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Friday, July 13, 2018

Authors Should Follow This Advice On Speaking



I had the opportunity to see an advance copy of the 20th anniversary edition of Knockout Presentations:  How to Deliver Your Message with Power, Punch and Pizzazz by Diane DiResta.  Morgan James Publishing will release it in the fall.  Though her advice is for speakers of all situations, especially business, much of what she writes about, based on decades of experience, is directly applicable to authors.

Some of the myths you should expect to overcome are as follows:

“I’m not a public speaker.”

Oh, but you are.  Anytime you talk – at a bookstore library, school, church, office – or just one on one – you use the power of persuasion – from body language and voice, to energy and word choice.

“Look over the heads of the audience when speaking.”

Why? Look, instead, directly at specific people.  Connect with your eyes.  Look at a few people, one at a time.  This creates a feeling of a relationship.

“Memorize Your Speech.”

Don’t read a speech but don’t try to memorize it either.  Let it flow naturally.  Memorize certain, concepts or ideas – but not whole sentences or specific words.  Have some notes or outlines handy.

“Cover all of your points in a speech.”

Rather than trying to cram too much into one speech, where you feel rushed or overwhelm the audience, focus on a few major points and let the speech serve as a teaser for one to buy your book, go to your site, or take an action step.

DiResta also cautioned speakers not to start with a joke, saying “You don’t have to be funny to be effective.”  I disagree wholeheartedly.  Lighten things up with humor and wit – but make sure that what you say is truly funny.  Test it.  Scrub it to make sure no one can misinterpret what you say.  The last thing you want is a shit storm over a perceived misstep.  Leave sex, race, religion, and politics out – unless the crowd you are in front of (and your book) relates to a specific topic that’s relevant to one of them.

Of course speakers need to properly prepare for a presentation, which includes showing up early to make sure your equipment (if you use any) is set up.  She cautions you should make sure that you:

·         Know what type of audience you’re presenting to.
·         Don’t speak in a monotone voice.
·         Present in a focused manner.
·         Introduce details further into your presentation.
·         Provide strong evidence or examples to back up your points/claims.

Authors need to speak to sell books.  They can set up presentations for 10 people or 500+. Venues vary, but the speech may remain relevant to all.  The key is to provide useful content, present yourself in a fun or inspiring manner, and to find ways to connect with those you speak to.  Ask the audience questions and let them ask you questions, if possible.  Provide handouts or guide them to a link for more information.

Authors like to write, rather than speak.  Some are shy or insecure about their appearance or voice.  Others stumble on their words and forget what to say.  But if you can practice and prepare – and find friendly places to present – you’ll soon find that it’s rewarding to speak.

Good luck!


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Enjoy New 2018 Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit -- 7th annual edition just released


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Book Highlights American Lit's History



American Lit 101: A Crash Course in American Literature highlights the accomplishments of important American writers and identifies which voices played a vital role in shaping the literary landscape of America.  It includes hundreds of rich tidbits as it provides a refresher on American literature. Author Brianne Keith covers dozens of authors in her book, including these:

·         Thomas Paine
·         Thomas Jefferson
·         Benjamin Franklin
·         Washington Irving
·         Henry David Thoreau
·         Ralph Waldo Emerson
·         Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
·         J.D. Salinger
·         Edgar Allan Poe
·         Herman Melville
·         Nathaniel Hawthorne
·         Walt Whitman
·         Frederick Douglas
·         Harriet Beecher Stowe
·         Emily Dickinson
·         Mark Twain
·         Henry James
·         Judith Wharton
·         Jack London
·         William Faulkner
·         Ezra Pound
·         T.S. Eliot
·         John Steinbeck
·         Robert Frost


Here are select passages from this most interesting of books:

Introduction
It may seem that literature has no bearing on our day-to-day lives, but it certainly does.  Writers and literature express a shared understanding of a time and place in history – it is through their voices that we have an opportunity to gain a greater understanding of ourselves and our world…

Aristotle said that art can purge us of our emotions as they are mirrored back to us.  The same is true of literature.  We understand the beliefs and values of our age as they are reflected back to us by the words and actions of the characters we read in a book, or the pitch and tone of a voice in a poem.  Through this understanding we can find solidarity with each other, and also find the words to define the differences among us – all comprising the fabric of our lives…

American literature reflects the endurance of the American spirit and surge of creative forces at play in American culture.

Philip Freneau: The Poet of the American Revolution
While pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, and proclamations dominated the American literary landscape during the late eighteenth century, American poetry was still thriving – albeit in the background.  The Puritan poets had set the stage, becoming the first published poets in the New World, but their subject matter was English.  The colonists were beginning to yearn for their own.  “American” literature that expressed the new America that was beginning to form.  As the colonists broke free from Britain’s rule, they were also eager to break free of its literature.  It was time for a literature of America.

Creating an American Literature
Shortly after 1840, America had a burst of creativity called the American Renaissance, during which a small group of writers produced some of the best and most creative writing in its literary history.  The movement came on the heels of the romantic movement, which had swept across Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and cleared the way for a more dramatic, imaginative, and instinctual literature.  American writers now felt able to free themselves from old literary forms and traditions to produce creative work that came from their own impulses, whatever form those took.

Walt Whitman
With Leaves of Grass, America finally had a poetry that could express the American experience in both form and content.  While Longfellow wrote about American subjects, he used traditional poetic forms and structures that, yes, delighted readers but didn’t seem to fully capture the American voice.  Whitman’s poetry dug deep – it was raw, spoke of the “barbarism and material” of the times, and spoke with a fresh new voice, a “barbaric yawp.”

Mark Twain: American Humorist and “Dean of American Literature”
Mark Twain (1835-1910) wasn’t born in the Northeast (the literary hub of America in the mid-nineteenth century), didn’t come from a wealthy family or have a college degree, and writing wasn’t his dream career (being a riverboat captain was).  Nevertheless, Twain achieved a level of literary prestige and worldwide celebrity during his lifetime that was nearly unsurpassed at the time.  He is still celebrated today as one of America’s finest writers and humorists.

Typewriting First
Mark Twain was one of the first writers to use a typewriter to compose his works.  However, later in life he invested – and lost – a great deal of money in an automatic typesetting machine.

Stephen Crane: Live Fast, Die Young
Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was the kind of person you might find at a seedy bar well past last call.  Crane befriended prostitutes, chain-smoked, and became a fixture of the 1890s Bowery district scene in New York.  In his lifetime, he survived a shipwreck, sailed to Greece, mingled with famous writers, inspired writers generations older than him, and established a new field of literature.  He did this all in the short twenty eight years he was alive.

Crane wrote the novel he is most famous for, The Red Badge of Courage (1895). Though Crane never served in any war, his portrayal of the psychological effects of war remarkably realistic.  The novel tells the tale of the Civil War from the point of view of a soldier.

Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism is a literary device through which an author gives human characteristics to animals or nonliving objects.  Anthropomorphism allows authors to explore sensitive social issues in a nonthreatening way.  A famous example is George Orwell’s Animal Farm, published in 1945.  Orwell used the device to satirize Stalin and make a statement about the danger of dictatorship.

The Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby (1925) defined the twenties.  The Great Gatsby is a lyrically written tale of glitz, glamour, and enchantment.  At its core is the romanticism of the American dream that drove the era.  Also at its core is a statement of how that dream, in the end, is empty.

Written in Pencil
Steinbeck used 300 pencils to write his novel East of Eden.  Typewriters existed then, but Steinbeck preferred to write by pencil.

Robert Frost
Robert Frost (1874-1963) is one of America’s most beloved poets.  Who doesn’t recognize the lines, “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood” or “Miles to go before I sleep”?  Perhaps you’ve even used them yourself in conversation.  Frost’s poems have become so popular that they have become ingrained in our American idiom.

Blank verse is made up of iambic pentameters (five iambic feet per line).  Many major writers – Shakespeare, Milton, and Wordsworth – used blank verse, a highly adaptable meter.  Frost used blank verse because it allowed him to capture the natural rhythms of colloquial speech.

Postwar Literature
In the 1940s and 1950s, a small group of writers, disparagingly termed “beatniks,” started writing works that were obscene and experimental, and openly discussed almost every taboo topic under the sun.  Underneath all of the raucousness of their writings lay an important message:  Despair still runs through American culture.  Their writings reflected how, in exchange for stability and comfort, Americans had traded their source of vitality – creativity.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, poetry began to explore this message from another angle:  the personal “I.”  A new type of poetry called confessional poetry developed that discussed subject matters considered taboo for the politically conservative era-tropics such as depression, death, and relationships – from a deeply personal and intimate perspective.  The works of Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, and Robert Lowell ushered in a new style that influenced writers for decades to come.

Allen Ginsberg
Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) was the leading poet of the beats.  His poetry collection Howl became the poetic center of the Beat Generation.

J.D. Salinger
Rounding out our literary voices of the young generation of the 1950s is Holden Caulfield, the fiction protagonist of The Catcher in the Rye (1951) by J.D. Salinger (1919-2010).  Salinger’s portrayal of teen angst is so convincing and sincere that many young people felt Salinger “knew” them and that they “knew” him – something that provided to be very annoying to the author.  The enormous success of The Catcher in the Rye was so annoying, in fact, it sent Salinger fleeing to Cornish, a remote hill town in New Hampshire.

Salinger became one of America’s most famous literary recluses.  For years he refused to grant interviews or publish anything after his last collection of stories in 1961(though he said he was still writing).  When he died in 2010, everyone wanted to know who had access to his unpublished work and whether it would ever be published.  Dozens of articles were published over these questions.  The public is still hungry for a glimpse into this elusive hermit’s life.

The Catcher in the Rye and Holden Caulfield still survive as the voice of disaffected youth.  It’s had more than forty printings, has sold millions of copies, and still sells over 200,000 copies a year.

Arthur Miller: Death of a Salesman
Loman is an aging Brooklyn salesman who can’t come to terms with the fact that he is being thoughtlessly fired from a job he loyally served for thirty-four years and that his son, Biff, can’t (and doesn’t want to) find a job in sales. Even though he’s just been dealt a humiliating blow by his company, Willy still sees business as the only way to success, while Biff sees it as a dead end:  he’d rather work outside with his hands.

After a series of schizophrenic-like episodes in which Willy reminisces about the past (and escapes from is present situation), he begins to crack.  In a moment of frustration, Biff tries to get Willy to come to terms with reality – that both he and his father are just average men who are destined for ordinary lives.  “Pop,” he says, “I’m nothing!  I’m nothing.  Pop.  Can’t you understand that? There’s no spite in it any more.  I’m just what I am, that’s all.”  Willy resists, ultimately driven by shallowness and empty values.  He is unable to establish a real relationship with his son because he is under the spell of another, more illusory reality – the American dream.

Contemporary American Literature and Beyond
In the 1960s through the 1970s, writers began to blur the lines between fact and fiction in works that explored crime and pop culture.  Truman Capote, Tom Wolfe, and Norman Mailer all contributed to new forms like the nonfiction novel and New Journalism.  The middle class became a dominant theme, as America became more suburban and people began feeling more stifled.  Magical realism – a literary technique that blends fact and fiction, fantasy and reality, first established by Latin writers- made its way into American fiction.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

What Must Authors Consider When Marketing A Book?




A full-page ad in the Sunday Book Review section of The New York Times is listed at $41,955, while a half-page ad goes for $24,200.  Compare that to the MSRP of several luxury cars – BMW 3 ($33,150) Cadillac ATS ($33,215), or a Lexus ES ($38,100).  Which one provides you with better value?

Or are you best served by a book publicity campaign that can run you $10,000 to $25,000, depending on the duration and depth of service provided?  As one who makes his living in book marketing, I can tell you that your money – if spent wisely – will see a pay-off when you utilize a proven book publicity pro to build your brand, market your book, and publicize your messages.

Oh, did I mention The Times charges extra for things like color ($9,420 extra for a full-page)?  If you want the back cover, add in another $2,215.  Willing to settle for your ad to fall on page six, that’s another $1,000!  So the cost of a full-page, full-color, premium positioned ad on Sunday costs over $53,000!!!  That would cover two Mazda Mazda 3’s or the price of two substantial book campaigns that could last six months each – versus a single day, single publication attempt to influence enough people to sell enough books to make it worthwhile.

You get the point.  I’m not anti-Times, nor do I think ads are worthless.  For a handful of companies, full-page ads make sense.  For 99.99999% of all writers and publishers, a solid book publicity campaign that’s driven by an experienced, paid advocate makes more sense.

Authors and publishers try to get a grip on what they can do that will move the dial and too many fall short when doing a few things in a half-assed way and they are left to incorrectly conclude that nothing seems to help them sell books.

It’s logical that we look for quick fixes – the big ad, the review at a key publication, a morning TV interview, a paid speaking gig before a huge audience – but we need to earn media exposure and place it into perspective.  What most of us need is the fortitude to persevere daily in a grass-roots campaign that builds up one’s brand while incrementally increasing book sales.  It takes a lot of little things to add up into something substantial.

I laugh when authors tell me a publisher “has publicity covered” or when an author says “I should be on every major TV show” or when a literary agent claims “Every bookstore should carry this book.”  Really?  Don’t believe the hype.  No one has everything covered and the media and bookstores need constant reminders, strong reasons, and lots of convincing to give coverage or shelf space to your book.  You’ll need to work at it. 

The book marketing landscape is huge. There are hundreds of media markets out there.  Do you have all 320 covered?

There are thousands of magazines, newspapers, major blogs, key websites, and leading podcasts – are you advertising in any of them?

There are thousands of bookstores across the US – are you speaking at any of them?

There are well over 100,000 libraries in America – will you appear at any of them?

How often do you post on Twitter, FB, Instagram, Pinterest, Linked In, You Tube and leading social media platforms?  How much content – video, blogs, podcasts – do you create, and how do you disseminate it?  How are you going about getting more connections and followers?

There’s so much that could be done and a certain amount that has to be addressed every single day.  Don’t believe anyone is doing everything that’s needed and don’t expect anyone, like the media or a bookstore, will feel they should do anything for you.  It’s up to you – be smart, be realistic, be active – and get help.


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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.”


Monday, July 9, 2018

Interview With Cybersecurity Expert & Author O. Sami Saydjari




Engineering Trustworthy Systems: Get Cybersecurity Design Right the First Time


“This is the “bible” for cybersecurity, which needs to be consulted as we struggle to solve this enormous threat to our national security.”

--John M. Poindexter, PhD, Former National Security Advisor to President Ronald Reagan


Cybersecurity poses the leading threat to global commerce, the military, government agencies, individual privacy, and data integrity for leading institutions.  Tens of billions of dollars are spent annually to build, upgrade, and fix computer networks to withstand terrorism, hackers, spies, criminals, and corporate espionage.  The next generation of cybersecurity professionals needs to be armed with a comprehensive defense. internationally recognized cybersecurity expert O. Sami Saydjari has written the authoritative bible for crafting cutting-edge cybersecurity solutions to defend against even the most sophisticated attacks, Engineering Trustworthy Systems; Get Cybersecurity Design Right the First Time (McGraw-Hill, July 2018, 672 pages; Trade Paper, $60, ISBN: 978-1-260-11817-9).

This professional guide shows, step-by-step, how to design and deploy highly secure systems on time and within budget. It offers a comprehensive set of objectives and best practices and shows how to build and maintain powerful, cost-effective cybersecurity systems.  Whether you are a cyber-emergency responder, manager of information technology, or a red teamer, tester, accreditor, evaluator or systems designer, you will learn to think strategically, identify the highest priority risk, and apply advanced countermeasures that address the entire attack space.

Saydjari has been a visionary and thought-leader in cybersecurity for thirty-five years, working for elite organizations and government powers such as NSA, DARPA, the DoD, and NASA.  He has published more than a dozen papers in the field, consulted to national leaders on cybersecurity policy and has been featured in interviews with major media, including Time, CNN, The Washington Post, PBS, Wall Street Journal, ABC, and The Financial Times.  He is the founder and president of Cyber Defense Agency, a leading cybersecurity consulting firm.

1.      What trends are you seeing today when it comes to the newest threats in cybersecurity? Cyberattacks are becoming more frequent, complex, sophisticated, purposeful and targeted. The sheer volume of attacks is increasing exponentially.  It is only a matter of minutes between when a computer is first connected to the network and the first attack on that computer.  Attacks are now more complex--they employ more steps, and those steps attack more fundamental layers, such as operating systems.  They are more sophisticated--they leverage knowledge of flaws in systems design and of the defense systems themselves, steering around and underneath protections. They are more purposeful and targeted—when they attack, it is to gain some effect, such as ransomware to gain money, or Stuxnet to destroy centrifuges.

2.      Sami, what inspired you to publish Engineering Trustworthy Systems? Cyberattacks pose an existential threat to our entire society; addressing this problem has been a lifelong passion of mine. My career has spanned a good portion of the cybersecurity field. Much of the field grew and evolved as I was learning and applying it. There are many good books on particular aspects of cybersecurity, but there are none that really address the problem holistically, practically, and in an organized manner that starts with a foundational understanding of the problem. I feel it is important and urgent to confer this essential knowledge to the next generation so they can use timeless principles, developed over three decades, to solve important, emerging, and future problems.

3.      What can you do to ensure that those who engineer, maintain, or grow an electronic data and information system don’t come back to sabotage, blackmail, extort, steal, or destroy these bits and bytes? This is known generally as the insider threat problem. One addresses this problem through a three-layer architecture that is robust against any single security failure. The first is prevention, which creates bulkheads so that insiders cannot access all of the system if they have access to one part of the system.  The second layer is detection, which detects anomalous activities, such as accessing parts of the system that a person does not normally access. This indicates an intrusion or abnormal behavior suggesting insider activity. The third layer is tolerance, in which the system reconfigures itself to continue operation if the insider damages a portion of the system.

4.      What could global-scale cyberwarfare look like in a decade? Imagine a world without electrical power, telecommunications, money, and oil and gas to run essential machinery.  That is what global-scale cyberwarfare looks like.  Our society depends heavily on computers to run these critical infrastructures.  Cyberwarfare is capable of not only short-term disabling of these infrastructures, but actually physically damaging infrastructure such as electrical generators and transformers, for which there are no easy replacements.  The effect is the reduction of humanity back to a pre-modern world.  We must do everything possible to create a safer and more secure cyberspace to reduce the probability of an all-out global cyberwar because these consequences are as serious and significant as nuclear warfare.

5.      What are some of the bigger mistakes one makes when engineering a cybersecurity system? The first is to consider cybersecurity too narrowly. Most cybersecurity engineers specialize in firewalls or intrusion detection.  A more holistic approach, stressing how attacks and defenses interplay, is one of the hardest parts of the discipline and also the least well-understood by cybersecurity engineers today.  Another big mistake is underestimating the attacker’s breadth and depth, finding ways around or underneath defenses.  The breadth and depth of defenders must match that of the attackers.  Many people make the mistake of spending their budgets on one mechanism that someone claims is the next best thing, instead of considering a range of mechanisms and how much each reduces risk compared to cost.

6.      Why do some tend to think of cybersecurity as purely a technological problem?  Why is that bad? If you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Cybersecurity was invented by technology research engineers, so solutions have naturally been technology focused. We understand that the solutions involve a great variety of disciplines and ideas, including sociology, psychology, and decision theory. For example, phishing attacks use social engineering, which uses psychology to get an authorized user to unwittingly facilitate an attack. The psychology of users and the sociology of user communities working within systems is highly relevant.  There is some research in this direction, but it does not receive adequate attention today. The book addresses user behavior and how people really operate in cyberspace.

7.      How do cyberattacks pose an existential threat to our entire society? Many people think cyberspace is an optional space of convenience, enabling email or online shopping. In reality, every major infrastructure now depends critically on cyberspace, making it essential to modern life.  If a city such as New York loses access to rail deliveries because of a cyberattack, it could not survive beyond three days, thus requiring complete evacuation. Because cyberattacks can destroy physical things, the consequence is not a matter of inconvenience for a day, but rather regional devastation lasting years. If the Unites States or any like nation were to lose power for six months, its very sovereignty would be at stake. That is the level of threat we are now experiencing in this world, and it is untenable.

8.      Based on your successful career experiences, your book provides wisdom from those who worked at NASA, Department of Defense, IBM, Honeywell, Cornell University, Columbia University, National Science Foundation, DARPA, Naval Research Lab, Carnegie Mellon University, Orincon, and dozens of other leading institutions, corporations, and government agencies.  Does it surprise you that everyone knows pieces of cybersecurity but few, if any, truly command complete knowledge of it? It is no surprise at all. Research in the community developed in a fragmented way. There were intrusion-detection researchers, firewall, and cryptographic researchers. Thus, each discipline grew and developed their own sub-disciplines, their own sub-lingos and their own sub-communities. Often, these sub-communities did not communicate with one another and, in fact, often disrespected the other’s contribution. At DARPA, I focused on bringing together these disciplines, including outside disciplines such as reliability and dependability, to address the problem systematically. We continue to need the deep expertise in areas such as firewall design, but we also need the generalists who understand the strengths and weaknesses of a broad set of mechanisms and how they can be woven together for effective defense.

9.  What does the cybersecurity solution landscape look like? We are used to thinking in only three dimensions. Cyberspace is hyper-dimensional, with hundreds of dimensions. The cybersecurity solution landscape is thus equally complicated. An attacker can get from one side of the world to the other in minutes, and a cyber weapon that costs a few dollars to create can cause millions of dollars of damage. If an attacker has a zero-day attack (i.e., one that has never been seen before) in the operating system, the attacker comes from underneath, as if reaching out from underground and grabbing your feet. If we do not foresee such attacks, it's hard to defend against them. This book helps cybersecurity professionals to appreciate required solution space against the complex attack space.

10.  Do today’s business leaders and entrepreneurs have a proper foundation of understanding what needs to be done to protect their company’s transactions, data, and consumer privacy? Given the number of recent major breaches in supposedly well-defended systems, the answer is clearly no. Business leaders today are ill-equipped to understand threats to cybersecurity, the gravity of the consequences, or to distinguish good solutions crafted by experts from snake oil talismans sold by charlatans. In the same way that they must manage risk for their company’s funds, stock values, and vulnerability to competition, today’s leaders must broadly understand cybersecurity risk to make intelligent decisions to protect their companies. This book is written in such a way that company leadership can easily understand the broad concepts, while professional cybersecurity engineers can grasp the depths of how to design effective systems.

11.  You were mentored by Brian Snow, the former National Security Agency Technical Director of National Cryptologic School.  Who mentors those seeking to crack the cybersecurity of corporations, governments, or individuals? There are two cyberattacker worlds: informal hackers, who hack for fun and mischief, and professional (including military) attackers who attack for high stakes.  The hacker community has a hierarchy in which position is established by the coolness and difficulty of various attacks demonstrated to their colleagues. The best of the best, the so-called “uber hackers,” become mentors for the hackers who then create tools for what we call the “script kiddies”—those who attack using pre-made scripts, which they tailor without understanding what they’re doing. Professional attackers, on the other hand, have a normal organizational infrastructure in which experts rise up to the become mentors. Those cyberattackers are dangerous and capable of major destruction of cyberspace.

For more information, please see: www.EngineeringTrustworthySystems.com  

Please note: This author is a client for the public relations firm that I work for.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource