Follow by Email

Friday, March 25, 2016

The Trump University Of Book Promotions



Political and news junkies like me find it quite interesting to see how the news media not only covers but furthers the Donald Trump phenomenon.  Here’s what can be learned about the media, based on what it’s done through nearly half of the scheduled primaries:

1.      It spent a disproportionate amount of time covering his candidacy. The more the media covered him, the more important he seemed, so the more the media continued to cover him.

3.      When other candidates were discussed, it was often because it was about how they were involved in a Trump statement or controversy.

4.      The debates, which then get covered by the media, disproportionately gave the floor to Trump.  Because he led in the polls, he was given the center spot on stage, not only projecting him as being in the middle of the action but physically placing him in between every conversation or statement.

5.      Because Trump has a big Twitter following, the media likes to comment on his Twitter feed, again, keeping him in the limelight.

6.      Trump constantly gave the media an outrageous soundbite to cover every day.  Other candidates rely on making proposals on policy to get attention but he just says someone’s an idiot and gets himself coverage.

7.      He projects leadership and speaks with a surly conviction that, like a car wreck, you just can’t look away.  The media is drawn to this character, not because they like his views but because they love his walking reality show antics.

8.      Because, people can’t believe how ridiculous he sounds, they keep talking about him. It’s easier to discuss him dissing the Pope, calling Cruz a liar, and accusing little Rubio of something than to weigh the sensibilities of what Kasich would do if he were president.

9.      Trump is telegenic – from his towering posture, to strong voice, to his faux hair, to his toughness – he draws you in, nudging you to watch as you dare him to stumble.

10.  Even if we disagree with his vitriol, we marvel at how he gets away with speaking his mind.  He has no filter and many people appreciate that even if we should expect more from someone who wants to be president.

11.  His blue language though offensive, again, draws you in because it makes it seem like this billionaire is one of us.

12.  Though he can bite with criticism, he gives off a we-can-win vibe.  Ok, so Charlie Sheen was the last person to talk about winning, and he had a meltdown, but the media wants a cheerleader and Trump is great at championing America.

However, because the media has fed us Trump 24-7, and because some people are fed up with the government, he has propelled himself into the lead of a national party.  No one really thought it would ever get to this, but it has.  The media played a big role in elevating Trump to this spot.

So how can publishers and authors apply lessons from the political coverage that has ensued?


·         Be controversial, outrageous, and colorful.
·         Attack daily with a new message.
·         Don’t be politically correct – speak your mind.
·         Don’t expect to appeal to everyone, but rattle the base.
·         Be funny and nutty.
·         Change the rules – don’t follow a script.

·         Create a persona, a bigger than life ego or image.

Publicists and marketers will study the Trump candidacy for years to come, whether he wins or loses in the primaries – or the general election should he get there.  Authors and publishers need to Trump their books and figure out how to sell books in a way that’s never been done before.


2016 Book Marketing & Book Publicity Toolkit



Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2016

1 comment:

  1. The thought behind this post is interesting - how can the ability of Trump to draw attention be used to sell books? Most of the advice can be heeded by authors looking to promote their work. But I have a huge problem with advising: "Don’t be politically correct – speak your mind."

    You've created a false dichotomy here. Being PC does not mean "do not speak your mind." It means "speak your mind in a way that is mindful of the thoughts and feeling of others." Sure, you might get attention and sell more books if you're as unfiltered as Trump. But at what cost? Disregarding the thoughts and feelings of others so that you can say whatever you want in order to draw media attention and sell books will lead to your basest, most obnoxious, and most hurtful thoughts laid bare (as we've seen with Trump).

    What will this do to your personal brand? What will this do to the general discourse in your industry, or the the national conversation? What will it do to your soul?

    ReplyDelete