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Monday, October 22, 2018

Interview with author Lucinda Bakken White




Confessions of a Bone Woman: Realizing Authentic Wildness in a Civilized World

1. What really inspired you to write your book, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a book?

Like so many others, I was shaped to fit into a cultural mainstream mold, and I wanted to share my personal journey of reclaiming my inner wildness, which allowed me to become my own authority and live a fulfilled life. It’s my hope that my story of personal transformation will help others quicken their process of self-discovery and healing.

2. What is it about and whom do you believe is your targeted reader?

The book takes readers on a journey through my own process of realizing authentic wildness in a civilized world. I had a very successful mainstream lifestyle, as a corporate executive married to a Silicon Valley CEO with all of the lavish clothes, parties, and social events that come with that world. But it wasn't fulfilling. At a certain point I went inward and listened to my inner ache. It was a harrowing process, but I eventually figured out how to reclaim my genuine self and higher life purpose. I did have midlife women in mind when I wrote my memoir, but my story speaks to many people, whatever one's age or lifestyle. 

3. What do you hope will be the everlasting thoughts for readers who finish your book? What should remain with them long after putting it down?

It can feel so lonely to live a life that's not on track with your authentic self. My hope is that readers will slay their loneliness by observing and adopting the methods I used to create deep connections, heal from the inside out and realize authentic wildness. Long after they put my book down, readers will be inspired to connect with the wisdom of Nature and their own inner voice, recognizing how much these two things go hand-in-hand.

4. What advice or words of wisdom do you have for fellow writers?

Never give up. Your story needs to be told, if not for others at least for yourself. The process of writing and expressing your truth is powerful, transformative and healing.

5. What trends in the book world do you see and where do you think the book publishing industry is heading?

The book publishing industry has been undergoing big changes. More people are utilizing self-publishing methods to get their messages and stories out there. People are reading books in electronic form, or having the book read to them through audio books, and I think we will continue to see increases in these numbers.

6. What great challenges did you have in writing your book?

I come from a highly productive, overachieving, mainstream family and community who thought I should be able to finish my book quickly. As a result, it was a challenge to carve out time and space to write my memoir. For two and a half years I said, "no, thank you" to many invitations and expectations. Most of all, I had to endure with the inner knowing and confidence that what I was doing was important. 

7. If people can only buy one book this month, why should it be yours?

Confessions of a Bone Woman will pull you deeply into my heart and soul and take you on a heroine’s journey that will most likely inspire big transformations in your own life.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America and participated in a PR panel at the Sarah Lawrence College Writers Institute Conference.

How Are Smart Book Marketing Decisions Made?




Many people talk about making good choices and wise decisions, whether it's in one’s personal life or professional one. Many books are written about singular political decisions or how business leaders go about making tough choices.  But does anyone really chat about how to make savvy book marketing decisions?

If you believe book marketing is an important and necessary component for authors to succeed – by any measure – book sales, branding, sharing an empowering message – then you would agree, authors, publishers, and promoters need an effective process or system by which to make their decisions.  So how does one go about choosing what to spend time, resources, brain power, and energy on?

First, in order to make any decisions, you must set goals.  Know what you want to achieve and then identify the types of decisions you’ll need to make.

Second, set priorities. Not all decisions lead to equal results or ramifications.  Identify what’s most important to you and allow your decisions to be guided by this list.

Third, be informed and research all issues thoroughly.  You can’t make a good choice unless you have complete, current and relevant information.

Fourth, consult with others you respect, admire or who have related experiences to what you are weighing a decision on.

Fifth, choose to act not out of desperation or fear but of conviction, courage, and faith.  Believe in yourself, but don’t overstate your value either.

Sixth, where possible, test your choices or experiment in a way where you take only a small risk to see if something that you want to do will actually work.

Seventh, be realistic but stay optimistic.  Good decisions come when you blend cold facts with reasonable possibilities.  Decisions can’t be made based on dreams, but it is fine to follow your passion provided you work hard and smart every step of the way of your pursuits.

Eighth, look for models or past evidence of success from others who confronted the same predicaments you find yourself in.

Ninth, assess your resources. How much money, time and how many connections do you have that can help you support your final decision?

Lastly, find a way to measure and evaluate your marketing decisions – and learn from them.

Many book marketing decisions are made where one or more of these steps is ignored or missed.  We can be ignorant, impulsive, or egotistical to the point it blinds us from making good choices.  Sometimes we are too conservative and slowed down by a desire to not get something wrong, leaving us stifled and stalled.  Other times we make decisions with incomplete information, acting under a misunderstanding of the facts, or an unwillingness to seek out help.

Book marketing decisions usually involve things that we fall short of (money), misallocate (time), or fail to know or understand (information).  Too many people operate under myths, prejudices, or lies – and it destroys their ability to properly market a brand and promote a book.

Your book marketing should be done without regrets or pestering concerns that you’re not doing all that you should be doing.  Take this beast by the horns and conquer the book marketing monster by building up the hero within yourself.

Knowledge is power.
Friends who can help are power.
Silencing fears with action is power.

You can make great book marketing decisions once you permit yourself to fail.  Instead of fighting failure only focus on one thing: success.  Do what it takes to succeed and ignore any failures along the way.

Please feel free to join me on LinkedIn --https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum/.

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America and participated in a PR panel at the Sarah Lawrence College Writers Institute Conference.

Sunday, October 21, 2018

The David vs. Goliath Author Battle Is Won With Book Publicity



Everyone tries to get into everyone’s business.  There are just a handful of companies that seek to dominate every aspect of commerce – or at least influence it.  Even giants like Sears can’t survive against behemoths Amazon, Target, and Wal-Mart.  Google, Facebook, Twitter run the online information infrastructure. What’s left for the other companies and small businesses that may have specialization, personalization, and even local roots on their side – but who can’t compete on price, speed of delivery, or reputation?

Authors should learn from the bigger world around them. Just as they compete with each other for book sales, authors also compete with other content providers, available for a free or fee, and they have to do battle against giants like best-selling authors or the Big 5 in publishing.  Even when an author has a great book – maybe even at a great price – how will he or she generate sales when no one knows his book even exists?

The lone differentiator is publicity.

Yes, that thing that’s misunderstood, feared, and loathed by most authors.

But a well-executed, creative and persistent book publicity campaign can be the difference between irrelevance and success.  Book publicity is an important cog in the writing machine that no author can afford to ignore.

Now I get it, the economics don’t always pay off for authors, even when they participate in a book publicity campaign. But there are many long-term benefits to doing a PR campaign that go beyond the short-term sales boost.

I know you are probably saying:  “Now why would I invest money, time, and effort into something that may not pay for itself in book sales?”

Here’s why you do publicity:

·         It can help with sales
·         It builds your profile up so that down the road you can advance your career, get a book deal, or secure speaking gigs.
·         It provides a forum for you to get an empowering message out, one that may help others.
·         It can raise interest for your book and possibly lead to rights sales – foreign, film, audio etc.
·         It supports your ideas and writings.

But make no mistake.  To do a proper book publicity campaign means you’ll have to put more into it than you may initially feel you will get out of it. There’s a risk that little will come of it.  But it’s worth it and it’s the only way to make a go at a strong writing career.

A book cannot survive on its own.  It’ll require food, clothing, shelter and nurturing.  Book PR is our lone weapon against the stats quo out there.

Please feel free to join me on LinkedIn --https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum/.


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Why authors need coaches, just like athletes

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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America and participated in a PR panel at the Sarah Lawrence College Writers Institute Conference.

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Can Books Keep Up With An Ever-Changing English Language?



In 1828 the Webster dictionary was born.  It wasn’t updated until a century later, in 1934, and then a third edition popped up in 1961, causing controversy that’s still debated today and is the focus of an interesting 2012 book, The Story of Ain’t:  America, Its language, and the Most Controversial Dictionary Ever Published, by David Skinner (Harper).

One of the many changes to the dictionary in 1961 was the surprise inclusion of “ain’t.”  The book notes:

“Newspapers lunged at the story of the dictionary’s shockingly liberal treatment of ain’t.  In Chicago, the Tribune and the Sun-Times picked up the same newswire item, announcing, “The word ‘ain’t’ ain’t a grammatical mistake anymore.”  The next day, the Toronto Globe and Mail weighed in.

“A dictionary’s embrace of the word ain’t will comfort the ignorant, confer approval upon the mediocre, and subtly imply that proper English is the tool only of the snob.”  But this was something more than your typical lecture from the union of concerned citizens.

"We live in a world of problems, the newspaper explained, problems that arise from misunderstandings between individuals and even nations.  “Where language is without rules and discipline, there is little understanding, much misunderstanding.  How can we convey precise meanings to the Russians, when we cannot convey them to each other?”

Certainly, a lot changed in the quarter century between editions.  Skinner notes:

“There was the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II, all of which left their historical fingerprints on the fast-expanding lexicon.  Movies, radio, and television came to the fore, contributing not only new forms of entertainment but new words to describe them.  The role of women changed, the baby boom started, the Kinsey reports were published, rock ‘n’ roll was invented.  Cars and roads multiplied.  The civil rights movement began.

"The idea of America changed.  American culture became “popular,” and serious culture was popularized.  The language of Americans went from being a source of modesty to a source of pride, and mined for literary and scholarly purposes.  More Americans became more educated and spoke and wrote like educated people speak and write.  Feelings about proper usage changed."

There’s been a long-running debate about dictionaries -- are they to reflect how language is used or to enforce rules that no longer seem to be followed?  Who dictates which changes to impose upon others?  Even the different dictionary-making companies will disagree on the words and rules to include or remove over time.

Shouldn’t a dictionary unify us and agree on a standard for all to attain?  If not, we are left with a system that, without exact rules, will fall apart and lead to misunderstandings and eventually an inability for anyone to understand another.  We will allow language to fall apart and become a puzzle of jumbled images left to wide interpretation and abuse.

“Language is the expression of ideas,” wrote Webster in 1828, "and if the people of one country cannot retain an identity of ideas, they cannot retain an identity of language.”

Are we already amidst an era of disunity when it comes to proper usage of words in America?  Think about the numerous threats, challenges, and influences on our words and how we communicate with each other.  Here are some to think about:

Spanglish:  As America sees the number of Hispanics rise – now over 60 million – we see an increase in the breakdown of English.

Ebonics:  As America sees the number of African Americans rise- now over 40 million – we see an infusion of new speech patterns and phrases entering the masses by way of pop culture.

Emojis:  Non-words are taking over online communication.

Texting/Emailing:  We see a decrease in word-selection, punctuation, capitalization, proper syntax and the observance of the very rules that used to dictate our communications.

Technology: New terms come out of new inventions at a record pace.

Social Media:  New terms are born daily out of the billions of global postings.

At some point, probably within the next decade, we will see the creation of a new dictionary that radically alters the language.  Not only will it reflect current usage and mass abuse – it will seek to establish and legitimize these changes as a new standard. But such attempts to standardize a constantly evolving and shifting target will prove to be impossible.  English will likely see a change unseen in centuries, similar to how few people understand or value old, Shakespearean English today.

The English of 2028, on the 200th anniversary of Webster’s radical dictionary publication, will be one that is somewhat unrecognizable to anyone who lived before the 21st century (which is only 18 years ago!).

Authors are starting to write books that not only are written in a language and style unfamiliar to the reader of the 20th century, they are potentially writing for a shorter legacy than other writers had enjoyed.  Will someone in 2068 even understand a book from 2018?

Or, is all of this discussion blown out of proportion?  We know language, mores, politics, inventions, ideas, and science have always evolved over time and each has even undergone a revolution -- or several, but one has to wonder if our world of global sharing around the clock is also hurting our ability to understand, appreciate, and value this voluminous amount of communicating.

Please feel free to join me on LinkedIn --https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum/.


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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America and participated in a PR panel at the Sarah Lawrence College Writers Institute Conference.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Book World Needs Its Banksy Art-Shredding Moment



The world’s most famous street artist, Banksy, caused a stir when a Sotheby’s auction for one of his pieces – Girl with Balloon – fetched 1.4 million dollars and then simultaneously in spectacular fashion, destroyed the work via a shredder that was secretly built into its frame.

Great P.R. stunt.

Some believe the shredded remains could be worth a lot more than what the original work was sold for.

The book world needs some gimmicks like this.  What can the industry do to stir things up?  How about these ideas?

·         Scandal over authorship – did a best-selling book really get written by someone else?
·         Book ban -- can Amazon refuse to sell a controversial book?
·         Hoax – successful book turns out to be lies.
·         Big lawsuit – someone sues a big author for defamation or libel.
·         Publisher faux pas – some publisher does something crazy like re-write a classic or decides to keep a book on the sidelines that people clamor for.
·         A new format for the book gets invented.
·         Publishers should make the first half of a book available for free – if one likes it they will buy the rest of it.
·         An author becomes a hero – thwarts a bookstore shooting.
·         Someone buys out the remaining copies of Trump’s printed books – and burns them all.

Ok, so maybe the Banksy stunt has not been rivaled of late by the book industry, but why can’t something attention-getting happen that lights up the book world?

·         Why don’t we see a brawl in public over a book?
·         How about someone famous confesses to a crime in his or her memoir?
·         Let’s unearth the lost or secret writings of some big-name politician, celebrity, or pro-athlete.
·         It’s time to get an author rant on video that goes viral  - maybe J.K. R0wling is captured screaming crazy, racist stuff at her book editor or 50 Shades of Grey author.  E.L. James is filmed sleeping with a priest and a donkey.

What could rival the popularity of Banksy carving up his own art?  What if a famous author shows a manuscript for a book that he or she decided against publishing and torches it on FacebookLive?

How about an author, maybe a mild-mannered best-selling one, is captured on tape assaulting a journalist during an interview?

Or can we have an author put on trial for punching a politician in the face?

Folks, we need something to spotlight books.  Please do your share to commit a wild act that gets our book world more publicity and attention.

Please feel free to join me on LinkedIn --https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianfeinblum/.


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Brian Feinblum’s insightful views, provocative opinions, and interesting ideas expressed in this terrific blog are his alone and not that of his employer or anyone else. You can – and should -- follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels much more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog © 2018. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he now resides in Westchester. His writings are often featured in The Writer and IBPA’s Independent.  This was named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs and recognized by Feedspot in 2018 as one of the top book marketing blogs. Also named by WinningWriters.com as a "best resource.” He recently hosted a panel on book publicity for Book Expo America and participated in a PR panel at the Sarah Lawrence College Writers Institute Conference.