Follow by Email

Monday, April 22, 2019

Authors, You’re In Business!



Remember, you’re a business entity.  You sell books, information, ideas, advice, and expertise.  As a business, adhere to some standards:

·         Keep accurate records
·         Create an advisory board
·         Protect your intellectual property -- use copyrights, trademarks and patents
·         Use written contracts and have an attorney review what you’re  about to sign
·         Make sure your contract avoids misunderstandings, identifies who does what by when, assures payment, avoids liability, and clearly states what is being agreed to

In Entrepreneurship:  Starting and Operating a Small Business, Second Edition, by Steve Mariotti and Caroline Glackin, several business plan software packages are identified.  These can help you focus on treating yourself as a business:

To learn more about the latest technology that can help your business efforts, consult: www.techweb.com


Do You Need Some Market Research?
Big companies spend millions researching and analyzing the marketplace.  You can’t afford the time or money to do this.  But thanks to the Internet, you can find a lot of information about your potential customer.

You may not be able to conduct a phone survey of 1,000 people, but you can find out about the buying habits and needs of the American public online.  You can look into the habits of people based on geography, demographics, book reading patterns, etc.  A harder thing to do is to measure what’s still relevant is the behavioral or psychological patterns that people operate under.  Reading up on pop psychology may provide insight on how people tend to act or react under a given situation.  Even certain words can trigger emotional responses, so take that into your consideration when marketing to others.  A lot is common sense, but it helps to know more about the people you market to in order to get more yeses.


Keeping Track
Marketing, like life, gets filled with to-do lists and lots of random notes that need a home. How will you keep track of people, calendar events, things to check out, etc?  Many people are disorganized – scribbled notes on napkins, old emails stored somewhere, online calendars mixed with hand-written planners. We all try to create a system that works but we start to lose track, get lazy in maintaining it, or find ourselves simply to be our worst enemy. That said, don’t give up.


For marketing purposes, you will need to be organized about the following:
·         Keeping a list of your ideas
·         Listing web sites or people you want to check out
·         Your invoices and accounts receivable
·         Bills you need to pay
·         A marketing plan
·         A budget
·         A publicity plan
·         Daily to-do list
·         Calendar of appointments
·         Address book of key contacts
·         Setting deadlines
·         Reminder to follow-up or reach out to certain people – with notes on what was said and done
·         A place to keep resources that you uncover
·         A collection of articles and blogs that you plan to read
·         Notes for things you plan to blog about

The list can go on and on. You may do a lot of this on your phone or computer but rarely is everything neatly in one place. Just be sure to update the system that you create for yourself and print/copy/or back it up regularly. And know that you will never be perfect in this area, but learn to prioritize and be on top of the bread and butter things.

Also, Make Note Of These Rules For Managing Your Cash:
1.      Get paid upfront or collect payment as quickly as possible. Never assume what you invoice for will always get paid.  Every business has debt-collection problems.  Be prepared to get stiffed at least a few times a year.

2.      Always know your cash balance and keep track of planned receivables and of bills that are due.  Don’t get caught short or off guard simply because of poor record-keeping or overly optimistic assumptions.

3.      Delay, bill payment as long as possible – always stretch out the terms – but don’t alienate vendors or incur penalties in doing so.  Prioritize your bills and pay what’s most overdue first or pay what’s most important first.

4.      Seek to negotiate the best possible deal – on everything, all the time.  Don’t be afraid to ask for a discount or to counter-offer when buying something.  Everything is negotiable and everyone in business knows this.

Keep Good Records Of Expenses And Income So You:
·         Can do your taxes with ease and avoid an audit
·         Keep track of cash flow
·         Analyze activity and review ROI
·         Will be able to examine which areas need attention.

Consult with an accountant as to which business structure you should operate under (sole proprietorship vs. LLC or S Corporation for example).  Obtain the proper documents or federal employer identification number for the business.  You may need to collect sales tax and pay it to the government, so look into whether you need to obtain a sales and use tax registration number.

What Will People Pay?
·         People will pay what they think it is worth.
·         They will pay what they are told to pay.
·         They pay what they can afford.
·         They pay for perceived value of your offer vs. perceived value of competing offers.
·         They will pay for comfort, security, piece of mind, ease.
·         They will pay for relief to a problem.
·         They will pay out of fear, guilt or pleasure.
·         They will pay because they don’t know any better.
·         They will pay to avoid a greater loss or payment later.
·         They will pay a premium if they like you, if they are attracted to you, if they think you like them and care about them and understand them.

You set your price and you can  choose to negotiate downward. It is up to you. Make sure you understand the value delivered by you, your book, your services, your brand. As long as you can articulate your value in a confident way you won’t have to shy away from or apologize for your price. By knowing your customer’s perception of competitive substitutes and alternatives you can get into their heads about how you compare.

Perhaps author Jeffrey J. Fox says it best in regards to price, in his book, How to Become a Marketing Superstar: “Price your products or selves according to the value the customer receives from the product. Do not price your product based on its production cost plus a markup. Do not price your product solely according to supply and demand. (Even the most basic commodities can be differentiated and priced to value. And gouging customers who need plywood during a hurricane may produce short-term profits but will long be remembered by the customer base). Do not automatically price your product to mirror competitive pricing. Do not price your product below cost.”

Here are a few more things to consider:
·         Put a dollar value on your time and keep increasing it.
·         Seek the quickest and easiest ways to get clients and customers.
·         Always look for cheaper ways to market yourself.
·         Sell your solution – the result of what people will get if they read your book or hire you as a speaker/consultant
·         Quantify and monetize that solution and all secondary benefits.

You are an author -- and a business! Take ownership of it.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
How Book Publishers Grow Their Brand & Sales With Their Authors’ Help
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/04/how-book-publishers-can-brand.html

How Authors Get Bulk Sales Now

A podcast on book publicity that you need to listen to today

How Authors Can Market To Libraries Successfully

Unfu*k Your Book marketing

How Authors Get A Yes Out Of Others

Some key principles to rally your book marketing around

How to write powerful, effective book advertising copy that sells tons of books

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.









Sunday, April 21, 2019

To Be Successful As A Book Marketing Writer



Bookshelves are filled with self-help books, so I won’t profess to be a self-help guru, but I can tell you from reading hundreds of them that they all have a number of principles in common.  These principles are applicable to anyone, no matter their situation, but are especially true if you are to advance as a writer, speaker, and consultant.

1.Get Out Of Your Mental Jail.  You don’t realize it, but you set all kinds of limits, rules and boundaries for yourself.  You set rigid expectations, make demands of yourself, and force yourself to adhere to out-of-date standards that may have at one point worked for you. Take time to do a self-analysis of what has been pushing your buttons or guiding your actions.  It may be time to let go of some oppressive ideas.

2.Get Healthy And Rested.  Easier said than done.  The nation is filled with addictions, obesity, lack of sleep, poor diets, and disease. But if you can make some improvements in terms of your energy level, you’ll feel better and be in a more productive position.  Get more sleep, eat less junk, and take some stress-busting walks.

3.Expose Yourself To New Things.  This doesn’t mean go shopping, although it may help.  The only way to grow is to keep exposing yourself to new people, new places, new ideas, and new pieces of information.  Instead of doing more of the same, think of how you can try a new restaurant, join a new group, and learn about a subject you know nothing about.

4.Change How You Do Things.  See if there’s a better or different approach to how you handle problems and challenges. Old responses just get the same results.  Don’t be satisfied with the way things are – experiment.  Also consider changing your environment – clean up, paint, or build something – get a wardrobe makeover.

5.Travel.  Go anywhere.  Take a bus 20 minutes away or fly halfway around the world.  The more you get out of your day-to-day existence, the more inspired you’ll be by what you see.

6.Negotiate New Terms With Yourself.  Set higher standards, demand more of yourself.  Or if you feel overworked, scale down and allow yourself to slow down.  Give yourself permission not to be a workaholic.

7.Avoid Toxic People.  We all know such people – they are family, co-workers, friends, and people in our life who are drains on our energy, time, and money.  They are always in a crisis, always sick, lacking something, looking for help, or needing lots of support.  Depending on your relationship to the person, you can’t just walk away from them but try to decrease your exposure to them, like you’d avoid a virus.  Be at arm’s length.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
How authors get their book marketing mojo – and avoid failure

Authors cannot succeed without the right attitude

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

Should You Promote Your Book By Yourself?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Do You Have Time to Write – and Live?




It’s easy to tune out the world and just spend a lifetime writing and reading books.  But the ideal would be to have both – to experience life firsthand AND to interpret it with your writings AND to get lost in different or better worlds that books provide us.  Is this really possible?

Factors are time, money, and the human capacity for creating, experiencing, and observing.

Let’s look at all of them:

Time:  How do you schedule your most precious commodity so that you can do what you need to do, what you want to do, and to write, and to read?

Money:  It goes hand in hand with time.  You need time to make money and money allows you to have time to read and write – and to experience life.

Human Capacity: It requires a shift in our emotional state to observe via book and not participate in life, and then to participate in life with risks and rewards, and then to have the creative ability to funnel your experiences, observations, and dreams into your writings.

We, as humans, have been trying to figure out forever how we can balance work and play, writing and living, learning and doing. It’s a challenge that few of us have been able to meet.

Sometimes it seems like a vicious cycle.  We work to gain money so that we can afford to not work and have more time to experience, explore, read, and write – but the more we don’t work, the more likely we’ll run out of resources, thus, requiring us to work some more.

Being human is a multi-dimensional experience. A part of us wants to take and be given things while another part wants to be charitable, help others, and give back to society.  We find humor and reward in work – and yet we dream of vacations, sleep, and time to just lounge.  We like to read about a better life or world, but then we want to be the one to help create it, both with actions and our writings.  I guess we are always in some state of want or imbalance.  To be human is to never really be satisfied.

But to be human is to always deny the reality we feel confronted by.  We look to change things, make adjustments, and rearrange our surroundings.  Sometimes we destroy more than nurture, dismiss more than love, and lose more than gain.  But we are curious, creative, and compassionate, so if our actions can be driven more by those things than greed, ignorance, or selfishness, we’ll grow as a society and individually.

Or maybe we’ll just destroy the world.  The odds really favor destruction.  War, nuclear weapons, hate, fear, ignorance, and environmental degradation can easily beat out peace, love, and democracy.  It only takes a few insane or hate-filled or greedy people to plunge the world into death and despair, while it seems like it takes the masses to preserve and save the world.

Perhaps, that’s a dark, pessimistic take on things.  Perhaps it’s merely an accurate reflection of world history.  It’s something I would rather be wrong about.  The world needs its balance of time – a time for work, play, rest, creativity, learning, dreaming, and observing.  We need a life that allows enough time to write and read – and to contribute to society while being self-sufficient.

How will you carry out enough time for what’s needed and desired, for what you would like to do and have to do?


DON”T MISS THESE!!!

How Authors Get Bulk Sales Now

Some key principles to rally your book marketing around

How to write powerful, effective book advertising copy that sells tons of books

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Which Book Publicity Strategy Should You Take?



For authors and publishers to successfully promote their books, they will need an effective PR and book marketing strategy.  There is no one-size-fits-all approach, though there are general guidelines to follow.  Here are some approaches to consider:

1.      Relying on a single approach heavily i.e. social media.
Pros: Social media is powerful, far-reaching, and growing, and costs little to nothing.

Cons: Never limit yourself to a single approach and put all of your eggs in one basket no matter how appealing it is. Cons: Social media can be a big time suck if not done strategically.

2.      Relying only on a hired gun.
Pros:  Hiring an expert publicist or marketer is invaluable, as they know how to execute a solid campaign. leaving you free to write and do what you do best.

Cons: You can’t rely only on whom you hire. You also need to support them by doing what you can do – blogging, tweeting, making appearances, etc.

3.      Making a big push once the book is out.
Pros: Your marketing and publicity is maximized when it hits at the same time of your book’s launch and first three months of its release.

Cons: While promoting heavily just as a book’s publication occurs is important, you really need to begin four  to nine months prior to your book’s launch, to seed the marketplace and deal with people who operate way in advance (i.e. magazine book reviewers work 4-5 months ahead; organizations planning speakers work 6-12 months out).

4.      Copying the campaign strategy of a competitor.
Pros:  If you can find and reach out to the people and groups that helped to successfully launch another book you may get to ride their coattails.

Cons:  There may be many reasons why the other book got so much attention (who wrote it, author’s connections, hired help, etc.) and chasing down the people who pushed one book won’t necessarily mean they respond favorably to yours.

5.      Sending out a lot of press releases.
Pros: Staying active with the media with new pitches and timely angles is a good idea.  You just have to hope they find one idea that they like.

Cons: The media doesn’t want to be spammed. By the third release -- especially if you don’t offer something new and targeted – you’ll turn off the media from even opening your email.  Paid newswire services that send out mass releases don’t get results, though they may help temporarily boost your site’s SEO.

6.      Buy coverage through advertising.
Pros: Some strategic, cost-effective advertising can provide ROI and assist in branding efforts.  It’s especially useful if you have multiple books or expensive products/services to sell as well.

Cons: It doesn’t pay for most authors to do a lot of advertising.  Even if you do advertise, it’s a small piece of the pie.  You still need to promote to the media, make appearances, etc.

You need to come up with a plan that meets your needs, taking into consideration your budget, time availability, skills, contacts, experience, knowledge, and comfort levels. The plan would likely need to take into account a rotation of strategies.  For instance, you may initially spend time seeking out speaking engagements and pre-publication book reviews and then you replace that with a full-court press to get radio and TV exposure.  As the book ages, your approach changes.  You also evaluate success and failure, reassess the market, take into account how people have reacted to your book, and then take a new approach.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
How authors get their book marketing mojo – and avoid failure

Authors cannot succeed without the right attitude

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

Should You Promote Your Book By Yourself?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.


Some Guiding Book Marketing Principles



·         Take a big market and break it up into smaller ones and tackle each one.
·         Always look ahead three to six months so you can plan accordingly.
·         Do what you really enjoy but don’t forget to also do what is needed.
·         Know that you always have options and choices – there is no one way to do anything.
·         Be optimistic in your heart, but cautious in your actions.
·         Prioritize your goals, your day’s activities, your marketing efforts.
·         Don’t labor too long over a decision – use it or lose it.
·         Follow through on your ideas and plans.
·         Realize that you operate on some faulty beliefs or truths, so be prepared to change them.
·         Dream big but always take care of the basics first.
·         Keep an open mind on new marketing approaches.
·         Know your weaknesses -- don’t ignore them; get help.
·         Research things so you have enough information to act appropriately.
·         Sometimes you need to reach beyond your comfort zone and take a chance.
·         You will need more time to do whatever you plan on doing, so start early.
·         Have a Plan B and C and D.
·         At some point you need to change direction.
·         Set a budget of time, resources, and money that you will devote to marketing.
·         Let a professional help you but always contribute to your marketing efforts.
·         Not every day will be a success and not every day will be a failure – strive for consistency amidst the highs and lows.
·         Stay informed – there is a new marketing tool or service being created every day
·         Look to add value to the person you are marketing to.
·         Always work with a sense of urgency, but never panic.
·         Do what matters most first.
·         Always test the waters before diving in.
·         Seek out opinions from those you value and trust – they have a different perspective that could serve you well.
·         Invest in people and relationships.
·         The key to sales is to get other people to sell for you.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
How Authors Get Bulk Sales Now

Some key principles to rally your book marketing around

How to write powerful, effective book advertising copy that sells tons of books

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.