Saturday, June 22, 2024

Authors Should Market To These 11 Cities

 


Every book has a targeted readership, based on its genre, plot themes, setting, and who the writer is. But one thing is clear, there are 11 cities that ooze with more wealth and disposable income than any other part of the country. Authors should follow the money as they market their books.

According to a recent USA Today story that cites the findings of a wealth management firm, our nation has nearly 5.5 million millionaires — around one in every 67 Americans. Of them, 10,000 each have over a hundred million bucks. They are called centi-millionaires. And of them, there are 788 billionaires in the US, which reflects about 28 percent of the globe’s total number of billionaires. The US has over 67 trillion dollars in wealth, exceeding any other nation.

The cities with the most millionaires, each with at least 25,000 such people, are as follows:

1. New York City
2. Bay Area
3. LA
4. Chicago
5. Houston
6. Dallas
7. Seattle
8. Boston
9. Miami
10. Austin
11. DC

I would recommend that all authors peddling their books should absolutely have a plan or a strategy to sell their books in each and every one of those cities. They tend to be literate, book-buying locations, and just about all of them but Dallas are liberal places. They value the cultural arts. 
 

In each city, approach bookstores and libraries for book signings and appearances. Seek out potential readers online from these cities. Explore how you can connect to these places as best you can, for your book buying reader is there.


Need PR Help?

Brian Feinblum, the founder of this award-winning blog, with over 3.9 million page views, can be reached at brianfeinblum@gmail.com  He is available to help authors promote their story, sell their book, and grow their brand. He has over 30 years of experience in successfully helping thousands of authors in all genres. Let him be your advocate, teacher, and motivator!

 

About Brian Feinblum

Brian Feinblum should be followed on www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2024. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester with his wife, two kids, and Ferris, a black lab rescue dog, and El Chapo, a pug rescue dog. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s The Independent.  This award-winning blog has generated over 3.9 million pageviews. With 4,900+ posts over the past dozen years, it was named one of the best book marketing blogs by BookBaby  http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  and recognized by Feedspot in 2021 and 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. It was also named by www.WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” For the past three decades, including 21 years as the head of marketing for the nation’s largest book publicity firm, and director of publicity positions at two independent presses, Brian has worked with many first-time, self-published, authors of all genres, right along with best-selling authors and celebrities such as: Dr. Ruth, Mark Victor Hansen, Joseph Finder, Katherine Spurway, Neil Rackham, Harvey Mackay, Ken Blanchard, Stephen Covey, Warren Adler, Cindy Adams, Todd Duncan, Susan RoAne, John C. Maxwell, Jeff Foxworthy, Seth Godin, and Henry Winkler. He hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America several years ago, and has spoken at ASJA, Independent Book Publishers Association Sarah Lawrence College, Nonfiction Writers Association, Cape Cod Writers Association, Willamette (Portland) Writers Association, APEX, Morgan James Publishing, and Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association. His letters-to-the-editor have been published in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, New York Post, NY Daily News, Newsday, The Journal News (Westchester) and The Washington Post. His first published book was The Florida Homeowner, Condo, & Co-Op Association Handbook.  It was featured in The Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald.

 

Friday, June 21, 2024

Discovering How Little We Know


Country music star George Strait broke the record for the most-attended ticketed concert in the United States this past weekend. He played for a crowd of 110,905 fans at Kyle Field in College Station, Texas, breaking the previous record by several thousand people that was set by the Grateful Dead nearly 50 years ago. 

Up until the other day, I never heard of him.  

Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Tim McGraw, Garth Brooks. Yes. George who? Nope. 

Hailed as the king of country, Strait has had 44 number one hits, and amassed 86 Top 10 hits on Billboard's Hot Country Songs chart.  

Something does not add up here. The guy apparently has been a bonafide star for over 40 years, selling 120 million albums, but because he travels in circles that I don’t orbit — and because mainstream media has not given him his due — I was void of knowing anything about him.  

It is eye-opening to me how ignorant of him that I have been, and yet it is not surprising. So many people in America lack the same core knowledge about anything. We are already a nation divided by politics and the silo news outlets that cover it, but look at everything, from movies and books to plays and sports and really any industry, hobby, or movement. Our nation is fractured in its awareness, involvement, or fandom of most things, people, events, or issues. 

Just like Generation Z may not know of Ted Williams and the Silent Generation can’t name two rappers, across the board of demographics we are not exposed to the same things. Our culture has a lot of diversity — religion, gender, age, race, etc. — but it seems there is less of a mix or interaction than we would think would exist, especially with an Internet that makes boundaries meaningless.  

I suspect our boundaries are still up. People tend to associate with those who hold their views, common histories, and passions. We are divided amongst so many lines and thus, what we know of the world is still surprisingly quite limited. 

I say this as one who grew up in Brooklyn, where on every block was a different type of people, but even in that melting pot where people are exposed to other things but the level of engagement may not be as deep as we would like to think.  

As one who reads a lot of books and newspapers and interacts with a global culture in NYC, I still knew squat about Strait. I also don’t know much of anything about a lot of other people, things, cultures, and events. Perhaps there is just so much going on that the task is impossible.  

It’s funny, you think at times that when you reach a certain age that you kind of know it all. You understand children because you were one. You understand parenting because you have children. You watch your parents age and pass away, and as you get older, you see patterns to life. But by no means do I know much of everything. 

I don’t think I speak just for myself. The vast majority of our country is in the dark about so much, including people who pride themselves as being intellects or culturally aware people.  

We waste so much time repeating things that don’t serve us so well, surfing the same sites or watching subpar television or trashing someone on social media or watching mindless sports or witnessing political debates that go nowhere.  

You can see why it is so hard for an author to get discovered or for their book to break through. Everyone is preoccupied with their small worlds, leaving little room to absorb something new and different.  

Over the last few generations, the same argument about cultural literacy and a lack of common core knowledge have been taking place. There is no easy answer other than to implore each of us to change our habits. Expose yourself truly to new things — from foods, ideas, histories, books, music, art, culture — to best understand the meaning of life and to taste its best offerings. 

I am going to download a Strait song or two now. I may not likely become a fan but I should give it an honest try. Will you try something new today?

BookCAMP Is Coming – Get Half Off!

 

I am speaking at BookCAMP June 23rd!


BOOKCamp 2024 is June 23-25, 2024 in New Jersey. 

The business of publishing, marketing, & craft: 

Register at https://www.independentpressaward.com/ipabookcamp

 

Here is a discount link for a three-day pass to BookCAMP

https://www.paypal.com/ncp/payment/WDLJNRK87864Y that you can share/post. 

*$251 off a three day pass $299 (instead of $550)

 

Need PR Help?

Brian Feinblum, the founder of this award-winning blog, with over 3.9 million page views, can be reached at brianfeinblum@gmail.com  He is available to help authors promote their story, sell their book, and grow their brand. He has over 30 years of experience in successfully helping thousands of authors in all genres. Let him be your advocate, teacher, and motivator!

 

About Brian Feinblum

Brian Feinblum should be followed on www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2024. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester with his wife, two kids, and Ferris, a black lab rescue dog, and El Chapo, a pug rescue dog. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s The Independent.  This award-winning blog has generated over 3.9 million pageviews. With 4,900+ posts over the past dozen years, it was named one of the best book marketing blogs by BookBaby  http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  and recognized by Feedspot in 2021 and 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. It was also named by www.WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” For the past three decades, including 21 years as the head of marketing for the nation’s largest book publicity firm, and director of publicity positions at two independent presses, Brian has worked with many first-time, self-published, authors of all genres, right along with best-selling authors and celebrities such as: Dr. Ruth, Mark Victor Hansen, Joseph Finder, Katherine Spurway, Neil Rackham, Harvey Mackay, Ken Blanchard, Stephen Covey, Warren Adler, Cindy Adams, Todd Duncan, Susan RoAne, John C. Maxwell, Jeff Foxworthy, Seth Godin, and Henry Winkler. He hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America several years ago, and has spoken at ASJA, Independent Book Publishers Association Sarah Lawrence College, Nonfiction Writers Association, Cape Cod Writers Association, Willamette (Portland) Writers Association, APEX, Morgan James Publishing, and Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association. His letters-to-the-editor have been published in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, New York Post, NY Daily News, Newsday, The Journal News (Westchester) and The Washington Post. His first published book was The Florida Homeowner, Condo, & Co-Op Association Handbook.  It was featured in The Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald.

 

Thursday, June 20, 2024

Interview With Author Don Rocca About His Memoir

 


About The Book: 

I stood in front of the headstone which read:

 

“Rita Rocca Nee Tomlin (15/6/1942 - 21/10/2020)” and thought, 'Is this all there is? Her name on a headstone with mine to follow.’

 

I remembered a warm May Day in 1948, when we both kneeled at the same altar waiting for a priest to give us our first taste of Jesus.

 

She, in her white dress, was wondering if the day would yield enough for a new doll and pram, while I wondered if mine would yield enough for roller skates and maybe a new football.

 

I recalled the honeymoon in Jersey in 1963, Miss World at the Royal Albert Hall in 1980, and the ball that followed at the Savoy Hotel.

 

I said, "Sorry girl, I can't give you a Taj Mahal, but I will write a book, which will hopefully make us more than just names on a tombstone."

 

 

1: What is your book, Memories of The Way We Were, about?

 

It’s about the early morning of my life, though it starts by recalling the early years of my father’s life.

 

It tells how he progressed from being a poor Italian immigrant, to becoming a successful business man, and the first alien to become a citizen of the Irish free State.

I tell how in the 194Os and 50s, we sometimes travelled across Europe and holidayed in Tuscany and beyond. I remember how in 1947 my brother and I played chasing each other around war ravaged Dunkirk.

 

In early 1960 I started my seagoing career, voyaging to such places as Algiers, where war was raging. The following years my ships took me to such places as Communist China….The American Great Lakes….East Germany…. South America…..the Philippines and Japan. Sometimes in dreams I can still smell the aroma of copra as we passed South Pacific islands.

 

2. What inspired you to write?

 

One day my business partner and I were servicing a Northrop Grumman Sperry marine Radar, and I noticed the Captain seemed amused that two old men could still climb tall Radar masts. Reflecting on this, we decided we had reached our sell by date, so we terminated our NGSM agency and continued on a much-reduced basis. Having more time on my hands I started to put some memories on paper.  When my wife died, I stood at her grave one day and recalled Peggy Lee’s song ‘Is This All There Is?’ I finished my manuscript and sent it to Austin McAuley Publishers in the UK where it was accepted.

 

3. You are about to turn 83. As you reflect back on your life what stands out for you?

 

My generation were lucky to be born into a world at peace. The Marshall plan was a great success and it was a tide that lifted all boats. We had American comics with Batman and Superman. We had fabulous Hollywood movies. We had Rock and Roll music. We had ice cream parlours, where we sat and listened to Buddy Holly singing ‘All my love, all my kissing, you don’t know what you’ve been a missing’. Now my sun is well past its zenith, and I see the dogs of war are gathering again. We can only hope that the man who now looks so frail will prevail again when Autumn comes.

 

4. You spent many years as a seagoing radio officer. What was that like?

 

Well, I had a nice big comfortable cabin and an equally big Radio room, fitted with state -of-the-art equipment, which allowed me to communicate across oceans. I could call Chatham Radio WCC Long Island from the Canary Islands or San Francisco Radio KFS from Honolulu. Before going to my bunk at night, I often went out to the bridge with a mug of coffee, and myself and the officer on watch, would stare into the vast Ocean, and discuss how we would solve the problems of the world. Some nights crossing ice berg alley with a full moon shining on a large berg and a glassy sea, it almost made me believe there might be a God.

 

5. Does life on a boat look much better than on land?

 

Well, the first thing to say is that no mariner, excluding those in submarines, would ever refer to a ship as a boat. Ships carried boats. Long voyages could at times be boring. Imagine a forty-two-day voyage from London to Tsamkong in Red China and an equally boring week there? It did get better after a two-day voyage from Tsamkong to Hong Kong.

In my day the majority of ships carried about forty men so there was plenty of room to relax on deck and sunbathe if the weather was good. Depending on the Chief steward and chief cook the food could be okay to excellent.

 

We could buy cigarettes and alcohol at ridiculously low prices. We always had a small library and sometimes a few films. We also had the occasional party, particularly if it was someone’s birthday. These occasions had to be fitted in, between watches. My watches were two hours on and two hours off over a fourteen-hour day. Of course, sometimes the two hours off and indeed the ten-hour off for sleeping, sometimes had to be abandoned, if I was called out to repair the radar, send an important message, or copy important weather or ice reports. The deck and engineer staff worked four hours on and fours off. This might give you some idea why sailors partied and enjoyed female company when the opportunity arose.

 

6. You were born in Dublin Ireland to an Irish mother and Italian father during World War II. What was your childhood like?

 

Our house was one of forty-eight situated in a nice part of Dublin. The estate was a cul-de-sac with only one way in and one way out. It could have been designed as a haven for children to play, and we did play, boys and girls together, sometimes in summer from nine till sundown.

 

Ireland’s population was only two million and the primary industry was agriculture, so even in wartime, no one went hungry, or at least there was no reason why they should. Some things were rationed like tea, but that was of little interest to us. Petrol was difficult to get, but my father ran his old Ford on charcoal gas, which incidentally he manufactured himself as a sideline. Well actually it was made by three Italians, the government had interned when WW2 broke out. They were handed over to my father with their absolute agreement.

 

They were very well fed and paid. What a lovely way to spend a war!

 

As an infant I went to a convent school mainly for girls and then primary school with lay teachers. As I already said, we had American comics and Hollywood films. Things got better when the war ended, and we got a new Ford V8 in 1948. In the early fifties we got a 14-inch black and white television.

 

7. What was it like serving in the British Merchant Navy in the 1960s

 

It was good and I only suffered the occasional anti Irish remark. I always had a nice cabin and office. Every meal was silver service in dining saloons where every table had crisp white cloths with silver cutlery. I normally sat at the Captain’s table along with the deck officers. The Engineers sat at the Chief Engineer’s table. He was the second most senior man on board. In fact, the C/E was considered by some, to be almost equal in rank to the Captain.

 

 

Much of the mealtime conversations were about the war. Many of the senior men had served on Merchant ships. Some even served in the Royal Navy. Some survived being sunk by

 

U boats only to wind up as POWs. Others talked about Dunkirk and others talked about fighting the German and Italian navies in the Mediterranean Sea.

As a half Italian coming from a neutral country, I just listened to their fascinating stories.

 

8.  Did you ever have any dangerous situations arise while at sea?

 

It was December 1961 and the MV POLAMHALL was sailing in the roaring 40s off the South African coast, when we lost engine power. We started to roll like we were in a tumble dryer, and matters weren’t helped by the Second Officer remarking “I hope our cargo of iron ore doesn’t shift or we’ll be swimming with the fishes” The Captain ordered me to advise all ships in the area that we were not under command, and should consider us to be a navigation hazard. I also advised the Naval base at Simonstown we were not in distress but would advise them should our situation deteriorate. The engineers did eventually get the main engine going on reduced power, and we limped in to Walvis Bay for repairs.

 

In February 1963 the mv. Baron. Ardrossan was sailing across the Bay of Biscay when we were hit by a storm of hurricane strength. It came up so quickly we had no time to heave to and head into it, which is the safest thing to do.


Trying to go on reciprocal course would have been extremely dangerous, so we had to stay on course while the storm battered into our stern. The view from the wheelhouse was a mountain of water running away from us. It actually didn’t  stop our second officer going out briefly onto the for’d deck to record it on his cine camera. He was from the Isle of Man!

 

We lost two lifeboats which wouldn’t have helped us anyway, and all the lower accommodation was flooded. The starboard weather door was stoved in but the ship’s carpenter and crew managed to shore it up with heavy blocks of timber. My cabin and the Captain’s suffered no damage as we were housed on the top deck. The chief officer put his best helmsman on the wheel and we made the safety of Falmouth harbour.

 

March 1961 the mv ARCTIC previously named Hollywood was alongside in Baton Rouge when the city was hit with the outer edge of a hurricane. At the time the storm hit I was in a local bar with some of the crew, and crew members from other ships. It was too dangerous to leave so we just partied along with the bar staff all night, and returned to our ship the next morning. A very happy memory!

 

9. How would you describe your writing style? I’d say nothing heavy or too academic, just easy going. The feedback I get is that readers feel they are present with me as they travel from page to page.

 

10. What challenges did you have in penning your book? No great challenges really. I’d just write a few chapters and leave it for a week or two before resuming. I relied on my memory and some old letters and diaries. I also consulted with some old colleagues I sailed with.


About The Author: The author, Donal Rocca, also known as Don Rocca was born on 5th August 1941 in Dublin, Ireland to an Irish mother and Italian father. After a formal education by nuns, lay teachers and Christian brothers, he started his third level education in Atlantic College Dublin followed by Kevin St College, Dublin. Further third level education spanning more than forty years took place in Plymouth Technical College and Company courses run by Marconi, AEI, and Racal-to name but a few.Don became a seagoing radio officer with Marconi Marine in 1960 and in 1966 he joined their staff as a marine technical assistant. In 1974, he joined the Decca Radar Co. later Racal Decca rising to Dublin area manager in 1984. In 1993, Don in association with Kieran Campbell started their own marine electronics company. Camroc Electronic Ltd. CAMROC...CAMPBELL ROCCA. Don is still owner and joint managing director of Camroc Electronic Ltd.

 

For more info, please see: https://www.amazon.com/Memories-Way-We-Were-Rocca-ebook/dp/B0C3MZHMZX/ref=sr_1_4?crid=2RUKBVJ0RCILO&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.4Hqbjiq-ZzUyN6xPJLTtx9w42I6FP4R2yKWC1MaqDHECAHznVu6hd6GgOk8Lp98gp7-gbIyCkuJcz_MDQw9-cdphEuHxI-1y-c5Y7QcSW4S_0_ER1V7tTYVUeMM2rJ5pFozqeFxHisoHeiIGcG3ybn8hssBWHYRYcsqDvZLfXaoxYUuGrH1BSEHpQXPaFsA4F8cJ3H1tDF99KiaeRLBhVhPom0DqoDzUF2lUyNwSq2Y.cJk1nUIqJmpSTKqA8RisWOFrj6LpMneUu6EW9bV5afQ&dib_tag=se&keywords=Memories+of+The+Way+We+Were&qid=1718934359&sprefix=memories+of+the+way+we+were%2Caps%2C72&sr=8-4

 

Need PR Help?

Brian Feinblum, the founder of this award-winning blog, with over 3.9 million page views, can be reached at brianfeinblum@gmail.com  He is available to help authors promote their story, sell their book, and grow their brand. He has over 30 years of experience in successfully helping thousands of authors in all genres. Let him be your advocate, teacher, and motivator!

 

About Brian Feinblum

Brian Feinblum should be followed on www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2024. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester with his wife, two kids, and Ferris, a black lab rescue dog, and El Chapo, a pug rescue dog. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s The Independent.  This award-winning blog has generated over 3.9 million pageviews. With 4,900+ posts over the past dozen years, it was named one of the best book marketing blogs by BookBaby  http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  and recognized by Feedspot in 2021 and 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. It was also named by www.WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” For the past three decades, including 21 years as the head of marketing for the nation’s largest book publicity firm, and director of publicity positions at two independent presses, Brian has worked with many first-time, self-published, authors of all genres, right along with best-selling authors and celebrities such as: Dr. Ruth, Mark Victor Hansen, Joseph Finder, Katherine Spurway, Neil Rackham, Harvey Mackay, Ken Blanchard, Stephen Covey, Warren Adler, Cindy Adams, Todd Duncan, Susan RoAne, John C. Maxwell, Jeff Foxworthy, Seth Godin, and Henry Winkler. He hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America several years ago, and has spoken at ASJA, Independent Book Publishers Association Sarah Lawrence College, Nonfiction Writers Association, Cape Cod Writers Association, Willamette (Portland) Writers Association, APEX, Morgan James Publishing, and Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association. His letters-to-the-editor have been published in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, New York Post, NY Daily News, Newsday, The Journal News (Westchester) and The Washington Post. His first published book was The Florida Homeowner, Condo, & Co-Op Association Handbook.  It was featured in The Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald.


 

Interview With Author Linda F. Robertson, Ph.D.


 


 

1. What inspired you to write this book?   As I interacted with international students, teachers and scholars, and would tell stories of my growing up on a ranch in Wyoming, they would always say, "You have such interesting stories, you should write a book."   Then I retired at 74 during the pandemic. So, I wrote a book.

 

2. What exactly is it about and who is it written for?  As a leadership scholar, I thought it was a leadership book.   But as I see people react to it, I realize it is a reflective exercise for people to think of their own childhood, influences in their childhood that shaped their lives.  It combines my early childhood education background, my love of my Wyoming background, my pride in my global work, and my study of leadership.

 

About The Book: Explore the vanishing Wyoming sheep ranching life of the 1950s while pondering parenting influences on your children to develop into leaders for the complexity of tomorrow's world.  I take you on a ride of personal adventures set in the solitude of Wyoming's sagebrush prairie and globally in far flung places such as Kyrgyzstan and Nigeria.  Madae richer with family photos, My details about the day-to-day life on the ranch with developing dispositions for leadership.  Each chapter ends with a question inviting the readers to. ponder their own childhood experiences.   Finish the book laughing as you discover the story of "Bull Sh*t with Cream on It."

 

3. What do you hope readers will get out of reading your book?   I want people to enjoy the book, to be informed, to think about things in new and different ways, and the enjoy the reading.

 

4. How did you decide on your book’s title and cover design?    I have a photo collage of a child on a stick horse with a bucking bronc and bull in the background like the image in the child's head.   That inspired the book design.  The title of the book comes from the first time I told on my myself--I said, "Bull shit with cream on it,"  when I had a bike wreck.   But later thinking it was funny, I told my mother--who, of course, scolded me for saying words like that at 8 years old.   Now I have written a book of stories on myself.  

 

5. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers – other than run!?

Share your writing and ideas early on with others.   I started, threw away the first attempt.   Then with this book, I was too eager for it to be done.   Get advice on layout, size of font, have people with different backgrounds read for different perspectives.   

 

6. What trends in the book world do you see -- and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading? AI is going to change everything about publishing.   Memoirs will be somewhat protected from AI because it is a personal experience.   This may make them special in the future. 

 

7. Were there experiences in your personal life or career that came in handy when writing this book?  I always have been a risk taker, an innovator.   I hadn't written a book, but that didn't stop me.   I interviewed lots of relatives and Wyoming ranchers.  I connected with a family in deep and meaningful ways.  I am like a border collier, I gather up my resources, and then feel content.   After the informal research and lots of walking in the parks of Ohio, I was ready to write.  

 

8. How would you describe your writing style? Which writers or books is your writing similar to? In typical fashion for me, after I wrote the book, I read many memoirs of Wyoming ranching life.   I realize that I was trying to still be the life-long educator in writing this memoir.   It is a parenting book, a leadership book, a reflective book, a history book, a memoir--and only 164 pages.   If I had it to do over, I would try to simplify that.  

 

9. What challenges did you overcome in the writing of this book? First attempt was too academic.   Threw it out after a couple of friends read the first chapter.  I write like I talk--we had big discussions with friends who were my informal editors about whether the words should be like I am telling stories, or should it be written more formally.   The compromise is somewhat in the book.   I am a very direct, informal person.  My early schooling was not very sophisticated, and with uneducated parents, even with a PHD, my writing and oral language is still simple.  I didn't realize the need to rewrite, rewrite, and rewrite, and how really valuable that is.

 

10. If people can buy or read one book this week or month, why should it be yours? This is a book to put on your desk.   When you have a decision to make, have a bad day, need some advice on something, consult the chapter, the Will Rogers quote.   When you need a "hug," read about the home life of this family who seemed to overcome obstacles with grace and purpose.   It isn't necessary a book to read and forget.  It is a book to read and use.

 

About The Author:

FACEBOOK posts about the book and many presentations in Wyoming and Ohio.  Last one:  https://www.facebook.com/share/p/7avdZvMZhYFQWmAz/?mibextid=WC7FNe

LinkedIn posts about the book.  Last one: 

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/linda-robertson-55972115_williamboyd-leadership-parenting-activity-7206064872374067200-SXlp?utm_source=share&utm_medium=member_ios

 

Need PR Help?

Brian Feinblum, the founder of this award-winning blog, with over 3.9 million page views, can be reached at brianfeinblum@gmail.com  He is available to help authors promote their story, sell their book, and grow their brand. He has over 30 years of experience in successfully helping thousands of authors in all genres. Let him be your advocate, teacher, and motivator!

 

About Brian Feinblum

Brian Feinblum should be followed on www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2024. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester with his wife, two kids, and Ferris, a black lab rescue dog, and El Chapo, a pug rescue dog. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s The Independent.  This award-winning blog has generated over 3.9 million pageviews. With 4,900+ posts over the past dozen years, it was named one of the best book marketing blogs by BookBaby  http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs  and recognized by Feedspot in 2021 and 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. It was also named by www.WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” For the past three decades, including 21 years as the head of marketing for the nation’s largest book publicity firm, and director of publicity positions at two independent presses, Brian has worked with many first-time, self-published, authors of all genres, right along with best-selling authors and celebrities such as: Dr. Ruth, Mark Victor Hansen, Joseph Finder, Katherine Spurway, Neil Rackham, Harvey Mackay, Ken Blanchard, Stephen Covey, Warren Adler, Cindy Adams, Todd Duncan, Susan RoAne, John C. Maxwell, Jeff Foxworthy, Seth Godin, and Henry Winkler. He hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America several years ago, and has spoken at ASJA, Independent Book Publishers Association Sarah Lawrence College, Nonfiction Writers Association, Cape Cod Writers Association, Willamette (Portland) Writers Association, APEX, Morgan James Publishing, and Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association. His letters-to-the-editor have been published in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, New York Post, NY Daily News, Newsday, The Journal News (Westchester) and The Washington Post. His first published book was The Florida Homeowner, Condo, & Co-Op Association Handbook.  It was featured in The Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald.