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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Book Business: Publishing Past, Present and Future



I came across a book that was published in 2000: Book Business: Publishing Past, Present and Future. The author, Jason Epstein, was the right person to pen it nearly two decades ago.

The book offers insights as to how book publishing functioned, dating back to when the author broke in during the 1950s and even references how things were back in the 1920s. To now read a book nearly 20 years after it was written, one that tried to predict where book publishing was heading, is a very interesting exercise.

This book is an expanded version of three lectures that he had delivered in October 1999 at the New York Public Library, sponsored by the Center for Scholarship Writers.

Here are some selected excerpts from the book – I think you will find them revealing:

Movable Type to Electronic Books
1.      In the past dozen years movable type has been replaced by technologies that were unimaginable when I entered the book business in the 1950s.  Like the technologies of oral and written language and of movable type, these electronic technologies will radically change the way information is transmitted, stories are read, and cultures are formed.  Book publishing in the next ten or twenty years will be very different from the quaint trade that I entered fifty years ago.

Print on Demand Books
2.      Books as physical objects will not pass away to be replaced by electronic signals reader from glowing, hand-held screens. Nor will bookstores vanish.  But they will coexist hereafter with a vast multilingual directory of digitized texts, assembled from a multitude of sources, perhaps “tagged” for easy reference, and distributed electronically.  From this directory readers at their home computers may transfer the materials they select to machines capable of printing and binding single copies no demand at innumerable remote sites and perhaps eventually within their own homes.

A Concentration of Best-Selling Author Dominance
3.      Between 1986 and 1996 the share of all books sold represented by the thirty top best-sellers nearly doubled as retail concentration increased.  But within roughly the same period, sixty-three of the one hundred bestselling titles were written by a mere six writers, Tom Clancy, John Grisham, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Michael Crichton, and Danielle Steel – a much greater concentration than in the past and a mixed blessing to publishers, who sacrifice much of their normal profit, and often incur losses, to keep powerful authors like these.

Retail Booksellers in a Digital World
4.      It is less clear how new technologies will transform retail bookselling as the chains in their over-saturated marketplace face competition from Internet booksellers and the prospect of limitless virtual inventories available on demand in electronic or printed form at random locations.  These factors have already discouraged investment in the retail chains, whose share prices have stagnated at low levels.  Nonetheless, a civilization without retail booksellers is unimaginable.  Like shrines and other sacred meeting places, bookstores are essential artifacts of human nature.  The feel of a book taken from the shelf and held in the hand is a magical experience, linking writer to reader.  But to compete with the World Wide Web, bookstores of the future will be different from the mass-oriented superstores that now dominate the retail marketplace.  Tomorrow’s stores will have to be what the Web cannot be:  tangible, intimate, and local communal shrines, perhaps with coffee bars offering pleasure and wisdom in the company of others who share one’s interests, where the book one wants can always be found and surprises and temptations spring from every shelf.

A New Literary Culture
5.      In the technological future, readership of such books will expand as authors, with the help of editors and publicists, and no longer constrained by the turnover requirements of a physical marketplace, present their work directly to readers over the World Wide Web, where word of mouth is instantaneous, credible, and widespread.  Publishers had welcomed television as a powerful tool to promote their titles to the mass market created by the malls.  But television is a one-way medium addressed to an undifferentiated audience to which access is at the discretion of the broadcaster.  The Internet, by connecting readers and writers one on one, offers the possibility of almost limitless choice and foreshadows a literary culture thrilling if also alarming in its potential diversity.

A Consortium Sales Solution
6.      If publishers formed a consortium to sell their books directly to readers over the Internet, the logic of Internet marketing, to which middlemen are extraneous, would be acknowledged and the problem of insufficient margin would be overcome.  What I had in mind was a consortium open to all publishers, old and new, large and small, on equal terms.  This consortium would create a combined annotated catalog of all its titles and maintain warehouses where books from diverse publishers would be packed and shipped directly to Internet buyers.  The elimination of wholesalers and retailers would permit the consortium’s component publishers to reduce prices to consumers, pay higher royalties to writers, and increase their own margins.  To the extent that books are sold by the consortium directly to consumers, the problem of returns from overstocked retailers would also be eliminated.

The concept of such a consortium was simple.  To implement it proved impossible.  Though the Internet made such a consortium sooner or later inevitable, the conglomerate managers to whom I presented the idea were not enthusiastic, nor was Jeff Bezos when I suggested to him that a solution to his problem of insufficient margin might be to convert Amazon from a retailer to a brokerage, transmitting orders for a fee to a publishers’ consortium, if one could be arranged.

The Future
7.      My guess is that future publishing units will be small, though they may be related to a central financial source.  To the extent that writers deliver the contents of their minds directly to the minds of their readers over the Web, as Stephen King has done, such vestigial publishing work as marketing, sales, shipping, and warehousing together with their bureaucracies and inefficiencies can be minimized and assigned to specialist firms.  Book publishing may therefore become once more a cottage industry of diverse, creative autonomous units, or so there is now reason to believe.

According to the book’s flaps, here is what you need to know about the author:

“Jason Epstein has led arguably the most creative career in book publishing during the past half-century.  In 1952, while a young editor at Doubleday, he created Anchor Books, which launched the so-called quality paperback revolution and established the trade paperback format.  In the following decade he became cofounder of The New York Review of Books.  In the 1980s he created the Library of America, the prestigious publisher of American classics and The Reader’s Catalog, the precursor of online bookselling…


“For many years, Jason Epstein was editorial director of Random House. He was the first recipient of the National Book Award for Distinguished Service to American Letters and was given the Curtis Benjamin Award by the Association of American Publishers for “inventing new kinds of publishing and editing.”  He has edited many well-known novelists, including Norman Mailer, Vladimir Nabokov, E.L. Doctorow, Philip Roth, and Gore Vidal, as well as many important writers of nonfiction.”

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource."

Monday, February 19, 2018

The World Almanac Turns 150!



The World Almanac and Book of Facts: 2018 celebrates 150 years of informing us of all kinds of things, including statistics, facts, and history as it relates to sports, politics, culture, entertainment, science, arts, and other areas.  Every year since I was a boy I’d get the new edition to read up on things.

A number of items covered relate directly to books, including stats on libraries (p. 248), most challenged books in libraries (p. 249), best-selling books (p. 250), best-selling books (p. 250), winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature (p. 261), Pulitzer Prize winners for Fiction (p. 263), new words in English (p. 208), writers of the past (p. 209), Poets Laureate (p. 214), and foreign words and phrases (p. 709).

The World Almanac claims it is the best-selling U.S. reference book of all time with more than 82 million copies sold since 1868.  It actually disappeared for a decade, from 1876-1885, when the newspaper that published it, The New York World, folded.  In 1886, famed newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer revived The World Almanac and has published it annually ever since.

So what happened of interest back in 1868, the year of the inaugural edition?  It was a time of rebuilding a tattered post-Civil War America -- and it was a year before professional baseball leagues would be formed.

In literature, Willkie Collins published what is considered to be the first full-length detective novel in English, The Moonstone.  Also penned that year was Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, and Horatio  Alger’s Ragged Dick.

A century ago, in 1918, some of the headline stories included:

·         Influenza pandemic begins, killing up to 100 million worldwide, of which some 650,000 die in the U.S.
·         World War I concludes.
·         The Sedition Act is signed into law, forbidding “disloyal, profane, scurrilous or abusive” speech about the U.S. government or its military.

Just 50 years ago, in 1968, some big books were published, including:

·         The Double Helix by James D. Watson.
·         The Population Bomb by Paul Ehlrlich
·         Couples by John Updike
·         Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut
·         The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

Lastly, I leave with some predictions of the future that were made in the past.  In 1968, to celebrate the book’s 100-year mark, Professor Isaac Asimov made a number of predictions for 2068.  We’re now within 50 years of those bold insights.  Here are some things that he said:

"Food will become the product of gigantic laboratories and the percentage of space on land and sea which must be devoted to food will be decreasing in 2068.  More and more of the Earth’s surface can be turned into amusement resorts, parkland, and wildlife refuges.

"With the declining birth rate, the rise in ectogenesis (the development of fetuses outside the human body) the disappearance of routine housework, and the conversion of all work into low-muscle, high-brain endeavor that can be performed by either sex, it is clear that the woman of 2068 will be completely equal to the man economically and socially…Sexual associations will be looser in 2068 and more casual."


SAVE THE ARTS!
“To have a National Endowment for the Arts is to sanction creativity to provide space to support the poetic and to give meaning to struggle, hope and life.  Whether it’s transcribing Great Negro Spirituals, protecting indigenous Native languages, attending outdoor jazz concerts, preserving quilting b the Amish and the Gee’s Bend women, singing the Delta blues, weaving narratives of neglected LGBTQ history, creating plays of the immigrant experience or collaborating across state lines, we are a country of expression.  Art is the bridge when walls of fear keep us insulated and reactive.  A society loses meaning, purpose and direction without it.”

--Karen Finley, Time Magazine


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Here are best author-publisher-publishing pro interviews of 2017

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

The Allure of Books About Books



Books about books.

This is my favorite kind of book.  I love books that talk about other books, publishing, writing, literacy, free speech, authors, book history, bookstores, language and all things bibliophile.  My never-ending fascination with such books is embraced by a minority of people, but it’s a sizeable group.

You know the kind of people that like such books.  They are wordsmiths, maybe writers, professors, educators, or historians.  They love the smell of books and engage their senses to consume books that touch upon history, communication and creativity.

There are even lists devoted to identifying such books. Many stores have sections dedicated to them.

Here is a sample of books that talk about books or have a central theme built around books:

·         Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops
·         The Man Who Loved Books Too Much
·         Book List:  Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason
·         So Many Books, So Little Time:  A Year of Passionate Reading
·         The Jane Austen Book Club
·         A Novel Bookstore
·         The Bestseller
·         How Reading Changed My Life
·         The Book Thief
·         The Bookstore
·         The Case of the Missing Books
·         Fahrenheit 451
·         Matilda
·         Bibliotopia
·         Book:  A Memoir
·         The Bookshop Book
·         1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
·         A History of Reading
·         How to Read a Book
·         When Books Went to War:  The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II
·         The World Between Two Covers: Reading the Globe
·         The Year of Reading Dangerously:  How Fifty Great Books (and Two Not-So-Great Ones) Saved My Life
·         The Novel Cure:  From Abandonment to Zestlessness:  751 Books to Cure What Ails You
·         The Pleasure of Reading:  43 Writers on the Discovery of Reading and the Books that Inspired Them
·         Book Crush:  For Kids and Teens – Recommended Reading for Every Mood Moment and Interest
·         The Book of Lost Books:  An Incomplete History of All the Great Books You’ll Never Read

Are you book curious?  Do you find yourself more fascinated with a book about some aspect of books than by some ordinary books?  We are so inquisitive about writers and their creative powers, their checkered pasts, and their struggles to influence others.  We want to be taken behind the scenes of the publishing industry and into the lives of those who impact it – from editors, literary agents, book critics, and press agents to those influenced by books – society and its institutions. 

If you read any book this year, read one about books!


Selected Excerpts From Trivium: The Classical Liberal Arts of Grammar, Logic & Rhetoric (Bloomsbury)

Scripts
“The word ‘grammar’ comes from the Greek term gramma (a letter), itself related to grapho (to draw or write).  The invention of script, around 3000 BC in Sumeria and India, suddenly made it possible to write and read texts of law, commerce, ritual, poetry, history, philosophy, and science.  And, perhaps most important of all, it gave birth to the detailed discussion of the correct form of such texts.

“Broadly speaking, scripts come in two types.  Logographic systems try to depict the meaning of a text without relating to the sound of language (the Chinese script being a prime example).  Phonographic systems, on the other hand, record text as it would sound when spoken.  The Roman alphabet, which we use to write English and other Western European tongues, is phonographic, as are the scripts used for Hebrew, Russian, Greek, Arabic, and Sanskrit.  Today’s International Phonetic Alphabet is used for correctly writing the pronunciation of languages.”


Language
“Every natural language uses a distinct set of sounds as building blocks, these generally being classified as either consonants or vowels.  Distinguishing how and with which parts of our speech organs these sounds are formed can be of great help in the acquisition of a language.  The science of sounds in speech and language is called phonetics.

“Language is humanity’s primary vehicle for though and communication, both internal and external.  Indeed, the ability to learn the complex system of symbols and rules which underlie syntax and grammar is arguably the most distinctive feature of the human race.  Grammar enables us to inform, edify, and entertain; it allows us to reason, debate, and argue; it helps us study, build, and use complex things, from recipes to spaceships.

“One of the earliest written languages for which governing rules were established is Indian Sanskrit.


“Broadly speaking, older languages have more complex systems of inflection, while the grammar of younger languages is more simplified.  Immigration, trade, invasions, and occupations may have forced villagers to learn more languages over time, and, rather than mastering the intricacies of any particular tongue, they muddled along with a simplified speech which later became the rule.  Perhaps the finest example of such a process and its result is English.”

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource."

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Interview with author Eleanor L. Tomczyk


The Fetus Chronicles: Podcasts from My Miseducated Self” (A mostly true memoir)
Eleanor Tomczyk is a memoirist and humorist blogger whose work features the musings of an engagingly funny ex-Evangelical Conservative Christian, African-American Baby Boomer.  Not many authors can begin a book with words such as “I was born in a toilet,” literally mean it, and live to tell about it with such grace and humor.  At the age of 60, the wife, mother, singer, actress, motivational speaker, and award-winning voice-over artist set out to establish a new career in retirement as a storyteller, using her life as fodder.  Currently in her late 60s, the mother, grandmother, and wife of 38 years has published three books:  Monsters' Throwdown (2013), Fleeing Oz (2015), and The Fetus Chronicles: Podcasts from My Miseducated Self (2017).  She also posts a humorous weekly blog: How the Hell Did I End Up Here? Website:  www.eleanortomczyk.com

1. What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book?
Growing old—that is what prompted The Fetus Chronicles, which is the third book of a trilogy about my life.  Before I wrote TFC, I saw a picture of myself stuck on a zip line 200 feet above a rain forest, twirling around in the air like a random leaf stuck in an errant cobweb string.  I couldn’t move forward and I couldn’t move backwards.  In my panic, all I could think about was the Internet meme that was going to headline that picture being uploaded by all the cameras taking pictures of my misfortune:  “Old Fat Black Woman Didn’t Get the Message to ‘Stay Home’!” For years that photo mortified me until one day I looked at it again and decided “this shit is funny as all get out!”  I soon realized that I had scores of stories about my life (some horrific, some extremely sad, but many that were hilarious because they were so embarrassing) that dealt with universal fears from which I had gained deep insights that might be worth sharing.

2. What is it about and whom do you believe is your targeted reader?
My target audience is Baby Boomer women of all ethnicities, races, and religions, and the men who love them (although the men may need a hazmat suit).  As an African-American woman who grew up in the ghetto of Cleveland, Ohio, got carried on the wings of the Civil Rights Act into higher education and freedom, and almost squandered that gift of intellectualism and freedom in White, Evangelical, Right-wing churches for 30 plus years, I felt that I had a lot to say as a woman about the universal missteps of life and the issues we face just by being born a woman, as well as the grace needed to overcome those situations.  I wanted to leave the next generation of women a bird’s eye view of what it means to try and let go of shame (“My rape and sexual abuse does not own or define me”), laugh at ourselves (“Embarrassment won’t kill me even if it seems the entire world is watching”), and shake off all those things that try to thwart women from evolving (“You can’t because…”). 

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book? What should remain with them long after putting it down?
Everybody hurts…everybody suffers…nobody is perfect.  At the risk of going all Oprah on you, what I hope would remain with readers is the strong incentive to try and become their “best selves”—to exit the stage left of life living their most authentic selves. Do what you want.  Go where you will.  Say what you mean—regardless of what others think.  If it’s your truth—live it!

4. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers?
If you want to write—just do it!  Don’t wait for someone else’s permission.  I had 235 rejections from literary agents for my first memoir Monsters’ Throwdown, and I realized (after reading that 16-year-old Justin Bieber got a book deal for his memoir) that I’d be dead for a hundred years before anyone gave me the green light to write, simply because I didn’t bring to the table a platform of several million followers on social media. I knew I had something to say, and nobody had the right to tell me I couldn’t say it.

5. What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?
Where the book publishing industry is headed is already here and it is fast becoming the trend:  independent book publishing and author-generated promotions.  The five major publishing houses don’t have the inclination nor the desire to “waste their time” or budgets on writers who don’t bring them a built-in audience who will bring the publishers immediate guaranteed sales.  Thus the book deal for the memoir of a 16 year old who was still wet behind the ears as opposed to someone who brought gravitas but no hysterical teenage fan base to the table.  Even if an unknown author is “lucky” enough to garner a book deal, there are no glory days of book advances anymore, no sitting back while publishing houses create publicity for the unknown writer, and most times, once the publishing house is paid, the author rarely sees a cent—not to mention that the final result of the product may not be what the writer intended.  At least when an author independently publishes, he or she has total control over the work and stands to receive a good portion of the returns to invest in future books and promotions.  If writers have to do all the leg work, why pay a middle man?

6. What great challenges did you have in writing your book?
My idol is Maya Angelou, and she once said: “There are teachers who write and writers who teach.”  I am a teacher who writes.  I am always trying to point the reader to hope, truth, light, grace, and mercy through my life stories.  My challenge is to do so without preaching.

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?
My book (actually all three of my books) is made for such a time as this.  We (especially women) are really hurting as a culture and as a nation.  I personally think that our hope is not in a leader or a political party but in ourselves portraying authentic lives filled with truth, love, forgiveness, mercy, and grace that we want to see played out in our relationships, communities, government, religious centers, and activism.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource."

Interview with author Mike Nemeth




128 Billion to 1: Ten Steps to Beat the Odds and Win Your NCAA Tourney Office Pool

Mike Nemeth is a novelist, blogger, former AAU basketball coach and former Information Technology executive. He is also a fan of NCAA basketball, and his passion inspired him to write his new book, 128 Billion to 1. Nemeth is known for his crime thriller, Defiled, which became a bestselling book on Amazon. Mike now lives in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia, where he enjoys spending time with his wife, Angie, and their rescue dog, Sophie. Please see:  https://nemosnumbers.com

1.      What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book?
In 2003 I watched my under-respected alma mater, the University of Wisconsin, defeat a team the experts considered far superior to win the Big Ten championship. None of the experts on TV could explain the outcome using traditional statistics and inside-the-box thinking. Intrigued, I did a forensic study of the game and discovered that traditional statistics and inside-the-box thinking misrepresent hundreds of games and dozens of teams every season! As a hobby I collected statistics and tracked the experts’ erroneous predictions for thirteen years and eventually realized that the game simply needed a new set of statistics to properly explain outcomes and accurately rank teams relative to one another. The ah ha moment led to the realization that diehard basketball fans don’t make poor guesses when filling their March Madness brackets; they make poorly informed guesses. I believe all fans should know how and why they go wrong.

2.      What is it about and who is your targeted reader?
The book is about two concepts that travel hand-in-hand. The first is that a correct set of statistics better explains the game and better reveals the relative strength in the tournament field. The second is that the tournament is not designed to reveal the best team in the country; it is designed to produce chaos and reward a fortunate survivor with the trophy. When fans take these two facts into consideration they will improve their chances of winning their office pool. My target reader is anyone who fills a March madness bracket.

3.      What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book? What should remain with them long after putting it down?
Beyond its relevance to basketball, I hope the book makes readers aware that over one hundred years of conventional thinking can easily be overthrown by a little critical investigation and simple logic. If true in basketball, where else might that be true?

4.      What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers?
Writing is easiest, most rewarding, most beneficial, when the author is making the reader aware of a truth or an injustice or a social problem. Writing with a purpose should be the goal of all writers. So, pick a cause and write about it. That’s when we’re meaningful to society.

5.      What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?
The obvious trend is toward an oversupplied marketplace with too many books, too few readers, too little time and not enough profits. Most of us write because we are compelled by some invisible force to do so, but most of us would also hope that someone other than our moms would read what we write. I also see a resurgence of independent booksellers who provide access to more diverse titles than do the major chain stores.

6.      What great challenges did you have in writing your book?
The biggest challenge was to find a medium and format that suited the material. An explanation of the new statistics was first published as an article in the New York Times in 2011 under the title The Missing Ingredient but the article length could not do the whole story justice. On the other hand, the full story, now published as 128 Billion to 1, was too short to qualify as a trade paperback. Luckily, Morgan James Publishing has introduced a Minibuk format, a paperback of around one hundred pages that can readily be displayed at checkout counters. Voila! 128 Billion to 1 had a path to market.

7.      If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?
128 Billion to 1 is short, fun to read, relatively less expensive than other books, and is timely. The official release date is December 12, 2017 which means it can be read before March Madness brackets have to be filled. It also makes a great Holiday present for that person who already has everything else.

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Study this exclusive author media training video from T J Walker



Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource."