Follow by Email

Monday, October 21, 2019

How To Find A Book Distributor


What You Need To Look For In A Distributor

·         Are they reputable and well-established?
·         Offers fair terms for sales, warehousing, and shipping costs.
·         Has a decent track record for selling similar books in your genre.
·         Will represent one-book authors and not just small publishers of several titles.

When you work with a distributor, follow their timeline of when they plan to launch the sale of your book. They may need several months to get your  book in their system and to allow time for their sales reps to pre-sell it. Many distributors have various fee-based marketing programs, where they will charge you for any number of services, including telemarketing stores, mailing galleys to stores, advertising, or scheduling book signings. They will do other things for free, such as include you in their catalog, create a sales sheet for their sales reps, or list you in various databases and online commerce sites, such as www.amazon.com

If you are published by a traditional publisher, your success will depend, in part, on how big the publisher is and how active they will be in marketing your book. University presses and small publishers have very limited budgets to promote, so don’t assume they will do much for you. Mid-size and larger publishers may do some basic things for you, such as sending out a few dozen advance copies to select reviewers. If you are lucky and your title is seen as one the publisher wants to support they may assign an in-house publicist to work on your book for six to eight weeks -- along with a zillion other titles.

The bigger publishers simply have too many books and too little staff to promote every title. Even when they do get involved, time and budget are key factors. The truth is, most publishers rely on authors to promote and market their books. A publisher provides many advantages – prestige, editing, cover-design, book layout, a sales force, foreign rights sales, etc. – but publicity and marketing is not always part of the deal. You may wonder why they’d publish something that they don’t fully support in their marketing efforts and the answer is: You.

They only agreed to publish you because they thought  the book was good and on a topic that sells. They know that with decent distribution, the book will sell at least a few thousand copies. Depending on their costs, their break-even point may only be that they have to sell a few thousand copies. Second, they know you will promote and market it, that you won’t let your baby die on the shelf. Third, you may have committed to buy a certain number of copies to give out to family, friends, clients, or to resell at seminars and through your site, or because you had a connection to an organization that agreed to buy a bunch of copies.

Further, the publisher can earn extra income by selling various rights to the book – foreign, audio, paperback (if it was published as a hardcover), digital, etc. So if publishers do no worse than break even on a few titles but make at least a few thousand dollars on hundreds of titles published each season, and then have a few mega-selling, breakthrough best-sellers, they will be in the black without doing much by way of marketing and promoting the vast majority of their titles.

Still, traditional publishers can be helpful in giving you ideas or resources for selling your book. They want you to succeed. You can help them by informing them of upcoming events, publicity efforts, and public appearances so they can then inform their sales force and key book buyers.

Some popular book distributors include:

·         Baker & Taylor
·         BCH Fulfillment and Distribution
·         Book Baby
·         Book Masters
·         Cardinal Publishers Group
·         Consortium Books Sales & Distribution
·         Greenleaf Book Group
·         Independent Publishers Group
·         Ingram Content Group
·         Ingram Spark
·         Midpoint Trade Books
·         National Book Network
·         New Leaf Distributing
·         Publishers Group West
·         Readerlink Distribution Services
·         SCB Distributors
·         Simon & Schuster
·         Small Press Distribution

There are also specialty distributors including:

·         AK Press
·         Anchor Distributors
·         American West Books
·         Bella Distribution
·         Casemate
·         DeVorss & Company
·         New Shelves Books
·         Sunbelt Publications

·         Tan Books


“Nobody ever died of laughter.”
--Max Berbohm

“We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.”
--Benjamin Franklin

“People who read only the classics are sure to remain up-to-date.”
--Gilbert J. Presterson

 “Behind every great fortune there is a crime.”
--Honore de Balzac

“Few maxims are true in every respect.”

-- Luc de Clapiers, Marquis de Vauvenargues


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
How authors get their book marketing mojo – and avoid failure

Authors cannot succeed without the right attitude

So what is needed to be a champion book marketer?

Should You Promote Your Book By Yourself?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How authors can sell more books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Oh, So This Is How You Promote A Book?!


Image result for pr images

Authors may struggle to write a book and get it edited properly.  They may also struggle with locating a publisher or deciding how to self-publish.  But their biggest confusion – and challenge – comes when it’s time to market their book.  So just what are authors supposed to do when it comes to promoting or marketing a book?

The list of core basics include:

·         Creating a website.
·         Crafting press kit materials (book trailer is optional).
·         Devising a budget of money and time for marketing – along with a timeline and an identification of resources, connections, and assets.
·         Posting on social media regularly, such as Linked In, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest.  You Tube, Instagram.
·         Having a blog and/or podcast, newsletter, or video channel.
·         Speaking (even for free at bookstores, libraries, churches, groups, business)
·         Advertising.
·         Sending your advance review copies three-and-a-half months prior to pub date to book reviewers at magazines, newspapers, trade publications, and online.
·         Joining certain communities such as GoodReads.
·         Designing business cards, stationery and even premiums like mugs, t-shirts, and pens to brand your book and name.

But book marketing has no end to it.  You can do 50 things to promote and market your book.  Here are some other items for your consideration:

·         Attend local conferences – you can network there and find people who may utilize you as a speaker, buy your book, or give you tools and ideas to promote yourself.

·         Make signs – little posters – and see if others will let you post them.  They could be put on bulletin boards at public locations.  You can put a poster on the side of your house or on your car.

·         Include your book for giveaways or resale at charitable events.

·         Join professional or regional organizations so that you can connect with members to promote your book.

·         Help out at a charitable event or something at a school, temple, or local gathering – and tell people about your book.

·         Ask friends and family members to each personally introduce you, via email, to 100 connections per person.

·         Give something away, online, so that when people come to your site, they will give you their contact into or buy your book in exchange for this free downloadable digital gift.

Host an event and ask invitees to each bring friends. Make it a book launch party. People may also run a lottery, send out a survey, or hold a contest.  These things can take more time and offer less payoff than you realize. Some marketing ideas are best left unexecuted.  But, no doubt, you’ll come up with innovative ways to get the word out about, well, your words.  

No matter what you do, do something. Every day.  If you keep at it – and do it wisely – you will see good things happen. You may have to wait months or even years for the true benefit of today’s efforts to come to fruition, but hang in there.

DON”T MISS THESE!!!
Authors, Avoid These 21 Worst Practices For Seeking Media Coverage

How Do Authors Get The Media’s Attention?

Authors, How Do You Brand Yourself?

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

Book Marketing Buzz Blog Celebrates Post #3,000

How Authors Can Sell More Books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

How Authors Get Bulk Sales Now

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

How To Stop Abusing The English Language


Image result for English images

It’s been unfortunately, a well-documented sport to point out how society’s mastery of the English language is weakening and on course for total destruction.  But if you’re trying to find your way through uncapitalized email exchanges, incorrectly spelled words, or just plain abuses in how we communicate, look no further than a handy book by Benjamin Dreyer, Dreyer’s English:  An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style.

Dreyer, in case you’re wondering who he is, serves as the copy chief for Random House.

So how does he figure out how our language should be written?  He says it needs to literally sound better.

“One of the best ways to determine whether your prose is well-constructed is to read it aloud,” he writes. “A sentence that can’t be readily voiced is a sentence that likely needs to be rewritten.

“A good sentence, I find myself saying frequently, is one that the reader can follow from beginning to end, no matter how long it is, without having to double back in confusion because the writer misused or omitted a key piece of punctuation, chose a vague or misleading pronoun, or in some other way engaged in inadvertent misdirection.”

He has some very useful sections, each identifying rules that need to be followed, though sometimes approving of some rule violations. 

Here are his “big three” rules:

·         Never begin a sentence with “and” or “but.”
·         Never split an infinitive.
·         Never end a sentence with a preposition.

His other seven pet peeves:

·         No contractions in formal writing.
·         Avoid the passive voice.
·         Sentence fragments are bad.
·         A person must be a “who.”
·         “None” is singular.
·         “Whether” must never be accompanied by “or not.”
·         Never introduce a list with “like.”

He writes extensively of 67 things to do or avoid when it comes to punctuation, noting:

“If words are the flesh, muscle, and bone of prose, punctuation is the breath.  In support of the words you’ve carefully selected, punctuation is your best means of conveying to the reader how you mean your writing to be read, how you mean for it to sound. A comma, sounds different than a semi-colon; parenthesis make a different noise than dashes.”

His section on misspelled words includes ones we often screw up, including:

·         Dumbbell
·         Fascist
·         Minuscule
·         Inoculate
·         Pharaoh
·         Pejorative
·         Sacrilegious
·         Restaurateur
·         Surpersede
·         Taillight
·         Unwieldy
·         Y’all

His chapter on misused or misunderstood words was excellent.  People need to know the difference between disinterested and uninterested, as well as fewer than and less than.  Some are nonplussed by that word, while others don’t properly use the word penultimate.  There’s always confusion with affect/effect, a lot and allot, any more and anymore, conscience and conscious, eminent and imminent, and so on. Even now you’re wondering if you know the difference between flack and flak, farther and further, or hanged and hung.

In addition to covering proper things such as capitalization, how stupider is actually a word, and why clich├ęs should be avoided like the plague. Dreyer does a nice job of showing us how to trim unneeded words.  We can certainly follow this advice:

·         close proximity (close is not needed)
·         ATM machine (machine is not needed)
·         advance planning (ditch advance)
·         end result (end is not needed)
·         fall down (get rid of down)
·         lift up (eliminate up)
·         future plans (future can be dismissed)
·         overexaggerate (over is unnecessary)
·         undergraduate student (student is not needed)

Some of the resources Dreyer follows and recommends include these:

Any book on language, especially one that tries to teach us how to speak properly, can be dry or feel like a lecture but this book was punchy and personable.  We all make silly mistakes.  A good reading of this book – and repeated references to it – could serve each of us well.

“If you’re not failing, you’re not trying hard enough.”
--Gretchen Rubin

“The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.”
--Michelangelo

“I’d rather regret the things I have done than the things that I haven’t.”
--Lucille Ball

“I hate reality but it’s still the best place to get a good steak.”

--Woody Allen

DON”T MISS THESE!!!
Book Marketing Buzz Blog Celebrates Post #3,000

The Book Marketing Strategies Of Best-Sellers

How Authors Can Sell More Books

No. 1 Book Publicity Resource: 2019 Toolkit For Authors -- FREE

How Authors Get Bulk Sales Now

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.