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Monday, November 18, 2019

Successful Media Coaching For Authors In 20 Steps


Image result for media coaching images

When authors are scheduled to be interviewed by the news media, they feel anxious and excited, which is what they should feel.  They also want to do well and perform at a high level. So what do you need to know to kick butt in your interviews?

Over the last several decades I have media-trained well over 1,000 authors one-on-one. The most common mistake that I see is that authors are either under prepared or overprepared. Some think because they talk a lot, perhaps as paid speakers or because they are good communicators, they don’t have to do any prep. Others, feeling insecure and worrying about even things that don’t exist, over prepare by trying to over-analyze the media outlet or trying to remember, word-for-word, what he or she wants to say.

Neither approach works well.

Here’s what does:

1. Now why you are doing the interview.  Is your message intended to push book sales, brand yourself, get people to your website, influence people, impact lives, get others to post on social media about you, or sell some other product or service? Once you prioritize and identify your goals, your message should fall in line to support them.

2. Preparation for your interview begins once you have an interview scheduled. Practice with someone. Record yourself to observe flaws. Be aware of how you sound and look. Make sure you exude good energy.

3. Prep for the topic that you anticipate they will discuss. Have stats/facts/stories at the ready to support the key points you want to share.

4. Draft suggested interview questions, perhaps 12-15 of them, and order them in a way that tells a story and allows you to get your most important points heard. Send those questions – along with your book, press materials, website link, and social media handles to the media outlet interviewing you.

5. Be aware of the news outlet’s demographics and style.  If you know something about the person who will interview you, even better.

6. Know what’s trending in your area of expertise and be aware of the news cycle. Is there a way to connect your message to what’s being discussed now?

7. Watch interviews in all forms – TV, podcast, radio and print. Look at and listen to athletes, politicians, CEOs, actors and other industry experts just to see different styles.

8. Can you tie into an honorary day, holiday, anniversary, season, or special event? If so, it makes your message that much more timely and relevant.

9. Relax, and take a positive approach to this. It will be fun. Yes, fun.  You’ll feel the adrenaline rush and love the whole process. Here you are, given an opportunity to talk about what you know best and love – you!  The interview is usually one-on-one, and most are done by phone, Skype or email.  Some are in person, such as for television. It’s a situation where you are just having a conversation and it’s your moment to be heard and shine!

10. Think of which of these four approaches you will take in the interview:  entertain, inspire, educate, enlighten. Maybe it’s more than one of those, but as you provide your content it needs to be filtered through a persona.  Context is key. People need to feel you are coming from a certain perspective or vantage point.

11. Think of how you’ll make an impact. Touch them emotionally.  Feed into their desires.  Explore their curiosities. Acknowledge their prejudices. Play into their mindsets. Surprise or challenge them.  Be helpful.  Be funny.  You choose – one way or another, you’ll connect with others in the interview.

12. Determine which message you will share and an action step that you want them to take. Do not blatantly say “buy my book,” but lead them to your site for a free download of something useful.

13. Have six key points to make in every interview – regardless of what they ask you.  Make sure you say the title of your book when answering – and not say: “in my book…”  Offer a give-away that’s on your website. For every point you make, support it with a statistic, example, or short story.  Lastly, mix in your credentials – to justify why they should listen to you.  Don’t read off a resume of jobs and degrees, but preface an answer with something like: “Well, in my two decades of seeing patients as a nutritionist…”  Another time you can say, “Having treated over 1,000 people for obesity…”

14. You want to come across as interesting, resourceful and likeable. Where possible, sprinkle in wit, enthusiasm, and mention things that indicate you are experienced and knowledgeable. Speak with conviction, optimism, and confidence. Believe in yourself and others will believe in what you say.

15. Appeal to their push-buttons, whether it be politics, religion, sex, wealth, health, entertainment, sports, human interest, etc.  Give solutions and identify problems. Be contrarian or confessional.  Issue a wild prediction, shock us, or make a firm demand or accusation.  You can’t be neutral or sit on the sidelines – pick a side or latch onto an extreme.

16. Never answer just yes or no. Aim for a 30-second answer. Speak in soundbites and headlines. Avoid a dull monotone voice. Use catch phrases and buzz words but park the professional jargon.

17. If you don’t know the answer, say so, and move on to what you do know.

18. If you feel cut-off in your answer because they moved to another question, resume your answer and then answer the next question.  You can say: “Great question but I just want to add to your previous question…”

19. Bridge your answers when you get a question you’d rather not answer or focus on.  Grab a word or phrase from the question and use it to answer something they did not ask but seems related.

20. Lastly but most importantly: celebrate your your moment in the spotlight and feel good knowing your voice is being heard.


PLEASE READ!!
2019 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2018 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2017 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2016 Book Marketing & Book Publicity Toolkit

2015 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2014 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2013 Book Marketing & Book PR Toolkit
http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2012/12/book-marketing-book-publicity-tool-kit.html  

Why & How Authors Must Sell Themselves, Not Their Books

How Should Any Author Define True Success?

Do This & Sell More Books. Guaranteed. Any Questions?

The Road Test To Successful Book Promotions

A Self-help Approach To Marketing Your Book Effectively

Top All-Time Posts of Award-Winning Blog: Book Marketing Strategies & Book Publicity Resources

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Sunday, November 17, 2019

The Value Of Printed Books In A Digital World


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The book world is healthy, growing, and as much a part of society as ever before.

That’s my belief -- and the facts bear it out despite misconceptions like “no one reads books anymore,” or “print is dead” or “people listen to podcasts and watch videos but don’t read.”

Books have changed with the times. They can be found in many formats – print, ebook, audiobook. They can be bought anywhere – bookstores, gift shops, big box stores, online, from authors directly, at events.  They are affordable, accessible, and continue to entertain, enlighten, encourage, and inform the masses.

A new book sheds light on the realities, myths, or not-so-well-known factoids about the book today, What We Talk About When We Talk About Books, by Leah Price. The sub-title says it all – The History and Future of Reading. Price, a distinguished professor of English at Rutgers University, founded the Initiative for the Book.

Digital-age pundits act as if the book is fast-becoming an anachronism, to go to the dustbin with typewriters, video cameras, and vinyl records. But the book not only survives – it thrives!

In 2011, more ebooks were sold than hardcovers, but by 2016, hardbacks outstripped ebooks and print sales have risen in each of the past four years.

Price, a book historian, tells us:

  • In 2012, 60% of 6-17 year-olds surveyed, predicted they’d always prefer print to ebooks. By 2016 that number climbed to 65%.
  • “We fetishize books because we imagine that they can protect us from our distractability, our sloth, the weakness of will that the earliest monks called Acedia.”
  • There’s a growing non-profit, Get Into Reading, that “gathers people who are socially marginalized in some way – whether because they’re unemployed, imprisoned, ill, or just old – to listen to each other read poems and short stories aloud.”
  • Better World Books, since 2002, sells used books on Amazon so funds can be raised for literary -- focused non-profits.
  • The Give A Book program in the UK “donates new books to primary school children and kids in foster care, as well as to readers who are ill, imprisoned, or old.”
  • Librotraficante “distributes banned books in low-income communities, creating oases in book deserts.”
Most fascinating in her book was a section on bibliotherapy, a phenomenon taking place in Wales, where doctors are issuing tens of thousands of book prescriptions annually.  “Libraries gained new patrons when doctors send patients through their doors. Literature reaches new readers every time a patient picks up a novel or memoir in route to the circulation desk.”

What an interesting idea. The medicalization of reading seems logical and helpful. Could your local doctor be giving book club recommendations, from novels to self-help books? Why not?!

Studies in Wales show that one-on-one counseling outperforms – narrowly-bibliotherapy. Te book option is inexpensive. And is a great supplement to professional care.

But a century ago, reading books wasn’t always seen as a cure but a problem, especially when it came to young minds and certain books. I’ll leave you with this colorful excerpt from Price’s interesting book:

“If certain genres of book counted as mind-altering substances, why not regulate their sale? Decades before alcohol and tobacco were ruled off-limits to the young, novels were forbidden to under-sixteens.  In 1883, the New York State Legislature debated whether to fine “any person who shall  sell, loan, or give to any minor under sixteen years of age any dime novel or book of fiction, without first obtaining the written consent of the parent or guardian of such a minor.  Unsuccessful in New York, a similar law passed three years later in Massachusetts, forbidding minors from buying “criminal news, police reports, or accounts of criminal deeds, or pictures and stories of lust and crime.”  Teenagers needed to be protected. The 1901 expert who worried that it sapped “the power of concentration, of attention, of memory (for a boy) to mope about the house and to be eternally bending his back and straining his eyes over the printed pages of a book” blamed print for the very vices that reading is now expected to combat A 1916 commentator added that “those     children who prefer to stay at home and read a good book when all the others are out and playing can be suspected of using reading as a sedative.  To childproof your house, the bookcase needed to be locked as firmly as the medicine cabinet.”

Today, on the contrary, the absence of printed stories is seen as a threat.


PLEASE READ!!
Why & How Authors Must Sell Themselves, Not Their Books

How Should Any Author Define True Success?

Do This & Sell More Books. Guaranteed. Any Questions?

The Road Test To Successful Book Promotions

A Self-help Approach To Marketing Your Book Effectively

2019 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2018 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2017 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2016 Book Marketing & Book Publicity Toolkit

2015 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2014 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2013 Book Marketing & Book PR Toolkit

Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Saturday, November 16, 2019

A Book Lover’s Guide To New York

                                            A Booklover's Guide to New York




“New York – the epicenter of belletristic brilliance and cultured abundance.”

This is a sentence in a wonderful treat for those who treasure the greatest city in the world and adore books. It’s called A Book Lover’s Guide to New York, by Cleo Le-Tan. (Rizzoli).

It‘s the kind of book, that looks and feels like a gift, from its jacketless hardcover exterior to its colored paper and artful illustrations mixed in with inviting text about some of the iconic places to experience books in New York.

What the book does is it reminds you of – and opens your eyes to – the great places to enjoy buying or reading books from places like Strand, a century-old store of used and new books that’s bigger than any bookstore I can think of, to Poets House and the NYPL main branch.

It breaks the city and its outer boroughs into neighborhoods and showcases museums, libraries, bookstores, and other related locations.  Interspersed between these descriptive listings are interviews with some literary heavies such as mystery books editor, publisher, and bookstore owner Otto Penzler, Strand owner Nancy Bass, bestselling novelist Richard Price, Founder of MTV Tom Freston, former Vanity Fair Editor-in-Chief Graydon Carter Rizzoli, President Charles Miers, and National Book Award for Fiction winner Sigrid Nunez.

Here are a few excerpts from the book.  I highly recommend you fashion a copy of for yourself  -- read it and use it as a map to where you will go next!

What makes for a good mystery?
“What makes a good mystery is the same as what makes good literature:  poetic writing style, a fascinating character who comes alive on the page, writing that uses language or dialogue that you’ve never heard used to same way before, something original, interesting background, something colorful in the background, something colorful in the background…all the criteria that you would use for literature, you would use for crime fiction.  Except in additions to that, you need to have a serious plot. Often literature is superbly written but not much happens and there is sometimes no real plot.  Good mystery fiction is harder to write than general fiction.”

Book Row
“Circa 1890, the legendary bookseller George D. Smith opened a bookstore on Sixth Avenue, which marked the beginning what would soon become a world-famous territory of six blocks that went by the name of Book Row.  From that period in time up until about the 1960s, almost every shopfront on Fourth Avenue between Union Square and Astor Place – where the famed Astor Library once held court – was a secondhand bookshop.”

The New York Public Library Main Branch
“The atmosphere as you walk in the main doors up the majestic stairs on Fifth Avenue – or even if you decide to enter through the discreet side entrance at 42nd Street – is second to none.  Part intimidating and part expressive, the feeling of these giant palatial museum – like hallways is glorious, lavish, and monumental.  Feel free to step in for a quick wander, a more  in-depth (guided if you wish) tour, or a visit to its numerous and frequent exhibits.  Or if, life me, you are really keen, pick one of the many stately reading rooms to study and mediate in.”

The East Village
“The East Village is synonymous with the Beat Generation, and the streets still reverberate with the names and words of the many authors who stalked them – Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, John Clellon Holmes, and William S. Burroughs, to name just a few.  Decades later, the East Village is still very much a cultural cauldron – and its distinct place in New York’s literary history is forever cemented by acting as a setting for scores of critically acclaimed books from Patti Smith’s Just Kids to Lynne Tillman’s Weird Fucks.  Though very different from what it used to be, it is still a neighborhood full of life, students, bookshops, literary landmarks, and famous authors.”

Bookmarc
“Bookmarc is absolute perfection in terms of finding a gift for anybody you like or love, or treating yourself to something exquisite that you never knew you needed.  Bookmarc is also ideal for discovering hidden treasures – nicer covers than in other shops), or a graphic design book on all the different typefaces in existence, or a unique signed edition of a photography book you’d never seen before, or some really rare imports from Japan or any envogue international destination.  The selection at Bookmarc is somewhere between intellectual, highly fashionable of course), sophisticated, culturally diverse, and really enjoyable.”

92nd Street Y
“Founded almost one and a half centuries ago, the 92nd Street Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association was originally opened as a Jewish community and cultural center. It is mostly known for bringing people together and hosting an excellent series of author events in the fields of literature, art, and education. Today, the 92nd Street Y is a multifaceted cultural institution, which serves people of all races and faiths.  AS one of the city’s most prestigious venues, it offers countless activities in all fields of the arts, and specifically within literary ones.”

Brooklyn Literary History
“Culturally, Brooklyn plays an essential role within New York’s literary scene. Kings County’s literary pedigree is as remarkable and varied as the borough itself, and ranges from historic libraries to brand new bookstore owned by contemporary novelists.  It in fact could warrant its very own booklover’s guide! The very landscape of the place is replete with symbols of its literary past, both as setting for some of the most celebrated novels of the twentieth century and as home and muse to some of America’s greatest writers.  William Styron wrote Sophie’s Choice here; Michael Chabon’s Kavalier and Clay had all sorts of amazing adventures here; Paul Auster’s follies were here; Betty Smith’s tree grew here, in Williamsburg; and Jonathan Lethem built his Fortress of Solitude in Boerum hill.  The railings along the waterfront of Brooklyn Bridge Park are even inscribed with lines from longtime resident Walt Whitman’s poem, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry.”

“With such a storied history, it should come as no surprise that Brooklyn is still home to a lively and engaging literary world, and to some of the city’s finest bookstores.  While Brooklyn itself is roughly world, and to some of the city’s finest bookstores. While Brooklyn itself is roughly twice the size of  Manhattan, a great many of the borough’s most historically important literary destinations are concentrated along what you might call the Brooklyn Riviera, the string of older and more commercial neighborhoods closest to the East River that divides Long Island from Manhattan.  So explore the historic houses of Brooklyn Heights (where Truman Capote and Norman Mailer wrote their masterpieces); roam the hipster haunts of Williamsburg and Bushwick, where independent bookstores perfectly reflect their communities, hear poetry in Prospect Heights or visit the borough’s largest library at Grand Army Plaza; and shop for novels written by your neighbors in Park Slope and Carroll Gardens.”

Rizzoli Bookstore
“Despite how majestic and special Rizzoli might feel, with its high ceilings, its wooden shelves, its marble floors, its intricate Fornasetti murals, and its thoughtfully laid-out book displays, there is also a very cozy and intimate feeling to the store. All the way in the back, there is a wonderful room – reminiscent of the big ballroom my grandparents never had, where I would have fantasized of secretly playing hide and seek, or of a games room with a beautiful billiards table and comfy armchairs to fall asleep in – which accommodates more ponderous shoppers by day and signings, launches, and other events by night. Yet again, despite all of its grandness and majesty, that room, along with the rest of the bookshop, has something intrinsically warm and comforting about it – perhaps because of the amalgamation of all the inviting piles and shelves of books on art, architecture, photography, cooking, and fashion that surround you.”

How do you envision the future of bookshops?
“For right now it seems pretty healthy – there seems to be more and more interest in publishing and books. Don’t get me wrong nobody’s going to get rich running a bookstore, but it’s definitely rewarding.  I based my initial interest in bookstores on a Japanese model after a trip there about fifteen years ago.  There were a few bookstores that  carried unusual, beautifully crafted books from small publishers all over the world.  The model for publishing came from the Koln-based bookstore Walther Koenig that began collaborating in the 1980s with artists like Hans-Peter Feldmann, Gerhard Richter, Boris Mikhailov, and Wolfgang Tillmans.  I think keeping things in-house, produced on a small-scale to control the quality, is where it’s at, and using the internet for this kind of product can be really useful-using the bookstore as a showroom.”  


PLEASE READ!!

Why & How Authors Must Sell Themselves, Not Their Books
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/authors-must-sell-themselves-not-their.html

How Should Any Author Define True Success?
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/how-should-authors-define-success.html

Do This & Sell More Books. Guaranteed. Any Questions?
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/do-this-to-sell-more-books-any-questions.html

The Road Test To Successful Book Promotions
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-road-test-to-successful-book.html

A Self-help Approach To Marketing Your Book Effectively
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/a-self-help-approach-to-book-marketing.html

2019 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2018 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2017 Book PR & Marketing Toolkit

2016 Book Marketing & Book Publicity Toolkit

2015 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2014 Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

2013 Book Marketing & Book PR Toolkit


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.

Friday, November 15, 2019

How Authors Can Blog To Success


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Authors of books are writers, yet when it comes to using their best asset and No. 1 weapon – their ability to write and communicate powerfully - they often miss the boat. Plenty of authors do not blog well, often, or at all. That has to change if they want to push their brand and sell books.

Blogging can be work. It can also be fun. The key is to find a happy medium.

First, establish a blog.  Go onto WordPress or Blogger or some other blog platform and get started. Fill out a profile, create an account, and title your blog. Use your name as the title or something that represents what you plan to write about, the way you’d title a book.

Next, write out a brief game plan or mission statement for what you want the blog to be. What will you cover, how will you approach it, and why should people read it? Answer those questions.  Map out how often you will post it. Develop a format or a look that you plan to stick with.

Start to draft future posts. Store up a few posts so that when you are busy, tired, sick, stressed or brain dead, you can have something to post.  Though length from post to post can vary wildly, from say 500 words to 1200 words – or more or less – try to have a consistent range.

Research bloggers who cover your topic. What can you learn from them? What should you seek to duplicate or enhance? Will they help you keep informed?

Respond to comments on your blog – or don’t. Again, decide now and then be consistent.

Have a tagline – either on top that represents your persona and writings or end every post with it.

Don’t put out a post unless you know it’s factual, true to your values, and helpful to what you seek to accomplish.  To just dump content you don’t like or believe in is a waste of everyone’s time. Write well, be concise, and add something to the loud dialogue out there.

Think about the types of content you might have. For instance:

·         Interviews.
·         Product reviews.
·         Guest posts.
·         Opinion pieces.
·         How-to pieces.
·         Inspiring stories.
·         Newsy things.
·         Statistical analysis.

The best source for content?  Your book, the people you know, the news you read, and your own experiences.  Bottom line?  Post relevant content that your readers want or need.

Title each post carefully. Do you want to be specific or general? For instance, this post is called "How Authors Can blog to Success.”  My target audience is authors so I included them.  I put  "success” as a qualifier as opposed to just saying how authors can blog. .

Have posts include sub-headings to break up chunks of text. You format should, at times, include images, bullet points, a readable font, use small paragraphs, and be original.  It should look and sound right.

While you deliver quality content, use key words naturally (helps with SEO), and link back to prior posts or your website. Always mention your book at the bottom of the blog with an “about you” paragraph.

It’s not all about you or your book. Write about other people, events, or books – but try to bring it back to you.

The blog will be successful if it helps you meet goals in branding, book sales, sharing a great message, etc.  To make it a success write consistently, pour your passion into it, and promote your blog like a book, via social media. 

Your blog is a tool – a means to an end – but it is also its own thing. The blog is something you can enjoy and be proud of. 

I should know – I started my blog 8 ½ years ago and I’m about to crack two million clicks on it. I’m so happy it is reaching people like you and helping them. That’s a wonderful reward!


PLEASE READ!!
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Is This A Real Online Strategy To Successfully Sell Your Books?
https://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/a-real-online-strategy-to-sell-books.html

Why & How Authors Must Sell Themselves, Not Their Books

How Should Any Author Define True Success?

Do This & Sell More Books. Guaranteed. Any Questions?


Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog ©2019. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America.