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Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Finding A Use For Old But Unread Content


What do you do with unexposed content?

It would first depend on the following:

·         What exactly is the content quality and the subject matter?
·         How old is it?
·         Why didn’t it get attention the first time?
·         How long is it?

·         It would then depend on:

·         Does it need to be updated and revised?
·         Should it be expanded or shortened?
·         Does it need to be reformatted to fit a different type of publication, such as turning a Facebook post into a tweet?
·         Do you want to recycle it, as is, to the same or a different readership?

Sometimes old or underexposed content was released at a bad time (on a holiday or during a breaking news cycle). Or, it wasn’t promoted properly. Or, you didn’t have many people to distribute it to initially.

Or maybe the content just sucked and came off as boring, poorly written, or too far off your targeted readership. 

The content you create can live many lives, thanks to the Internet. But it needs to be shaped for the needs of the different readers out there.

You can take, say an essay, and chop it up into three or four blog posts. Then you can chop those up into many tweets or Facebook posts. If you have visuals, you can post it to Instagram or Pinterest. Or orally read the content and make a podcast. Or videotape something and say the words for a post on YouTube.

Consider taking a blog post that didn’t generate many readers and spice it up. Re-write it so that it appeals to more people. If it’s dry, make it funny. If it’s deeply personal, see if you can include in-the-news examples and references so that it broadens its reach.

You can take your blog post and turn it into a letter to the editor or an article idea submission to a newspaper or magazine.

Think about packaging multiple blog posts together or supplementing an old post with something new. Dress it up with statistics, quotes, factoids, questions, or something catchy.

Never be content with your content. What’s old is new to someone, especially when few know it exists.


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Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2013



1 comment:

  1. I find my old content sounding awful. But I've heard other writers say their writing has improved with time. So there's a lot of wisdom to repurposing an idea to creating something new.

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