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Sunday, January 19, 2020

Interview With Founder of Award-Winning Upstart, Running Wild Press



   Upstart Indie Press Gaining Recognition As A Breakout Publisher With Award-Winning Books




Running Wild Press, a small indie publisher with nearly two dozen titles in its four year publishing history, has produced two books selected by Kirkus Reviews as Indie Books of the Year for 2019.

“We publish stories that cross genres with great stories and writing that don’t fit neatly in a box,” says Founder and Executive Editor Lisa Diane Kastner, who is also an author.

One of the two book-of-the-year selections is Frontal Matter: Glue Gone Wild by Suzanne Samples, a moving memoir about the author’s struggle to live with terminal brain cancer at age 36. The other is Dark Corners by Reuben “Tihi” Hayslett, a series of explosive essays and narratives written with unsettling illumination that touch upon racism, LGBTQ, and the human condition in a Trumpian world.

“The book marketplace is growing and expanding, because publishers like Running Wild Press are wisely filling a void. We target stories that the public craves by lesser pursued authors. Those stories that aren’t perceived to be safe to publish,” says Kastner. Her press is promoted to the media by the PR firm that I work for, and in getting to know them, I can say they publish some terrific books that would otherwise go unpublished.

The book industry publishes over 4,000 titles every single day yet some stories don’t see the light of day and that’s Running Wild Press’s focus.

Some recent local and national accomplishments of Running Wild Press include these:
        Short stories have been nominated for the Horror Writers Association Brahm Stoker Award.
        They have had several stories nominated for Pushcart Prizes, PEN Awards, and the National Book Award.
        Their books have been included in gift bags for presenters and nominees for the SAG Awards and the Grammy Awards and were included in gift bags for VIPS who attended the George Lopez Celebrity Golf Tournament.
        They sponsored a mini-literature festival at Gatsby Books in Long Beach in partnership with the Long Beach Literary Arts Center.
“We started the press because we read too many great stories that never found a readership,” adds Kastner. “We wanted to create a platform.  We look for unusual tales that mainstream publishing won’t pick up because the story is not neatly defined.”

For more information about Running wild Press, please see:  www.runningwildpress.com.

Below is an interview with Running wild Press Founder Lisa Kastner.

  1. Lisa, what inspired you to launch an indie book publishing company, Running Wild Press?
When I ran a writers community and a non-profit writers organization, I encountered tons of brilliant writers who weren’t published. I’d ask why and many times the answer was that they received beautiful rejections that simply said that the story didn’t quite fit the publication.  Or they tried to get agents and the agent politely said that she didn’t think the piece fit with her list and wished the author well. These were truly great stories which couldn’t make it to readers. So I decided to create a publishing house that focused on great stories with great writing that didn’t fit neatly in a box. That became Running Wild Press.

  1. What challenges have you been confronting? Honestly, our biggest challenge has been getting the attention of most mainstream publishing, reviewers, and marketing circles. We’ve been blessed to receive amazing reviews from Kirkus but we’ve submitted our books for review to other mainstream reviewers to no avail.  This is a shame because I’m positive that if they’d simply read the stories, they’d love them.

  1. Does the book publishing universe have room, in the marketplace for yet another publisher, given some 4,000 titles are cranked out every day in America? Absolutely. There’s room for everyone. We should all be working together to help each other so that we can get our stories to readers.  No one reads only a single story. Readers are readers and many read across genres and forms, so let’s give them lots of options.

  1. You are a writer and editor as well. How does it feel to put on the publisher thinking cap to determine which books should be published? At first it felt like I didn’t have the right to do that: a kind of Imposter Syndrome. Then one day I was looking at a lovely memory book I was given when I graduated from Fairfield University with an MFA and most of the comments were about what an amazing editor I was and how I had an eye for talent. Seeing those comments from professors and fellow students gave me the courage to get over my Imposter Syndrome and give it a shot. Of course, with every title we put into publication, I get that feeling again, but when we get amazing feedback from reviewers and readers then I know we made the right choice.

5.      Are you shocked at having two books selected by Kirkus Reviews for Indie Book of the Year in 2019? Absolutely! I was shocked when half of the titles we submitted for reviews received starred reviews. Imagine my thrill when we also had two books named to the best of 2019. I was completely overjoyed. The authors, Suzanne Samples and Reuben “Tihi” Hayslett, as well as their editors more than deserved the destinctions. The works speak for themselves.

6.      What trends are you seeing in book publishing today? There’s a greater emphasis on independent publishing. More authors are taking the plunge to either start presses and publish others or to focus on their own work and self publishing. There’s also more hybrid authors -  authors who both self publish and publish with bigger houses. Once upon a time, that was considered a no-no. Now it’s pretty common. Also, once upon a time, if someone published in one genre then they were stuck in that genre. For example, if you were published in horror then publishing houses and publications only reached out to you for horror stories. Now, authors are published across genres quite frequently.

  1. Define what you like to green-light for Running Wild Press. I’m the first to review all submissions. Nothing goes forward without my approval. When I’m looking at submissions I’m looking for a strong story set up in the initial five pages, I’m looking for a strong voice. I want to see something in the narrative or way that the story’s being told that’s a bit unusual or unique. And I’m looking for a perspective that we haven’t necessarily seen before. I’m also looking for cross genre - so stories that don’t fit neatly in a box.  For example, Suzanne Samples FRONTAL MATTER: GLUE GONE WILD is a memoir about her experience with fighting brain cancer but it’s told in a flash fiction style of writing that’s more stream of conciousness. It has a very funny and positive outlook, which was refreshing. For DARK CORNERS by Reuben “Tihi” Hayslett, Tihi’s collection shares stories with unique points of view and in-your-face narratives.

  1. Why do you believe most publishers ignore publishing the type of books – narrative poems, short stories, novellas, niche non-fiction – that you run towards with open arms? I honestly think that mainstream publishers shy away from those forms because they don’t think that they can make money off of them. The reality is that a narrative poem is simply a great story told in a poetry format. Short stories and novellas are the easiset forms of writing to be translated to film or television because of the story arcs, structures, and narrative threads. Those are missed opportunities.

  1. You say too many books come from whites and males. Why do you think the books published don’t reflect the diversity of Americans? Before we started the publishing house, I would have said that it’s purely an unconscious bias. I do believe that there is an unconcious bias but it’s not the only reason. I think part of it is that sometimes writers simply don’t know where to send their works so they’re sending them to the wrong publications or publications that are already gluttoned with submissions and tend to stick with authors they’ve already published.

I also think that, for whatever reason, white males are more persistent. For example, we recently had a call for novellas and at one point only a third of the submissions were authored by females. So, I posted on social media and asked for more females to submit their novellas. Guess what happened? I received a slew of new submissions - from males who wrote from a female protagonist’s perspective. Seriously? Somehow the men perceived that as a call for them to send their best female imitation?  Women especially need to get better at simply going for it, otherwise we’ll never get to equilibrium.

10.  You say you are a small press that brings great stories from new voices out into the world. How do these specialty stories push boundaries of genre and perspective? One comment I received about FRONTAL MATTER: GLUE GONE WILD by Suzanne Samples from a reviewer was that they’d never seen a memoir about cancer that was so funny and optimistic. Each book that we publish gives the reader something new, something unique to experience.  This year we’re publishing TURING’S GRAVEYARD: STORIES by Terence Hawkins. It’s already gotten a starred review and it comes out in May. Terry brings these funny, snarky, dark and complex characters and stories to life. He takes genres and puts them in a blender then pours them out to see what happens. It’s a blast. Another example of someone willing to let the stories run wild (See what I did there).

DON”T MISS THESE!!!
New Year's Resolutions For Every Author

Free 2020 Book Marketing Toolkit for Authors

17 Book PR Strategies That Work

The Author Publicity Priority List

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2020. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.


Thursday, January 16, 2020

These Book Marketing Lessons Are All Around You

                                  Image result for lessons learned images


Book marketing lessons can be found in everyone and anything.  Here are a few of them:


  • You can get 50% of the people to buy into anything. Just say it with confidence and repeat it over and over.  All you need to do is see Donald Trump.
  • One gets attention from being loud.  Just ask anyone who uses mass transit. I look up every time some loud moron talks excessively, an idiot’s obnoxious ring tone goes off, or someone feels the need to publicly play volume-challenging music.
  • Act crazy -- that definitely gets you attention.  Just sound nuts or act in a menacing manner.  Not enough to do actual harm or get arrested, but enough for people to stare at you.
  • Attach a pretty face or hot body image to your message.    Even in the enlightened #metoo women’s movement of 2020, sex and beauty still sell products, services, and ideas.  Take a hard look at Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and social media.  How many uglies get Instagram followers in the millions?  How many commercials, newscasts, or films feature attractive people?  Exactly.
  • Always offer a prize, swag, book give away, or something free.  People can’t get enough of this – even if they don’t really need it.
  • Pay attention to language.  Oh, you thought I meant use smart words and keep it clean?  No, no, no.  Dumb it down, curse, and go "street" on people.  I don’t know if that’s even a term, but to go street is what it sounds like.  Get into the gutter, keep it real, and throw in a few F-bombs to catch up to the trend of the day.
  • Make a desire sound like a need. You don’t need to go on a cruise to Alaska but you desire it.  So, advertise it as a need.  You need a break, you need to see this place, you need to experience luxury and comfort. Sell your book the same way.
  • Build on familiar references.  Makes sure people understand your marketing metaphors and PR analogies.  If I say this book makes Honest Abe look like Nixon, most should know the reference to two presidents. But if I reference a rapper or some reality TV show B-lister, only a dedicated few will recognize him.
  • Be controversial.  Those who make accusations or demands get attention.  Find an enemy or a bad guy. Demonize something or someone and speak up on behalf of others. If your book is about weight loss, criticize other diets or villainize food companies. If your book’s on policy, criticize elected officials or government agencies.  If it’s a novel about cheating spouses, rail against cheaters.  Find a target and shoot at it.
  • Take ownership of an idea, value, or issue, regardless of your personal views.  If your book can be linked, topic wise, to something in the news, hijack it and make it your story.  From bullying, the environment, to healthcare, someone’s talking about whatever your book covers so you should be front and center on it.
  • Be a personality and less about substance. This one hurts to say, because most writers want to stand for something, using their words to tell a story with passion and purpose. But regardless of truth or values, focus on selling the sizzle. The shiny toy gets attention.  Be a persona, one that’s funny, smart, strong or whatever gets people’s attention and wins them over.

Lastly, promote your book by getting others to do your work. Get testimonials, consumer reviews, and praise from those with credentials, name recognition, or big social media followings. Ask them to post about you and your book. Third-party validation still legitimizes you and makes people feel good about trusting in your book.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
New Year's Resolutions For Every Author

Free 2020 Book Marketing Toolkit for Authors

17 Book PR Strategies That Work

The Author Publicity Priority List

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2020. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Book On College Scholarships Tells Us How To Save Money!




   New Book Reveals How To Uncover Tons of Scholarships and Strategically Increase Winnability


                       Scholarship Strategies: Finding and Winning the Money You Need by [O’Toole, Jean]

Over the past 15 years, college scholarship strategist Jean O’Toole, has spoken before thousands of students, inspiring them to pursue their academic dreams. Now she has a new book out that helps them afford those dreams, Scholarship Strategies: Finding and Winning the Money You Need (Morgan James Publishing, Trade Paper, 128 pages, $17.95, ISBN: 987-1-64279-482-3).  For more information, you should check out: www.Connections101.com

Below is an interview with Jean:

  1. What myths do too many students and parents operate under when it comes to scholarships? The most common myth is that people think that scholarships are just for the top athletes, high academic achievers or students with the greatest financial need. There are scholarships for those students but there are also scholarships for students that have nothing to do with grades, sports or financial need. In fact there is a growing category of scholarships that are identified as need-blind. There are scholarships for students of all ages and all stages of life, not just for graduating high school seniors. There are scholarships for younger children, scholarships for students who are currently in college as well as scholarships for adults seeking to go back to school. Scholarships are also available for non-citizens. All students can and should pursue scholarships.

  1. How does one figure out which types of scholarships to seek out? Students miss out on scholarships because they focus only on opportunities that relate to their grade point average, extracurricular activities, community service and career goal. I suggest, as a first step in the scholarship search, for students to create what I call a Personal Search Engine List. This is a list that describes all activities, interests and accomplishments from their life along with what they want to accomplish in their future. It will also include their “ready-to-go materials”, which are papers, projects, essays or poems which were completed for class or club assignments to be used for potential scholarships. The Personal Search Engine List becomes a student’s map for monies. It guides a student on opportunities they can and should seek out.

  1. Where should they look to discover these scholarships? There are four places to find scholarships: a student’s school, their family members, scholarship book directories and online search engines. First, high school students should proactively be regularly asking ask their school counselors for any available opportunities.  I call this “Getting Out of the Waiting Game”. College students should be proactively asking their financial aid offices, department offices for their field of study and their alumni offices on campus. Secondly, all students should ask family members to find out if there are scholarships through their companies or professional unions. Third, students should utilize the index of scholarship book directories to identify scholarships quickly that correlate to their Personal Search Engine List.  Lastly, there are many online scholarship search engine websites. My favorite is www.scholarships.com.

  1. Don’t school guidance counselors know about all of these scholarships? High school guidance counselors are incredible people and do all they can to serve their students. They have  priorities that take precedent over extensive scholarship research. Their focus is to be sure students are on track to graduate from high school, have applied to colleges and have completed their FAFSA form by their needed deadlines. Scholarships from companies, organizations, individuals and foundations are sent to schools and counselors will distribute that information to their students. Unfortunately with their other responsibilities, there simply is not additional time for counselors to do deep dive extensive research into additional scholarship opportunities. Middle school and elementary school counselors also have other responsibilities that take priority to research and distribution of scholarships that could be applicable to their students.

  1. What gives someone the edge to win a scholarship?  Although there is never a guarantee of winning a scholarship, students can give themselves an edge in winning scholarships. There are 3 types of scholarships which have a higher statistical chance of being won. First, any local scholarship that is given out only to students in specific towns or counties have a higher chance of being won because the applicant pool is lower. Similarly, scholarships which require extensive essays or projects will have fewer applicants. Most students skip those scholarships simply because of other time constraints from homework assignments, jobs or family responsibilities.  It dramatically gives any student who chooses to expedite those applications an edge and advantage. Lastly, family member scholarships have a high chance of winning as the applicant pool will be limited.

  1. You offer dozens of strategies for winning the money needed for college. Tell us three of them. One strategy is to search for scholarships that can make use of past papers, projects, essays and poems that a student has completed for past homework assignments. The time has already been spent. New material does not need to be created. Another strategy is to contact scholarship committees to connect with them and inquire what they are looking for in an ideal candidate. Students can then better craft their application materials. Finally the greatest strategy is to gather criteria information about scholarships that pertain to students a year or two older than themselves. Knowing criteria in advance, a student can make informed choices on how they use their time outside of the classroom to qualify for the most opportunities in the near future.

  1. Tell us some success stories of those you’ve helped win the scholarship sweepstakes! Thousands of students have been inspired to start scholarship money missions with my empowering approach to scholarships.  It is an honor to have played a role in their success. I am  proud to have helped Saif from Brooklyn, NY win scholarships totaling over $190,000.  He was a student who was academically good but not an “A” student. I am also proud to have motivated Amani from New York City, who won enough scholarship money to pay for her education at Columbia University.  Lastly, it was extremely exciting to receive an email from the Dean of Academics at a private Catholic high school in New Jersey notifying me that his 41 graduating seniors had collectively won 5.6 million dollars in scholarships thanks to my help.

  1. You listed 15 ways to reduce college costs in your book.  Please share a few with us. There are so many ways to cut college costs. The sooner students can complete their degree,  the better it will be for their bottom line. Students should aim to start day 1 of college with as many college credits completed as possible. There are a few ways to do this. Students who test high enough on AP exams can receive college credits for those scores. Students can also take college classes at reduced tuition rates either online or on campuses prior to graduating high school to obtain college credits. I have seen students who proactively attained college credits in advance of starting their undergraduate degrees start officially as second year students. Completing degrees in less than 4 years can save a family thousands of dollars.

Jean is represented by the public relations firm that I work for. She is a terrific resource for students and parents -- and I highly recommend you explore what she has to say.


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
New Year's Resolutions For Every Author

Free 2020 Book Marketing Toolkit for Authors

17 Book PR Strategies That Work

The Author Publicity Priority List


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2020. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Can You Harness Your Fear To Market Your Book?



Image result for fear images" 

Fear.

It can drive us to take action, but it can also cripple us.

It can force us to confront our reality, but it can send us into hiding.

We fear the unknown.  We fear what could go wrong. We obsess over what we fear instead of seeking to take ownership of what we can control.

We let our minds wander into the negative, rather than take that same energy and passion and allow ourselves to dream and turn ideas into a positive reality.

How do you handle fear?  Is it an asset to you – or a burden?  Does it move you to go after what you want or does it become an excuse for not trying, for not reaching for the stars?

You can write your book today. You can market and promote it. You can get others to buy and read it. Or you can languish in fear and not take even a baby step towards any of these things.

It stinks to live in fear. And we do it to ourselves. It’s not all in our heads. Feat gets into our bodies. It permeates our actions. It’s in our words. It stalks our dreams.  There is no escape from fear unless you simply choose to dismiss it and not allow it any currency in your life.

I understand fear well. It leads to doubt, procrastination, bad choices, limited results and a nagging feeling that you are not reaching your destiny or living a fulfilled life. You look around and know that others are not better than you, but you marvel at how they got lucky or found someone to help them live their dream.

But you can break the fear cycle.  

How, you ask? Why should today be any different than yesterday, you wonder?

Here’s the thing.  Fear is only as real as we let it be.  Sure, there are times, situations, or circumstances where concern or even fear is necessary.  Danger, loss or pain exists all around us.  But that moment of concern should only last briefly, long enough to make a sensible plan to overcome obstacles or handle anticipated pitfalls. You need to take reasonable risks in order to grow. 

Even if you fail miserably, get up and try again. Don’t let yourself be held hostage by things that can be navigated, avoided, or dealt with.

This doesn’t mean you’ll go through life pain-free or without loss. On the contrary, you will have more pain and more loss as you try new things, do more things, and reach beyond your comfort level. 
But the pay-off can be worth it.

So how can your harness your fear to work for you – and not against you?

·         Take action, rather than overthinking or being obsessive over possible failure. You already fail what you don’t try.
·         Seek guidance from others – family, friends, therapists, or book industry professionals.
·         Come up with a list of ideas on how you can succeed – and dismiss listing how you can fail.
·         Get some success under your belt to build up your confidence – tackle smaller, easier tasks first.
·         Envision success – how it will feel and how it can happen. Meditate for just a few minutes where you can visualize a clear path to reaching your goals.
·         Rather than live in fear of the unknown, start to seek out answers and get a better understanding of where the real challenges live and avoid the danger zones.
·         Enjoy a few good motivational books and self-help seminars.  They will move you to reach for the stars. We all need a little push and a lot of inspiration.
·         Be willing to do something that you resisted, dismissed, or didn’t know about.  Perhaps it will work out and thus, you’ll see that you need to change your perspective of things.

Fear has little upside in the long run. But moving beyond your fear to accomplish wonderful things has a potentially huge benefit. 

Go for it!


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
New Year's Resolutions For Every Author

Free 2020 Book Marketing Toolkit for Authors

17 Book PR Strategies That Work

The Author Publicity Priority List


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2020. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

You Need To Spotify Your Book Marketing

Image result for spotify images

With the New Year upon us – a new decade at that – I thought I would finally get with the times and be a Spotify customer. It’s amazing how it takes me years to give into something new.  But I realize the same may be true for you and your approach to book marketing and author branding.

For me, my change from listening to the radio came at the insistence of my son, just before he turned 15.

He’s this generation’s poster child for not only using tech but embracing it.  He doesn’t know from CD’s.  He knows iTunes, You Tube, and digital music.  He doesn’t even know of local radio before Sirius XM Satellite.  I remember big-sized records and 8-track tapes.  I remember cassette tapes and CD’s.  I recall the radio. But it’s been years since I bought any music or listened to anything with any regularity. Now I stepped it up.

I went on a download spree to build up my play lists. U2, Madonna, Pet Shop Boys, REM, Expose, Michael Jackson, Prince, and today’s top hits were some of the first selections.  God, I missed listening to music like this, easily hearing dozens of songs that I love and feel inspired and moved by.

The very first piece of music that I took ownership of was as a teen.  I bought Rush 2012 and The Police.  I loved the Walkman era and would walk for miles while listening to 80’s songs, particularly UK boy bands.

But I’m not lost in another decade.  I continue to appreciate today’s stars as well.  I am not a snob, believing that only old music is great. Today’s tunes resemble this generation’s needs and desires and grew out of the stuff I listened to.

Spotify is easy.  $15 a month covers my whole family, who can listen on any device – phone, laptop, desktop, whatever. Unlimited access to a zillion songs. I love it!

Ok, so back to book marketing.  Just as this was hesitant to move on to Spotify from a familiar but outdated, less-efficient, more costly ways of listening to music, you likely are resistant to some of today’s way of doing things to plug your brand, sell a book, and promote your ideas.  Well…get over it.

Blog.

Podcast.

Tweet.

You can do it. You can type and/or talk, right?  Ok, not so hard.  Ask anyone under 20 to help you if you need a push. You can do it – and you will love it once you do.

Curiosity and angst will melt away and you will feel like a burden was lifted, a wall torn down, a bully silenced. In 2020, say good riddance to the methods of thought and action that have retarded your growth and stopped you from realizing your full potential.

Not everything you know is useless.  The past is not all bad.  No, no.  But you just need to reboot and take the good and make it better – and lose or diminish the bad.

My father-in-law recently saw my teen-age son scan a check that he received for Hanukah, into his iPhone and get deposited onto his debit card account. His reaction was: “I hope I’m dead before I have to do that.”

He’s 74 or so but he has woefully not adapted to 2020.  No smart phone. No computer. No Spotify, social media, or digital banking for him.

But once we let our mental holdbacks get sidelined and we give way to the latest, greatest tools out there, we win. We feel like we are no longer on the other side of a world gone by.  We feel emancipated.

You can flourish this year if you allow yourself to delve into the things you’ve been avoiding.  Create or update that website.  Get onto social media or greatly expand your footprint.  Consider writing a blog or taking an existing one and posting more often. Get a You Tube channel.  Create a podcast.

2020 is a new year.  God it’s 20 years since the new millennium.  It’s finally a decade we can easily refer to – the 20’s vs. the aughts or teens – or was it the 10’s.  See what I mean?  It’s your year!  Why not?

2020 is here:

The Olympics.

The elections.

New sports championships.

New award-winning movies, music, theater, TV shows.

And a new you, ready to attack technology or whatever the hell stands in your way. 

Obliterate all obstacles.  Take a chance. Make a change. You will love it.

Shhh. Billie Jean by Michael Jackson is playing. 


DON”T MISS THESE!!!
New Year's Resolutions For Every Author

Free 2020 Book Marketing Toolkit for Authors

17 Book PR Strategies That Work

The Author Publicity Priority List


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2020. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.