to lawsuits and public shaming, not to mention professional suicide.  The third one shouldn’t happen but can be forgiven.

Rose, who collected more base hits than any one of the 20,000 men to play baseball at its highest level since the 1869 founding of the league, won a number of World Series rings and was a perennial all-star who was popular over a career that spanned nearly 25 years.  But in 1989 he was dumped from baseball.  The baseball commissioner who imposed the ban died just days later, forever leaving Rose in limbo.

Many still believe he did something so wrong that he does not deserve to be in a special category of elite athletes.  Others separate what he did post-playing days and believe he’s suffered long enough.  In the world of book publishing, how forgiving or understanding can we be when it comes to writing lies, copying the words of others, or putting out a grammatically-challenged book?

Sometimes we forgive people, but in a different way than they’d expect.  For instance, some people who succeed at being screw-ups, like a drunken actor or an abusive singer, get second careers because of the fame attached to their poor behavior.  Look at reality shows like Celebrity Apprentice, where being a loser is a resume-qualifier for the show.   Writers may want to be famous, but no one really should strive for infamy.

DON’T MISS: ALL NEW RESOURCE OF THE YEAR

2015 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit: All New


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2015